Newsclips 1986 - 1990

 

NEWS
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

519 words
26 June 1986
The Record, Northern New Jersey
All Editions.=.Bergen South. Bergen North. Bergen.; Passaic-Morris

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R. J. Reynolds, who started a tobacco empire with the marketing of Camel cigarettes in 1913, is scheduled to testify next month before a congressional subcommittee against the evils of smoking and the need for strict cautions in cigarette ads. Reynolds, 34, who has divested himself of tobacco stock, said family members disagreed with him, but "this is one of the good things in life I can do." He said he had smoked for 10 years, "and it took me five years to quit." The heir has no doubts about how grandpa would regard him. "He would be very happy with me," Reynolds said. "When he started his company, he wasn't aware that cigarette smoking causes cancer, heart disease, and lung disease."

 

 

 

Section 1

WASHINGTON TALK: 'WAKE UP AND QUIT'

39 words
17 July 1986
New York Times Abstracts
Pg. 20, Col. 1

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of founder of R J Reynolds Tobacco Co, will be star witness at Congressional hearing July 18 designed to rally support for proposal to ban cigarette advertising

 

 

 

 

House Subcommittee Told Congress Should Ban Cigarette Advertising

RICHARD CARELLI
801 words
18 July 1986
The Associated Press

(AP) _ Congress should ban all cigarette advertising to save lives and protect future generations of Americans from becoming nicotine addicts, a House subcommittee was told Friday.

Captain Kangaroo, Yul Brynner's daughter and the grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds joined the medical establishment in endorsing a bill to outlaw all promotion and advertising of tobacco products _ in newspapers and magazines, on billboards and as part of sales displays.

The bill also would ban any tobacco company from using a brand name in sponsoring public events such as sports tournaments.

The subcommittee did not hear from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, a longtime foe of cigarette smoking who supports the advertising ban.

White House Chief of Staff Donald Regan reportedly killed Koop's planned testimony, but a presidential spokesman said Friday that Koop would testify before the subcommittee Aug. 1.

""We do not have a position on any legislation calling for a ban on print advertising of cigarettes,'' White House spokesman Edward Djerejian said. ""We are in the process of studying that now.''

Representatives of the tobacco and advertising industries are scheduled to testify against the proposed ban at the Aug. 1 hearing, but Friday's hearing was dominated by supporters of the bill.

The industries argue that the advertising ban would violate free-speech rights and would have little effect on cigarette consumption. They also argue that as long as tobacco is legal, advertising it should also be legal.

At the hearing, Bob Keeshan, a former smoker and creator of the Captain Kangaroo television character, called tobacco use a threat to the well-being of the nation's youth.

""The future of America is alive today, in the minds, the healthy hearts and the healthy lungs of today's youngsters,'' Keeshan said. ""I ask you, no I implore you ... to ... take steps to assure the continued health of our young people.''

Victoria Brynner, a professional model who lives in Paris, showed the subcommitte a videotaped statement by her actor father before he died of lung cancer last year.

Now being aired, the segment features Brynner saying heavy smoking caused his fatal illness and urging others to stop smoking.

""Yul Brynner is dead. We all know why. I don't want to forget his suffering,'' Ms. Brynner said. ""I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I read newspaper articles in which representatives of the tobacco industry (say) the money spent on advertising and promotion is simply done to get present users to switch to a particular brand.''

She added: ""It is obvious that this industry must constantly try to get new smokers to replace those who have quit or who have died.''

Dr. Charles A. LeMaistre, president of the American Cancer Society, called cigarette smoking ""the single most preventable cause of death in the United States.''

""How can we ever hope to have a generation of young people who do not become nicotine addicts?'' he asked. ""Whenever they go to the ballpark, watch a tennis match, read a magazine or newspaper, or attend a rock concert they are assaulted by advertisements associating tobacco use with everything they wish for in life.''

Representatives of the American Medical Association, the American Public Health Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics also testified in support of the bill introduced last month by Rep. Mike Synar, D-Okla.

They said tobacco causes over 350,000 premature deaths each year.

Actor Patrick Reynolds, whose grandfather founded a tobacco empire in 1913, told the subcommittee: ""If the hand that once fed me is the tobacco industry, then that same hand has killed many millions of people and will continue to kill millions unless people wake up to the hazards of cigarettes.''

But Rep. Thomas J. Bliley Jr., R-Va., said the proposed elimination of the tobacco industry's $2-billion-a-year advertising expenditures will not decrease smoking.

Sen. Bill Bradley, D-N.J., and Rep. Fortney Stark, D-Calif., sponsors of a bill to strip the tobacco industry of a tax break for its advertising, testified in support of the proposed ban.

Bradley said the government should not be subsidizing attempts ""to get Americans hooked on tobacco,'' and attacked the credibility of industry claims that its ads are not aimed at attracting new smokers.

""For years, tobacco companies have been telling us that smoking doesn't cause cancer,'' he said. ""Now they're telling us that tobacco advertising doesn't cause smoking.''

Stark called those who sell and promote tobacco products ""merchants of death.''

Congress is not expected to take final action on Synar's bill this year.

Fifteen years ago, Congress banned cigarette advertising from television and radio. It prohibited the broadcast of ads for smokeless tobacco products earlier this year.

 

 

 

NEWS
Kup's Column

Kup's Column

862 words
18 July 1986
Chicago Sun-Times
FIVE STAR SPORTS FINAL
50


Let's try this one on for size. It's the lastest idea being floated in the effort to keep the White Sox in Chicago: Owners Jerry Reinsdorf and Eddie Einhorn make a case for moving out of Comiskey Park because of the high cost of maintaining the ancient structure. OK, so the city buys Comiskey Park for a nominal price and assumes the maintenance cost, thus relieving the owners of their prime problem. The city easily could defray that expense for the next two, three years while the new home for the Sox, the South Loop stadium, is under construction.

THE AMOUNT OF REVENUE generated by the White Sox for the city would help offset the cost of this proposal. And the city eventually could regain most of its expenditure by selling Comiskey Park to developers. Hence, we'd have the White Sox in a spanking new ballpark and forget Addison. . . . That's something Mayor Washington can mull over on his vacation. Incidentally, he decided not to go overseas.

YOU THINK you're suffering from our tropical heat wave? How about the poor employees in the State of Illinois Center? They're hot under the collar over the lack of air-conditioning. The 13th floor, where Gov. Thompson has his offices, was burning up at 110 degrees. And the 16th floor, where House Speaker Mike Madigan works, was a red-hot 92 degrees. You can rest assured Adlai Stevenson III will make the building a burning campaign issue.

TWO POLISH tall ships will arrive here next month to pay respects to the city with the largest Polish population outside Warsaw. One ship is the Polonia, built as a private venture in Poland by its captain, Andrew Lipinski, and his friends. The Polonia made it to New York for the Liberty Weekend, but needed a new engine to proceed. That's where Aloysius Mazewski, head of the Polish American Congress, comes in. He arranged for the PAC to buy the engine.

THE OTHER POLISH ship is the government-owned Stomil, which arrived four days late for the tall ships parade because of engine trouble. Thanks to Volvo International, the Stomil now has a new engine and is making a number of port calls en route to Chicago, final stop before sailing home. In addition to a new engine, the Stomil also took on a new boss, Barbara Demska, one of the few women ship captains.

JEROME STONE, chairman-emeritus of Stone Container and founder of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association, and Latino leader Edwin Claudio have been nominated by Mayor Washington for the Chicago Public Library Board. Their confirmation will bring the board up to its full complement of nine members. . . . Reports from Moscow indicate Ted Turner's huge losses on his Goodwill Games have placed the proposed 1990 games in Seattle in jeopardy. Lack of attendance in Moscow and pitiful TV ratings (causing rebates to advertisers) could result in a $20 million loss.

A SURPRISE witness tomorrow before a congressional hearing to support a ban on cigarette advertising will be the grandson of the founder of the R. J. Reynolds Co., a major cigarette producer. The grandson, Patrick Reynolds, told the N.Y. Times he has opposed smoking ever since his father, R. J. Reynolds Jr., died of emphysema at 54. . . . Arturo Cruz, a leader of the Nicaraguan contras, will appear on Sondra Gair's WBEZ talk show at noon today.

SIGHT SEEN: Princess Margaret, looking much prettier than in her newspaper photographs, lunching with a party of 16 at the Ciel Bleu. . . . Ivan Hill, author of Love and Ethics, holding sway at the Wrigley Building Restaurant on his pet topic, ethics in business. . . . Bears star Emery Moorehead revealing to sportscaster Chet Coppock at Billy's in Lincolnwood that he'll retire from football after one more season. . . . Tony Bennett developing his forehand with help from tennis pro Frankie Parker at McClurg Court Center.

A BENEFIT and raffle to raise funds to combat AIDS will be held Sunday afternoon at Second City. Among the stars will be Pudgy, Jimmy Damon, Richard Tutacko and the Joe Hall and Gus Giordano dancers. . . . And Pudgy will exercise her "roasting" on cast members of "Forbidden Broadway," who will attend the Wicker Room tomorrow to celebrate its 600th performance. . . . Joan McGrath, the lottery queen, and hubby Jeff adopted a son, Andrew Ryan.

A SUIT AGAINST the city will be filed today by the famous TV duo, Celozzi-Ettleson, and Elm-Brook Leasing, charging that taxes on new and used cars are discriminatory. . . . Adding a year: WFMT's Norman Pellegrini, Red Skelton, S. I. Hayakawa, Hume Cronyn, Sen. John Glenn. Tomorrow: Mary Ella Smith and Phil Cavarretta.

"KUP'S SHOW" returns to Channel 11 tomorrow at 10:30 p.m. with a special half hour on Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter. . . . Muhammad Ali will join the tribute tomorrow at the South Shore Country Club to Jesse Vaughn Sr. for his 65 years of community service. . . . And Gil Stern observes that the Soviets suddenly are interested in a nuclear test ban - "Our Statue of Liberty fireworks must have scared them."

 

 

 

D01

Off the Tobacco Road R.J. Reynolds' Grandson Patrick & His Antismoking Drive

Peter S. Canellos
Washington Post Staff Writer
760 words
18 July 1986
The Washington Post

Patrick Reynolds' favorite pose is the one that has him wearing a tight-fitting warm-up jacket and mutilating a cigarette with a come-hither look on his face.

The 35-year-old grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds and sometime Hollywood actor is in town to push for a ban on cigarette advertising before the House subcommittee on health and the environment. Reynolds has emerged this summer as one of the American Lung Association's most active antismoking crusaders, a semicelebrity whose surname adds considerable gravity and irony to his message.

The four promotional glossies he passes out as part of his antismoking campaign all show variations of the same basic scene: the trim, self-consciously boyish Reynolds staring at the camera as he destroys a smoke. The American Lung Association is so enthusiastic about the pictures that it's already planning a poster.

Reynolds describes his evolution from tobacco heir to Lung Association poster boy as one of conscience: "The hand that once fed me," he'll tell the subcommittee, "is the same hand that has killed many millions of people and will continue to kill millions unless people wake up to the hazards of cigarettes."

He will also testify that he has divested himself of all connection with R.J. Reynolds Inc., including a modest portfolio of company shares. The sale of stock did not make him a rich man, he says; most of the family fortune has been given away, and the current generation of cousins was left only enough money "to guarantee them an income."

Reynolds says his father, a chain-smoking playboy who lived high off the hog with his tobacco money, was the inspiration for his antismoking crusade.

His parents separated when he was 3, and young Patrick did not meet his dad until he was 9. His voice drops as he recalls how "at this moment of anticipation-the moment I'd longed for on so many occasions-they showed me into the room and there was an aging man with a sandbag on his chest." The sandbag was to exercise his father's chest muscles, then the treatment for emphysema. Five years later, at age 64, R.J. Reynolds Jr. died from the disease, which was probably caused by his smoking. The day after his death, his fourth wife gave birth to his only daughter.

Patrick Reynolds has been an on-again-off-again smoker, he says, as have most members of his family. He has quit and started again between seven and 10 times, but smoked his last cigarette in 1984.

His antismoking activism comes at a time when his public profile as an actor, television producer and writer is on the rise. He stars as Mandroid-half-man, half-machine-in a horror movie, "Eliminators," that was released last week for home video. He is the author of a forthcoming book on his family, which he intends to produce as a television mini-series.

Representatives of the tobacco industry suggest it is no accident that Reynolds' antismoking campaign coincides with the release of his movie. Reynolds, sensitive to the self-promotion charge, says he does not want to talk about his career, though a lengthy account of his recent activities is included in Lung Association press releases.

"I think we should take all that acting stuff out of the bio," he tells two American Lung Association officials who are with him in his hotel room. "I want to make it clear that I'm not getting anything out of this." But the officials talk him out of it. "Think of all the kids watching Eliminators' who look up to you," offers one.

Mollified, Reynolds begins to talk about his family-members of which also founded Reynolds Metals, the company that makes Reynolds Wrap-and its larger-than-life history. An uncle on his father's side was famous for his association with torch singer Libby Holman, who was accused of his murder. His cousin is Washington socialite Smith Bagley ("a terrific guy and I'm very fond of him"). His mother, Marianne O'Brien, was a 1940s starlet ("a redhead with the personality to match").

And how has this extended family, which includes one brother, four half-brothers and a half-sister, taken to his antismoking efforts?

According to Reynolds, "We've agreed to disagree."

graphics/1: Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R.J. By Joel Richardson-TWP

 

 

 

 

Leah Garchik
891 words
18 July 1986
The San Francisco Chronicle
FINAL
10

WHO SAID WHAT

"When my grandfather began making cigarets, he did not know that they cause heart disease, emphysema and cancer. Now that this has been absolutely proven, I want to help people wake up and quit. Am I biting the hand that feeds me? If the hand that once fed me is the tobacco industry, then that hand has killed 10 million people and may kill millions more."

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco company founder R. J. Reynolds, who testifies at a congressional hearing today in favor of a ban on cigaret advertising. Reynolds' father, R. J. Reynolds Jr., died of emphysema - caused by heavy smoking - at the age of 58.

.

 

 

1; Late Final Desk

Congress Urged to Prohibit All Cigarette Ads

AP
307 words
18 July 1986
Los Angeles Times
Late Final
1

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1986 All Rights Reserved)

Congress should ban all cigarette advertising to save lives and protect future generations of Americans from becoming nicotine addicts, a House subcommittee was told today.

"Captain Kangaroo," Yul Brynner's daughter and the grandson of tobacco magnate R. J. Reynolds joined the medical establishment in endorsing a bill to outlaw all promotion and advertising of tobacco products and to ban any tobacco company from using a brand name in sponsoring public events such as sports tournaments.

Patrick Reynolds, whose grandfather founded a tobacco empire in 1913, said his father, Richard J. Reynolds, "died from emphysema after years of heavy smoking."

Reynolds, who said he sold his tobacco company stock years ago and claimed he is not estranged from his family over his militant anti-smoking stance, called cigarette advertising "the single biggest lie perpetrated on the American people."

`Proven Killers'

"To allow continued advertising of cigarettes when they are proven killers is plainly immoral," Reynolds said.

Bob Keeshan, a former smoker and creator of the Captain Kangaroo television character, called tobacco use a threat to the well-being of the nation's youth.

"The future of America is alive today, in the minds, the healthy hearts and the healthy lungs of today's youngsters," Keeshan said. "I implore you . . . to . . . take steps to assure the continued health of our young people."

Victoria Brynner, a professional model who lives in Paris, showed the subcommittee a videotaped statement by her actor-father before he died of lung cancer last year.

Now being aired, the segment features Brynner saying heavy smoking caused his fatal illness and urging others to stop smoking.

The subcommittee did not hear today from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, who supports the advertising ban, but a presidential spokesman said Koop will testify Aug. 1.

 

 

 

NEWS

Smoking Ad Ban Vital, Panel Told

AP
388 words
19 July 1986
The Saturday Oklahoman


(AP) _ Congress should ban all cigarette advertising to save lives and protect future generations of Americans from becoming nicotine addicts, a House subcommittee was told Friday.

Captain Kangaroo, Yul Brynner's daughter and the grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds joined the medical establishment in endorsing a bill to outlaw all promotion and advertising of tobacco products _ in newspapers and magazines, on billboards and as part of sales displays.

The bill, introduced last month by Rep. Mike Synar, D-Muskogee, also would ban any tobacco company from using a brand name in sponsoring public events such as sports tournaments.

The subcommittee did not hear from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, a longtime foe of cigarette smoking who supports the ad ban.

White House Chief of Staff Donald Regan reportedly killed Koop's planned testimony, but a presidential spokesman said Friday that Koop would testify before the subcommittee Aug. 1.

Representatives of the tobacco and advertising industries are scheduled to testify against the ban at the Aug. 1 hearing.

Bob Keeshan, a former smoker and creator of the Captain Kangaroo television character, called tobacco use a threat to the well-being of the nation's youth.

""The future of America is alive today, in the minds, the healthy hearts and the healthy lungs of today's youngsters,'' Keeshan said. ""I ask you, no I implore you ... to ... take steps to assure the continued health of our young people.''

Victoria Brynner showed the subcommittee a videotaped statement by her actor father before he died of lung cancer last year.

""Yul Brynner is dead. We all know why,'' Brynner said. ""I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I read newspaper articles in which representatives of the tobacco industry (say) the money spent on advertising and promotion is simply done to get present users to switch to a particular brand.''

She added: ""It is obvious that this industry must constantly try to get new smokers to replace those who have quit or who have died.''

Actor Patrick Reynolds, whose grandfather founded a tobacco empire in 1913, told the subcommittee: ""If the hand that once fed me is the tobacco industry, then that same hand has killed many millions of people and will continue to kill millions unless people wake up.''

 

 

 

Popular Employer: Despite Its Critics, Tobacco Industry Isn't Short of Top Talent --- Many Workers Say Cigarettes Aren't a Proven Hazard; The Toll of Rationalizing --- Hard Questions From Friends

By Trish Hall
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal
1,670 words
The Wall Street Journal
25 July 1986

When Renee Simons graduated from college in 1967, she went to work as a reading specialist in New York City. "I wanted to make the world better," she recalls.

However, soon frustrated by the public schools, she enrolled in Columbia University's business school. Today, at the age of 37, Ms. Simons is the brand manager for Benson & Hedges, the second-largest cigarette brand at Philip Morris Cos.

Although Ms. Simons describes herself as a "'60s person" who, as a black, developed a strong race consciousness in that era, she finds nothing anomalous about selling cigarettes.

"I don't see any ethical dilemma," she says. "I see it as a product that consumers desire." Ms. Simons, a nonsmoker, says she would never sell anything illegal. Short of that, she believes, she could probably market anything.

Ms. Simons, like thousands of others throughout the U.S., works in an industry that, despite its economic health, is arguably the country's most beleaguered and most often criticized. Hardly a day passes without a suggestion that tobacco products be restricted in some way.

In just the last few months, the Army has curbed smoking, the American Medical Association has campaigned to ban tobacco advertising, New York's mayor has proposed a tough anti-smoking law and the Federal Trade Commission has accused RJR Nabisco Inc. of misrepresenting the hazards of smoking in its advertisements.

Says Adele Abrams Bunoski, who until recently worked for the Tobacco Institute, the industry trade group: "I think there is an erroneous perception that people who work for the industry have horns and are probably lurking around playgrounds trying to give children samples." The industry, she says, adheres to a self-adopted code governing advertising and sampling.

Industry polls show that only 37% of the country has a favorable impression of the tobacco industry; the rest disapprove. Nonetheless, the top companies still manage to attract and retain high-quality executives. While the public may believe that these executives knowingly sell a dangerous product, many of the employees seem genuinely to believe that the evidence on smoking's health hazards isn't conclusive. They view smoking as a matter of choice, and they often express frustration with critics they consider ill-informed and extremist, particularly the surgeon general, who argues that smoking kills 350,000 people a year.

Organizational experts say these attitudes are typical of workers in industries with public-image problems. "The human organism is just wonderful at making do," says Richard Hackman, professor of organizational behavior and psychology at Yale University. "I would be very surprised if you found tobacco workers who were chronically distressed. They probably came to terms with it four months after they started the job."

Collins Kilburn, executive director of the North Carolina Council of Churches, says: "Many people in North Carolina know in the bottom of their souls that there is something wrong with making a living off of something harmful." But he says only a few have ever told him they wish they could find other work. He explains: "Mainly, people rationalize. They say, if we don't grow it and sell it, someone else will. Or they say, life is full of risks anyway."

Some tobacco workers, however, find the rationalizing takes a toll, and they are relieved when they leave the business. Ray Lane, who edited the Tobacco Institute's magazine for 18 months, says people coped with their discomfort by making fun of the business. The top brass were called the puff barons, he says, and the office, enveloped in smoke, was nicknamed the cancer ward.

Mr. Lane, who says his wife was always distressed by the idea of his working for the institute, also found friends and acquaintances would question his job choice so that generally, except when in the Southern tobacco regions, "I kept a low profile."

Why, then, did he and those who felt similarly work there? "The attractions were dollars," he says. But finally that didn't suffice: "Whatever your rationalization, the bottom line is we're talking caskets."

Recruiters say some executives refuse to work for tobacco companies, and some consultants won't take on tobacco-related jobs. Market researcher Judith Langer refuses tobacco assignments but is uncomfortable making the refusals. "It's a tense moment," she says. "I suspect there is a sense of implied criticism."

In a rare defection, the grandson of tobacco-company founder R.J. Reynolds, is making an anti-tobacco advertisement for the American Lung Association. "When my grandfather began manufacturing cigarettes, we didn't know they were dangerous," says Patrick Reynolds, a 32-year-old actor. "Now that we do, I want to do something about it." Mr. Reynolds, who sold his stock in RJR seven years ago, says his father, who smoked heavily for years, suffered from emphysema and died "a terrible death" at the age of 58.

As the industry diversifies, more and more people work for companies that sell cigarettes. In just the last year, the 55,000 employees of General Foods Corp. and the 68,000 employees of Nabisco Brands Inc. have, in effect, become tobacco workers. At General Foods, posters promoting a quit-smoking clinic have been removed.

Typically, tobacco employees say they don't often have to confront negative attitudes toward their industry. When she meets people at parties, for instance, Ms. Simons says strangers may ask how the company's acquisition of General Foods Corp. is proceeding, but they don't bring up health issues. "They certainly do not question my ethical judgment," she says.

And within the tobacco companies is a supportive environment and, frequently, lifelong employment. For example, Philip Morris, the largest cigarette maker, promotes from within and recruits very little at the top business schools. The New York-based company is one of the employers cited in the book, "The 100 Best Companies to Work for in America."

Ms. Simons decided to work for Philip Morris when she took a job with Seven-Up in St. Louis, partly because her husband had taken a job in that city. She welcomed an offer to move to the tobacco business in New York last year, again in part because her husband, a vice president with CBS, had moved there. She found the job attractive for numerous reasons: "The products are very sizable {in terms of sales}, and I saw that as a challenge," she says. She also considers cigarettes a creative test because they can't be advertised on television.

Michael Bishop had been a journalism professor at the University of North Carolina and had worked in public relations when he went to work for R.J. Reynolds in 1978. "Sure people questioned me. I was criticized by friends," he says, although usually he heard the comments secondhand.

His decision to work at Reynolds stemmed from his feeling about the South. "I don't use tobacco. I don't want my children to use tobacco, and I'm just as happy not selling tobacco," says Mr. Bishop, a native of Arkansas who remained at Reynolds until 1980. "But I'm a Southerner. I was working for a Southern industry that shows one of the greatest potentials for helping this region and the way of life."

Current and even former employees tend to hew to the industry position that there isn't clinical, cause-and-effect proof showing that cigarettes cause lung cancer and heart disease.

George Weissman, the former Philip Morris chairman who remains a director, says he doesn't believe most of the allegations against tobacco. "All they have ever had are statistics which are very much open to question. A lot more research is needed," he says.

As for the ethics, Mr. Weissman maintains that any industry presents problems. "Is there any business that's so absolutely pure that you don't have an ethical or moral dilemma?" he asks. "There is no escaping them. This is the tension that makes life worth living."

David Narr, who worked in public affairs at Reynolds for almost three years before leaving in 1981, says most employees seemed to agree with management's position on smoking and health. About six years ago, he says, Reynolds hired an outside firm to survey employees and found that their opinions generally matched those of the company and were quite at odds with those held by the general public.

In a recent interview with Insight magazine, Reynolds Tobacco president Gerald Long stated he would get out of the business if he knew for sure that tobacco was killing people. Tony Schwartz, a New York advertising and media expert whose best friend is dying of lung cancer, is using that comment in an anti-tobacco radio commercial. In the commercial, Mr. Schwartz's friend, Ken McFeeley, addresses Mr. Long, saying, "You know tobacco is harmful to health" and challenges the executive to take a lie-detector test at Mr. McFeeley's expense. Mr. Long declined to be interviewed for this story.

Are there some people in the companies who think smoking is dangerous and nevertheless continue to promote cigarettes? Robert Tracey, who worked at Philip Morris for 13 years before leaving to start his own company, says that among 59,000 employees, there must be some who don't believe the company's stance. But if someone is making $90,000 a year and gets stock options, Mr. Tracey says, "What's he going to do?"

Although Mr. Tracey doesn't smoke himself and says he wouldn't encourage his daughter to smoke -- "in fact, I would discourage her" -- he argues that there isn't adequate proof that smoking causes disease.

Pressed to explain the apparent contradiction, Mr. Tracey says: "It's hard to criticize the product when I love that company so much."

 

 

 

LIFE

Lung association anti-smoking crusader grandson of tobacco baron R.J. Reynolds

THE WASHINGTON POST
627 words
25 July 1986
The Toronto Star
SATURDAY 1
L11

Patrick Reynolds' favorite pose is the one that has him wearing a tight-fitting warm-up jacket and mutilating a cigarette with a come-hither look on his face.

The 35-year-old grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds and sometime Hollywood actor was in Washington recently to push for a ban on cigarette advertising before the House subcommittee on health and the environment.

Reynolds has emerged this summer as one of the American Lung Association's most active anti-smoking crusaders, a semi-celebrity whose surname adds considerable gravity and irony to his message.

The four promotional glossies he passes out as part of his anti-smoking campaign all show variations of the same basic scene: the trim, self-consciously boyish Reynolds staring at the camera as he destroys a smoke. The American Lung Association is so enthusiastic about the pictures that it's already planning a poster.

Reynolds describes his evolution from tobacco heir to Lung Association poster boy as one of conscience: "The hand that once fed me is the same hand that has killed many millions of people and will continue to kill millions unless people wake up to the hazards of cigarettes."

He can also testify that he has divested himself of all connection with R.J. Reynolds Inc., including a modest portfolio of company shares. The sale of stock did not make him a rich man, he says; most of the family fortune has been given away, and the current generation of cousins was left only enough money "to guarantee them an income."

Reynolds says his father, a chain-smoking playboy who lived high off the hog with his tobacco money, was the inspiration for his anti-smoking crusade.

His parents separated when he was 3, and young Patrick did not meet his dad until he was 9. His voice drops as he recalls how "at this moment of anticipation - the moment I'd longed for on so many occasions - they showed me into the room and there was an aging man with a sandbag on his chest." The sandbag was to exercise his father's chest muscles, then the treatment for emphysema. Five years later, at age 64, R.J. Reynolds Jr. died from the disease, which was probably caused by his smoking. The day after his death, his fourth wife gave birth to his only daughter.

Patrick Reynolds has been an on-again-off-again smoker, he says, as have most members of his family. He has quit and started again between seven and 10 times, but smoked his last cigarette in 1984.

His anti-smoking activism comes at a time when his public profile as an actor, television producer and writer is on the rise. He stars as Mandroid - half-man, half-machine - in a horror movie, Eliminators, that was released recently for home video. He is the author of a forthcoming book on his family, which he intends to produce as a television mini-series.

Representatives of the tobacco industry suggest it is no accident Reynolds' anti-smoking campaign coincides with the release of his movie. Reynolds, sensitive to the self-promotion charge, says he does not want to talk about his career, though a lengthy account of his recent activities is included in Lung Association press releases.

"I think we should take all that acting stuff out of the bio," he tells two American Lung Association officials who are with him in his hotel room. "I want to make it clear I'm not getting anything out of this." But the officials talk him out of it. "Think of all the kids watching Eliminators who look up to you."

 

 

 

EDITORIAL
LETTERS

Hey, smokers! Why should we accept your filthy habit?

1,110 words
11 August 1986
Chicago Sun-Times
FIVE STAR SPORTS FINAL
24


A recent Personal View (Aug. 5) by a lady from Indiana suggested "Smokers should buy shoes if they want to enjoy a cigarette in peace." Her point was that shoe stores are the one place that still make smokers feel welcome.

The idea is financially appealing to me. As more smokers heed the advice, maybe now, as my wife approaches the shoe stores, she will see the cloud of poisonous gases and reassess whether the health risk is worth the effort!

My experience with smokers is that they feel everyone must accept their personal, anti-health habit. They think God has chosen them to spread the toxic pollutants everywhere they go.

As Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R. J. Reynolds, who founded the huge tobacco company, testified in Washington last month, "Cigarette advertising is the single biggest lie perpetrated on the American people. To allow continued advertising of cigarettes when they are proven killers is plainly immoral."

Years ago, I attended a Chicago Cubs baseball game. You know - sunshine, a hot dog and soda pop, great seats, except . . .after the first inning, the excitement and fun ceased for all of us in that section. Why? Three middle-aged men lit up the biggest, ugliest, most putrid-smelling cigars I have ever seen! Their second-hand smoke caused one kid to become ill, and after the third inning, most fans switched to another section. So much for "fresh" air at the old ballpark!

But the emission of these toxic wastes also happens at work, in public buildings and in restaurants, even though 70 percent of the population does not smoke.

So, smokers, go buy some shoes and save lives by confining your personal habit to shoe stores! Kenneth D. Dubinski, Elk Grove Village

Flakes, are we?

 

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

Who Is The Man Who Defies Smoking?

TOM MINEHART
1,365 words
17 August 1986
The Associated Press

(Copyright 1986. The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

(AP) _ He hands out pictures of himself crushing packs of Camels, blaming smoking for the death of his father and millions of other people. He appears on television talk shows, writes the president, and testifies before a congressional committee, condemning cigarette advertising as immoral.

This tobacco town has seen it all before, except for one thing: This crusader is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds, the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. of Winston-Salem.

""Some people say I'm biting the hand that feeds me,'' says Patrick Reynolds, a 37-year-old actor who recently came home to Winston-Salem to explain his position to outraged family members. ""I say the hand that fed me _ the tobacco industry _ has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more unless smokers wake up.''

A reformed smoker himself, Reynold's message is the same wherever he can find an audience: Cigarettes have killed 10 million Americans since 1950 and smoking is costing the U.S. economy $65 million a year in medical care and lost productivity. He urges higher taxes on cigarettes and a ban on cigarette advertising, a $2.3 billion-a-year industry.

The tobacco industry claims no link between smoking and disease has ever been proven.

Some of his four brothers say Reynolds' campaign is a publicity stunt for a book he is writing and a television miniseries they fear will make the Reynolds family look like characters from ""Dallas.''

""Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves,'' says John D. Reynolds, a 50-year-old Winston-Salem aquaculturalist and Patrick's half-brother. ""He's creating an unnecessary stir for his own sake.''

But Reynolds says the book and TV plans spring from a need to understand himself and the father he never knew _ a father whose death seeded his anti-smoking zeal.

Patrick Reynolds was 9 years old the first time he remembers meeting his father, Richard Reynolds Jr., the son of patriarch R.J. Reynolds. He had sent a letter asking to meet his father, who divorced Patrick's mother when the boy was 3.

""I was starved for love and affection and thrilled that I was finally going to get to meet this demigod my mother brought me up to believe he was,'' says Reynolds. ""The moment of meeting him was a wonderful thing, except for one thing _ he had sandbags on his chest to exercise his lungs. They thought he had been taken by asthma, but it turned out to be emphysema _ the result of heavy smoking.'' His father died at age 58 in 1964, when Patrick was 15.

Ten years later, Patrick himself was smoking _ an addiction that lasted another 10 years.

""I'm human,'' he says. ""I fought it. It was a battle to get off cigarettes. I struggled for five years and quit in 1984.''

Reynolds inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 in 1969. After studying business and film production in college, he had movie roles in ""Nashville'' and ""Airplane,'' and he stars as a half-robot ""Mandroid'' in the new video production ""Eliminators.'' He is also involved in producing, publishing and real estate.

Reynolds says he tried from 1983 to 1985 to get a job with RJR Nabisco Inc. of Winston-Salem, the conglomerate that owns R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. He says company officials at one point mentioned the possibility of his joining the board of directors _ where no Reynolds has served since the 1930s.

It was his secret intention, Reynolds says, to work from within the company to get it to divest its tobacco holdings. In any case, the company declined to hire him, and Reynolds began his anti-smoking campaign soon afterwards.

Reynolds has sold his stock in the company, but he has no plans to give back the $2.5 million inheritance.

In May, Reynolds met in Washington with Sen. Robert Packwood, R-Ore., chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

""I suggested it was shocking that a special interest like cigarettes could get enough support in Congress to keep taxes among the lowest in the world, and that this must arouse the cynicism of the U.S. public in the way this nation is governed,'' Reynolds says.

In July, Reynolds testfied before a House committee investigating cigarette advertising aimed at women and young people.

A Republican and an admirer of President Reagan's, he recently wrote the president urging his support of a ban on cigarette ads, saying ""advertising of these proven killers in plainly immoral.''

John D. Reynolds, and another half-brother, 46-year-old William N. Reynolds of Winston-Salem, say Patrick is seeking publicity for his acting career, his book and his TV production.

A third half-brother, 52-year-old Richard ""Josh'' Reynolds III of Southern Pines, says he's disturbed Patrick is pushing for higher cigarette taxes because, ""I don't support higher taxes for anything.''

Michael Reynolds, 39, of Winston-Salem, Patrick's only full brother, said RJR Nabisco stock has actually risen since Patrick spoke out.

Another half-brother, Zachary, died at 41 in a 1979 plane crash. A half-sister, Irene, was born shortly after their father died and lives in Switzerland.

"I don't like the idea he's going to try to do a "Dallas'-type program of very wealthy Reynoldses walking around in a made-for-TV movie, surrounded by beautiful women,'' John Reynolds says. ""Most Reynoldses don't have much money relative to what people think.''

He disputed Patrick's contention that their father died from cigarettes, saying he actually died from pneumonia he caught while racing yachts.

Later, John said, ""We're all friendly to Patrick. We have no animosity toward him. I just wish the kid would straighten up and not take this stand himself. Let him pay someone else to do it.''

Although RJR Nabisco is the largest employer in Winston-Salem, with 14,000 workers, residents seem to be largely ignoring Patrick's crusade. Suzanne Brownlow, letters editor of the Winston-Salem Journal, says only one or two people have written the paper so far.

""Regardless of his name, he is a private citizen,'' she said. ""Our readers are too busy worrying about the topless bar they're building downtown.''

Reynolds has a contract with publisher Little, Brown and Co. of Boston to write a book, whose title he declined to reveal, with Tom Shachtman, author of ""Edith and Woodrow,'' ""The Phony War'' and ""The FBI-KGB War.''

Quoting from the introduction, Patrick says the book ""chronicles the creation and dissolution of a great American family'' with ""episodes of heroism, romance, entrepreneurial genius, business rivalries that shook the nation, political intrigue, multiple and difficult marriages, divorce settlements in the millions, international playboys and gold diggers, blood feuds, suicide-murder, alcoholism and a surfeit of human excess.''

The Reynolds brothers' uncle, Z. Smith Reynolds, died of a gunshot wound in 1932 at the age of 20. His wife, Broadway star Libby Holman, was charged with murder, but the charges were dropped at the request of the family.

The book also says Richard Reynolds Jr., who married four times, made loans that helped Franklin D. Roosevelt win the election of 1940.

Rich Jachetti, a New York public relations consultant for the American Lung Association, last year invited Reynolds to become the first member of the association's ""Celebrity Advisory Board.''

""We'll be doing public service announcements with Patrick _ probably TV, definitely radio,'' Jachetti says. ""We may also do a poster campaign with him. We're also talking about having Patrick function as a spokesman for the association in schools around the country and on media programs.''

Reynolds says he has a great idea for a public service spot: ""I'd be looking in the camera, and rather than saying who I am, there'd be a byline saying "Patrick Reynolds: member of the R.J. Reynolds family.' I'd say: "When we began manufacturing cigarettes, we didn't realize they could cause heart disease, emphysema and lung cancer. Stop smoking now.' It'd be very brief.''

Document asp0000020011119di8h00opj

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

SUNDAY NEWS

Tobacco heir fights `killer' cigarettes

Tom Minehart
1,016 words
17 August 1986
Chicago Sun-Times
SUNDAY THREE STAR
12


WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. He hands out pictures of himself crushing packs of Camels, blaming smoking for the death of his father and millions of other people.

He appears on television talk shows, writes the president, and testifies before a congressional committee, condemning cigarette advertising as immoral.

This tobacco town has seen it all before, except for one thing: This crusader is the grandson of R. J. Reynolds, founder of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. of Winston-Salem.

"Some people say I'm biting the hand that feeds me," says Patrick Reynolds, a 37-year-old actor who recently came home to Winston-Salem to explain his position to outraged family members. "I say the hand that fed me - the tobacco industry - has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more unless smokers wake up."

A reformed smoker himself, Reynolds has the same message wherever he can find an audience: Cigarettes have killed 10 million Americans since 1950 and smoking is costing the U.S. economy $65 billion a year in medical care and lost productivity. He urges higher taxes on cigarettes and a ban on cigarette advertising, a $2.3 billion-a-year industry.

Some of his four brothers say Reynolds' campaign is a publicity stunt for a book he is writing and a television mini-series they fear will make the Reynolds family look like characters from "Dallas."

But Reynolds says the book and TV plans spring from a need to understand himself and the father he never knew - a father whose death seeded his anti-smoking zeal.

Patrick Reynolds was 9 years old the first time he remembers meeting his father, Richard Reynolds Jr., son of patriarch R. J. Reynolds. He had sent a letter asking to meet his father, who divorced Patrick's mother when the boy was 3.

"I was starved for love and affection and thrilled that I was finally going to get to meet this demigod my mother brought me up to believe he was," says Reynolds. "The moment of meeting him was a wonderful thing, except for one thing - he had sandbags on his chest to exercise his lungs. They thought he had been taken by asthma, but it turned out to be emphysema - the result of heavy smoking."

His father died at age 58 in 1964, when Patrick was 15.

Ten years later, Patrick himself was smoking - an addiction that lasted another 10 years.

"I'm human," he says. "I fought it. It was a battle to get off cigarettes. I struggled for five years and quit in 1984."

Reynolds inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 in 1969. After studying business and film production in college, he had movie roles in "Nashville" and "Airplane," and he stars as a half-robot "Mandroid" in the new video production "Eliminators."

He also is involved in producing, publishing and real estate.

Reynolds says he tried from 1983 to 1985 to get a job with RJR Nabisco Inc. of Winston-Salem, the conglomerate that owns R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. He says company officials at one point mentioned the possibility of his joining the board of directors - where no Reynolds has served since the 1930s.

It was his secret intention, Reynolds says, to work from within the company to get it to divest its tobacco holdings.

In any case, the company declined to hire him, and Reynolds began his anti-smoking campaign soon afterward.

Reynolds has sold his stock in the company, but he has no plans to give back the $2.5 million inheritance.

In May, Reynolds met in Washington with Sen. Bob Packwood (R-Ore.), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

"I suggested it was shocking that a special interest like cigarettes could get enough support in Congress to keep taxes among the lowest in the world, and that this must arouse the cynicism of the U.S. public in the way this nation is governed," Reynolds says.

In July, Reynolds testified before a House committee investigating cigarette advertising aimed at women and young people.

A Republican and an admirer of President Reagan, he recently wrote the president urging his support of a ban on cigarette ads, saying "advertising of these proven killers in plainly immoral."

John D. Reynolds, a 50-year-old Winston-Salem aquiculturist and Patrick's half brother, disputed Patrick's contention that their father died from cigarettes, saying he actually died from pneumonia he caught while racing yachts.

Later, John said, "We're all friendly to Patrick. We have no animosity toward him. I just wish the kid would straighten up and not take this stand himself. Let him pay someone else to do it."

Quoting from its introduction, Patrick says the book he is writing "chronicles the creation and dissolution of a great American family" with "episodes of heroism, romance, entrepreneurial genius, business rivalries that shook the nation, political intrigue, multiple and difficult marriages, divorce settlements in the millions, international playboys and gold diggers, blood feuds, suicide-murder, alcoholism and a surfeit of human excess."

Rich Jachetti, a New York public relations consultant for the American Lung Association, last year invited Reynolds to become the first member of the association's "Celebrity Advisory Board."

"We'll be doing public service announcements with Patrick - probably TV, definitely radio," Jachetti says.

"We may also do a poster campaign with him. We're also talking about having Patrick function as a spokesman for the association in schools around the country and on media programs."

Reynolds says he has a great idea for a public service spot: "I'd be looking in the camera, and rather than saying who I am, there'd be a byline saying `Patrick Reynolds: member of the R. J. Reynolds family.' I'd say: `When we began manufacturing cigarettes, we didn't realize they could cause heart disease, emphysema and lung cancer. Stop smoking now.' It'd be very brief."

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco mogul R. J. Reynolds, dumps packs of cigarettes.; Credit: Associated Press

Document chi0000020011119di8h00u3w

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

1

Tobacco heir defies family, stages anti-smoking campaign

TOM MINEHART
Associated Press
1,167 words
17 August 1986
Houston Chronicle
2 STAR
12


WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - He hands out pictures of himself crushing packs of Camels, blaming smoking for the death of his father and millions of other people. He appears on television talk shows, writes the president, and testifies before a congressional committee, condemning cigarette advertising as immoral.

This tobacco town has seen it all before, except for one thing: This crusader is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds, the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. of Winston-Salem.

``Some people say I'm biting the hand that feeds me,'' says Patrick Reynolds, a 37-year-old actor who recently came home to Winston-Salem to explain his position to outraged family members. ``I say the hand that fed me - the tobacco industry - has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more unless smokers wake up.''

A reformed smoker himself, Reynold's message is the same wherever he can find an audience: Cigarettes have killed 10 million Americans since 1950 and smoking is costing the U.S. economy $65 million a year in medical care and lost productivity. He urges higher taxes on cigarettes and a ban on cigarette advertising, a $2.3 billion-a-year industry.

The tobacco industry claims no link between smoking and disease has ever been proven.

Some of his four brothers say Reynolds' campaign is a publicity stunt for a book he is writing and a television miniseries they fear will make the Reynolds family look like characters from ``Dallas.''

``Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves,'' says John D. Reynolds, a 50-year-old Winston-Salem aquaculturalist and Patrick's half-brother. ``He's creating an unnecessary stir for his own sake.''

But Reynolds says the book and TV plans spring from a need to understand himself and the father he never knew - a father whose death seeded his anti-smoking zeal.

Patrick Reynolds was 9 years old the first time he remembers meeting his father, Richard Reynolds Jr., the son of patriarch R.J. Reynolds. He had sent a letter asking to meet his father, who divorced Patrick's mother when the boy was 3.

``I was starved for love and affection and thrilled that I was finally going to get to meet this demigod my mother brought me up to believe he was,'' says Reynolds. ``The moment of meeting him was a wonderful thing, except for one thing - he had sandbags on his chest to exercise his lungs. They thought he had been taken by asthma, but it turned out to be emphysema - the result of heavy smoking.'' His father died at age 58 in 1964, when Patrick was 15.

Ten years later, Patrick himself was smoking - an addiction that lasted another 10 years.

``I'm human,'' he says. ``I fought it. It was a battle to get off cigarettes. I struggled for five years and quit in 1984.''

Reynolds inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 in 1969. After studying business and film production in college, he had movie roles in ``Nashville'' and ``Airplane,'' and he stars as a half-robot Mandroid in the new video production ``Eliminators.'' He is also involved in producing, publishing and real estate.

Reynolds says he tried from 1983 to 1985 to get a job with RJR Nabisco Inc. of Winston-Salem, the conglomerate that owns R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. He says company officials at one point mentioned the possibility of his joining the board of directors - where no Reynolds has served since the 1930s.

It was his secret intention, Reynolds says, to work from within the company to get it to divest its tobacco holdings. In any case, the company declined to hire him, and Reynolds began his anti-smoking campaign soon afterwards.

Reynolds has sold his stock in the company, but he has no plans to give back the $2.5 million inheritance.

In May, Reynolds met in Washington with Sen. Robert Packwood, R-Ore., chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

``I suggested it was shocking that a special interest like cigarettes could get enough support in Congress to keep taxes among the lowest in the world, and that this must arouse the cynicism of the U.S. public in the way this nation is governed,'' Reynolds says.

In July, Reynolds testified before a House committee investigating cigarette advertising aimed at women and young people.

A Republican and an admirer of President Reagan's, he recently wrote the president urging his support of a ban on cigarette ads, saying ``advertising of these proven killers is plainly immoral.''

John D. Reynolds and another half-brother, 46-year-old William N. Reynolds of Winston-Salem, say Patrick is seeking publicity for his acting career, his book and his TV production.

A third half-brother, 52-year-old Richard ``Josh'' Reynolds III of Southern Pines, says he's disturbed that Patrick is pushing for higher cigarette taxes because, ``I don't support higher taxes for anything.''

Michael Reynolds, 39, of Winston-Salem, Patrick's only full brother, said RJR Nabisco stock has actually risen since Patrick spoke out.

Another half-brother, Zachary, died at 41 in a 1979 plane crash. A half-sister, Irene, was born shortly after their father died and lives in Switzerland.

`I don't like the idea he's going to try to do a ``Dallas-''type program of very wealthy Reynoldses walking around in a made-for-TV movie, surrounded by beautiful women,'' John Reynolds says. ``Most Reynoldses don't have much money relative to what people think.''

He disputed Patrick's contention that their father died from cigarettes, saying he actually died from pneumonia he caught while racing yachts.

Later, John said, ``We're all friendly to Patrick. We have no animosity toward him. I just wish the kid would straighten up and not take this stand himself. Let him pay someone else to do it.''

Although RJR Nabisco is the largest employer in Winston-Salem, with 14,000 workers, residents seem to be largely ignoring Patrick's crusade. Suzanne Brownlow, letters editor of the Winston-Salem Journal, says only one or two people have written the paper so far.

``Regardless of his name, he is a private citizen,'' she said. ``Our readers are too busy worrying about the topless bar they're building downtown.''

Reynolds has a contract with publisher Little, Brown and Co. of Boston to write a book, whose title he declined to reveal, with Tom Shachtman, author of ``Edith and Woodrow, The Phony War'' and ``The FBI-KGB War.''

Quoting from the introduction, Patrick says the book ``chronicles the creation and dissolution of a great American family'' with ``episodes of heroism, romance, entrepreneurial genius, business rivalries that shook the nation, political intrigue, multiple and difficult marriages, divorce settlements in the millions, international playboys and gold diggers, blood feuds, suicide-murder, alcoholism and a surfeit of human excess.''

Mug: Patrick Reynolds

Document hou0000020011119di8h00yjh

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

1; Advance Desk

No Ifs or Butts Tobacco Heir Hopes to Snuff Out Smoking Habit as Family Fumes

TOM MINEHART
Associated Press
1,423 words
17 August 1986
Los Angeles Times
Bulldog
2

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1986 All Rights Reserved)

He hands out pictures of himself crushing packs of Camels, blaming smoking for the death of his father and millions of other people. He appears on television talk shows, writes the President, and testifies before a congressional committee, condemning cigarette advertising as immoral.

This tobacco town has seen it all before, except for one thing: This crusader is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds, the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. of Winston-Salem.

"Some people say I'm biting the hand that feeds me," said Patrick Reynolds, a 37-year-old actor who recently came home to Winston-Salem to explain his position to outraged family members. "I say the hand that fed me-the tobacco industry-has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more unless smokers wake up."

A reformed smoker himself, Reynold's message is the same wherever he can find an audience: Cigarettes have killed 10 million Americans since 1950 and smoking is costing the U.S. economy $65 billion a year in medical care and lost productivity. He urges higher taxes on cigarettes and a ban on cigarette advertising, a $2.3-billion-a-year industry.

Writing a Book

The tobacco industry claims that no link between smoking and disease has ever been proved.

Some of his four brothers say Reynolds' campaign is a publicity stunt for a book he is writing and a television miniseries they fear will make the Reynolds family look like characters from "Dallas."

"Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves," said John D. Reynolds, a 50-year-old Winston-Salem aquaculturalist and Patrick's half-brother. "He's creating an unnecessary stir for his own sake."

But Reynolds said the book and TV plans spring from a need to understand himself and the father he never knew-a father whose death seeded his anti-smoking zeal.

Patrick Reynolds was 9 years old the first time he remembers meeting his father, Richard Reynolds Jr., the son of patriarch R.J. Reynolds. He had sent a letter asking to meet his father, who divorced Patrick's mother when the boy was 3.

"I was starved for love and affection and thrilled that I was finally going to get to meet this demigod my mother brought me up to believe he was," Reynolds said. "The moment of meeting him was a wonderful thing, except for one thing-he had sandbags on his chest to exercise his lungs. They thought he had been taken by asthma, but it turned out to be emphysema-the result of heavy smoking." His father died at age 58 in 1964, when Patrick was 15.

Ten years later, Patrick himself was smoking-an addiction that lasted another 10 years.

"I'm human," he said. "I fought it. It was a battle to get off cigarettes. I struggled for five years and quit in 1984."

Reynolds inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 in 1969. After studying business and film production in college, he had movie roles in "Nashville" and "Airplane," and he stars as a half-robot "Mandroid" in the new video production "Eliminators." He is also involved in producing, publishing and real estate.

Reynolds said he tried from 1983 to 1985 to get a job with RJR Nabisco Inc. of Winston-Salem, the conglomerate that owns R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. He said company officials at one point mentioned the possibility of his joining the board of directors-where no Reynolds has served since the 1930s.

It was his secret intention, Reynolds said, to work from within the company to get it to divest its tobacco holdings. In any case, the company declined to hire him, and Reynolds began his anti-smoking campaign soon afterward.

Reynolds has sold his stock in the company, but he has no plans to give back the $2.5-million inheritance.

In May, Reynolds met in Washington with Sen. Robert Packwood (R-Ore.), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

Support for Special Interests

"I suggested it was shocking that a special interest like cigarettes could get enough support in Congress to keep taxes among the lowest in the world, and that this must arouse the cynicism of the U.S. public in the way this nation is governed," Reynolds said.

In July, Reynolds testified before a House committee investigating cigarette advertising aimed at women and young people.

A Republican and an admirer of President Reagan, he recently wrote the President urging his support of a ban on cigarette ads, saying "advertising of these proven killers is plainly immoral."

John D. Reynolds, and another half-brother, 46-year-old William N. Reynolds of Winston-Salem, say Patrick is seeking publicity for his acting career, his book and his TV production.

A third half-brother, 52-year-old Richard (Josh) Reynolds III of Southern Pines, said he is disturbed that Patrick is pushing for higher cigarette taxes because, "I don't support higher taxes for anything."

Michael Reynolds, 39, of Winston-Salem, Patrick's only full brother, said RJR Nabisco stock has actually risen since Patrick spoke out. Another half-brother, Zachary, died at 41 in a 1979 plane crash. A half-sister, Irene, was born shortly after their father died and lives in Switzerland.

"I don't like the idea he's going to try to do a `Dallas'-type program of very wealthy Reynoldses walking around in a made-for-TV movie, surrounded by beautiful women," John Reynolds said. "Most Reynoldses don't have much money relative to what people think."

He disputed Patrick's contention that their father died from cigarettes, saying he actually died from pneumonia he caught while racing yachts.

`We Have No Animosity

Later, John said, "We're all friendly to Patrick. We have no animosity toward him. I just wish the kid would straighten up and not take this stand himself. Let him pay someone else to do it."

Although RJR Nabisco is the largest employer in Winston-Salem, with 14,000 workers, residents seem to be largely ignoring Patrick's crusade. Suzanne Brownlow, letters editor of the Winston-Salem Journal, said only one or two people have written the paper so far.

"Regardless of his name, he is a private citizen," she said. "Our readers are too busy worrying about the topless bar they're building downtown."

Title Not Revealed

Reynolds has a contract with publisher Little, Brown & Co. of Boston to write a book, whose title he declined to reveal, with Tom Shachtman, author of "Edith and Woodrow," "The Phony War" and "The FBI-KGB War."

Quoting from the introduction, Patrick said the book "chronicles the creation and dissolution of a great American family fortune" with "episodes of heroism, romance, entrepreneurial genius, business rivalries that shook the nation, political intrigue, multiple and difficult marriages, divorce settlements in the millions, international playboys and gold diggers, blood feuds, suicide-murder, alcoholism and a surfeit of human excess."

The Reynolds brothers' uncle, Z. Smith Reynolds, died of a gunshot wound in 1932 at the age of 20. His wife, Broadway star Libby Holman, was charged with murder, but the charges were dropped at the request of the family.

Book Tells of Loans

The book also said Richard Reynolds Jr., who married four times, made loans that helped Franklin D. Roosevelt win the election of 1940.

Rich Jachetti, a New York public relations consultant for the American Lung Assn., last year invited Reynolds to become the first member of the association's "Celebrity Advisory Board."

"We'll be doing public service announcements with Patrick-probably TV, definitely radio," Jachetti said. "We may also do a poster campaign with him. We're also talking about having Patrick function as a spokesman for the association in schools around the country and on media programs."

Reynolds said he has a great idea for a public service spot: "I'd be looking in the camera, and rather than saying who I am, there'd be a byline saying `Patrick Reynolds: member of the R.J. Reynolds family.' I'd say: `When we began manufacturing cigarettes, we didn't realize they could cause heart disease, emphysema and lung cancer. Stop smoking now.' It'd be very brief."

PHOTO: Patrick Reynolds demonstrates his feelings about the family industry after testifying in Washington. Russell Carr makes his living growing tobacco in Funston, Ga. / Associated Press

Document latm000020011119di8h01qg9

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

LIFE

Tobacco heir crusades against evil of smoking

AP
901 words
19 August 1986
The Toronto Star
FINAL
H2

(Copyright The Toronto Star)

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) - He hands out pictures of himself crushing packs of Camels, blaming smoking for the death of his father and millions of other people. He appears on television talk shows, writes the U.S. president and testifies before a congressional committee, condemning cigarette advertising as immoral.

This tobacco town has seen it all before, except for one thing: This crusader is the grandson of R. J. Reynolds, the founder of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. of Winston-Salem.

"Some people say I'm biting the hand that feeds me," says Patrick Reynolds, a 37-year-old actor who recently came home to Winston-Salem to explain his position to outraged family members. "I say the hand that fed me - the tobacco industry - has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more unless smokers wake up."

Reformed smoker

A reformed smoker, Reynolds' message is the same wherever he can find an audience: Cigarettes have killed 10 million Americans since 1950 and smoking is costing the U.S. economy $65 billion (U.S.) a year in medical care and lost productivity, he says. He urges higher taxes on cigarettes and a ban on cigarette advertising, a $2.3 billion-a-year industry in America.

The tobacco industry claims no link between smoking and disease has ever been proven.

Some of his four brothers say Reynolds' campaign is a publicity stunt for a book he is writing and a television mini-series they fear will make the Reynolds family look like characters from Dallas.

"Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves," says John Reynolds, a 50-year-old Winston-Salem aquaculturalist and Patrick's half-brother. "He's creating an unnecessary stir for his own sake."

But Reynolds says the book and TV plans spring from a need to understand himself and the father he never knew - a father whose death seeded his anti-smoking zeal.

Patrick Reynolds was 9 the first time he remembers meeting his father, Richard Reynolds Jr., the son of patriarch R. J. Reynolds. He had sent a letter asking to meet his father, who divorced Patrick's mother when the boy was 3.

"I was starved for love and affection and thrilled that I was finally going to get to meet this demigod my mother brought me up to believe he was," says Reynolds. "The moment of meeting him was a wonderful thing, except for one thing - he had sandbags on his chest to exercise his lungs. They thought he had been taken by asthma but it turned out to be emphysema, the result of heavy smoking."

His father died at age 58 in 1964, when Patrick was 15.

Minor roles

Ten years later, Patrick himself was smoking, an addiction that lasted another 10 years.

"I'm human," he says. "I fought it. It was a battle to get off cigarettes. I struggled for five years and quit in 1984."

Reynolds inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 in 1969. After studying business and film production in college, he had minor movie roles and stars as a half-robot Mandroid in the new video production, Eliminators. He is also involved in producing, publishing and real estate.

Reynolds says he tried from 1983 to 1985 to get a job with RJR Nabisco Inc. of Winston-Salem, the conglomerate that owns R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. He says company officials at one point mentioned the possibility of his joining the board of directors, where no Reynolds has served since the 1930s.

It was his secret intention, Reynolds says, to work from within the company to get it to divest its tobacco holdings. In any case, the company declined to hire him, and Reynolds began his anti-smoking campaign soon afterwards.

Reynolds has sold his stock in the company, but he has no plans to give back the $2.5 million inheritance.

In May, Reynolds met in Washington with Senator Robert Packwood, chairman of the Senate finance committee.

"I suggested it was shocking that a special interest like cigarettes could get enough support in Congress to keep taxes among the lowest in the world, and that this must arouse the cynicism of the U.S. public in the way this nation is governed," Reynolds says.

A Republican and an admirer of President Ronald Reagan, he recently wrote the president urging his support of a ban on cigarette ads, saying "advertising of these proven killers is plainly immoral."

John Reynolds and another half-brother, 46-year-old William Reynolds of Winston-Salem, also say Patrick is seeking publicity for his acting career, his book and his TV production.

Public service

Michael Reynolds, 39, of Winston-Salem, Patrick's only full brother, said RJR Nabisco stock has actually risen since Patrick spoke out.

A spokesman for the American Lung Association, Patrick Reynolds says he has a great idea for a public service spot.

"I'd be looking in the camera, and rather than saying who I am, there'd be a byline saying, 'Patrick Reynolds: member of the R. J. Reynolds family.' I'd say: 'When we began manufacturing cigarettes, we didn't realize they could cause heart disease, emphysema and lung cancer. Stop smoking now.' It'd be very brief."

CP photo Patrick Reynolds giving thumbs down sign for smoking

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D01

Scott Stapf, Striking Back for Tobacco The Industry's Happy Warrior, Pushing the Cause in Hostile Terrain

Peter S. Canellos
Washington Post Staff Writer
3,841 words
23 August 1986
The Washington Post


Dick Cavett, acting host of CNN's "Larry King Live," to Scott Stapf, director of media relations for the Tobacco Institute: Would you admit that anyone's been killed by smoking?

Stapf: That's not been proven by any court in the country-there've been over 300 cases.

Cavett: Can you-you personally-say no one has died from smoking?

Stapf: I don't know of any case.

Cavett: I guess I can't believe my ears that I've met an adult human being who can look me in the eye slightly unsteadily and say that cigarettes haven't killed anyone ... Would you submit to a polygraph exam?

Stapf: On what I believe, sure.

Cavett: ... is it harmless?

Stapf: There's no evidence it's a harm, no evidence it's good for you.

Cavett, later: You seem like a charming guy. I can see why they hired you for this job. Let me make it clear where I stand on this because people think I should be neutral. I think what you're doing is morally on a plane with working at Auschwitz or pushing drugs. I just can't see how you could accept money for it when you'd have a much clearer conscience if you ran an elevator.

Stapf: I'm very comfortable with my work ...

When he carries the pro-tobacco flag into battle on television or on the speaker's platform, Scott Stapf-the leading national spokesman for the tobacco industry-does not smoke. But back in his office, he often lights up as he settles down to the day's paperwork. He has a strange, no-hands way of smoking in which he sticks the cigarette in his mouth and then puffs in and out for several minutes at a time, cigarette dangling, smoke blowing out like steam from a teakettle.

The paperwork at hand was a report to the Tobacco Institute's member companies about his recent activities. And on this Wednesday, Aug. 13, Stapf had plenty of good news to relay. He had just pulled off a major PR coup.

For Stapf and his employers, 1986 hasn't been exactly the best of times. There's been a proposed ban on cigarette advertising, controversy over allegedly misleading commercials by tobacco companies, proposed bans on smoking in federal and many private offices and a rash of lawsuits by lung-cancer victims against cigarette manufacturers. Now, this morning, the National Academy of Sciences was releasing a report recommending a ban on cigarette smoking on domestic airliners.

But Stapf had beaten NAS to the punch.

Six days earlier, he had obtained a leaked copy of the NAS report, and that had allowed him to go on the offensive. For almost a week, Stapf had memorized his arguments and honed his phrasing for maximum quotability. Smokers were already on "the back of the bus" in airplanes; "The NAS panel report admits that they did not do any in-air testing to confirm their suspicions that tobacco smoke is a problem in airline cabins"; according to a study by the tobacco industry, "you'd have to do eight round trips from New York to Tokyo to be exposed to the nicotine equivalent of one cigarette"; and according to a tobacco industry survey, 82 percent of the flying public is satisfied with the current smoking/nonsmoking system.

He had unveiled these arguments (all of which are disputed by smoking opponents) at a Tuesday press conference, the day before NAS had scheduled one of its own. By revealing news of the proposed ban on airliner smoking himself, Stapf had gotten big play in newspapers across the country. Moreover, reporters, lacking copies of the NAS report, had drawn largely on the information he provided.

This morning, he had already been on "Good Morning America" and "The CBS Morning News"; he was about to head off to the NAS press conference to keep pressing his side of the dispute; and in the evening he would appear on "The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" and "Larry King Live." A good day's work, it would seem-except maybe for the end. On the King show, guest host Dick Cavett ground his heel on Stapf's arguments one by one.

After Stapf went into his "eight round trips to Toyko" speech, Cavett said, "That's nonsense, of course, as anyone who's flown knows ... "

To Stapf's survey results showing 82 percent of the public satisfied with the current system, Cavett said, "Let me point out how you faked that ... "

Later, Stapf called the Cavett program "an anomaly" and the "worst-case circumstance" for a person in his position. It's not every day, to be sure, that PR men get compared to Nazis and dope pushers. But Cavett's lack of objectivity, Stapf added, was not only "very unprofessional"-more important, from a PR perspective, it was ineffective.

"That sort of preaching to the choir," Stapf said, "is not the kind of thing that persuades reasonable observers. All he succeeded in doing was creating sympathy for me."

Stapf's day began just after 7, when a big black car from ABC picked him up from his Cathedral Avenue apartment to take him to the studio for his "Good Morning America" appearance. Dressed in a dark business suit and bright, telegenic tie, he carried a briefcase and a packed suitcase. That night, he was scheduled to fly to New York, where the next morning he was to address executives of Philip Morris, one of the cigarette companies that make up the Tobacco Institute.

This was his second "Good Morning America" stint in less than a month. On July 18, he'd been booked alongside lung-cancer victim Yul Brynner's daughter and Patrick Reynolds, antismoking activist and grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, to debate the proposed advertising ban.

After going to makeup, he read USA Today for the first time that morning (he'd read several other major papers earlier, and was generally pleased with their coverage). "This is why we do what we do," he exclaimed, pointing to a front-page news story using Stapf's statistics and comments and stating that "details of the academy's 18-month study-ordered by Congress-weren't available." The results of Stapf's survey were given prominent attention and highlighted with big black dots.

After the NAS actually released its report, USA Today didn't run a story. "Once we hit it we figured there wasn't any point in hitting it again," explained Ray Gniewek, USA Today Managing Editor, Page One. "The next day it seemed anticlimactic to me."

Both "Good Morning America" and "The CBS Morning News" featured Stapf in an abbreviated debate format with antismoking activist John Banzhaf, head of Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) and a law professor at George Washington University. The two fielded neutral questions from chipper morning anchors Faith Daniels on CBS and Denise Yamada on ABC ("I have a feeling you two are going to disagree on this point as well, but I'm going to ask both of you ..." Daniels began one question).

Though not a PR specialist, Banzhaf can match Stapf quip for quip, finger wag for finger wag. His most publicized moment came while appearing on CBS' "Nightwatch" with another law professor who believed in the right to smoke anytime, anywhere. The other professor, as if to prove his point, lit up a cigar. Banzhaf doused both the stogie and the man's face with a glass of water.

He thinks the Tobacco Institute muddies the water with deceptions about smoking and health, sending professional debaters out around the country to take advantage of less media-wise local health officials. He wouldn't mind, he says, if hired guns like Scott Stapf used their skills "to get people to choose MacDonald's over Burger King," but "when the consequences are illness and death, I think it's despicable."

Stapf, for his part, seems to thrive on television interviewers who lob neutral questions at him and leave his answers uncontested except by the person he is debating. The usual talk-show format gives the tobacco industry's surveys and contentions an equivalence with those on the other side-a scientific credibility that most smoking critics say they don't deserve.

"Good Morning America" and "The CBS Morning News" were not exceptions. There was no water-throwing on either show this morning, and at least in the opinion of his coworkers, Stapf-who has debated since high school-got the best of Banzhaf twice in a row.

At 28, Scott Stapf is something of a PR prodigy, a newcomer to the profession with the shrewd instincts and almost inhuman self-control of a natural. Stout, with slightly thinning hair and a soft, doughy face, Stapf does not look like a boy wonder; it is very easy to take him for a man 10 years older. But his appearance is appropriate for his position and his message. On television and at press conferences, a more boyish-looking man might come across as brash.

Beneath the smooth surface, Stapf has many of the common attributes of a Washington whiz kid: boundless energy, a love for his job and a barely concealed pride that his smarts could bring such rewards in such a short time in so grand a theater.

Sitting in his large, plush I Street office ("almost as big as my apartment"), a copy of Tom Goldstein's "The News at Any Cost: How Journalists Compromise Their Ethics to Shape the News" on his coffee table, Stapf traces his skill to his own days as a state-government reporter for the Bismarck, N.D., Tribune. "I never took a course in PR," he says. "What I've learned is what I've learned from reporting: what reporters want, what they need, what's good enough for them and what isn't, deadlines ...

"I liked being a reporter," he adds. "Most of my friends are reporters. In a way my career has gone from looking for good sources to being a good source."

At the Tribune, Stapf is remembered as an astute reporter who knew his way around state government. "He was extremely bright and mature beyond his years," says the paper's assistant editor, Larry Johnson. "I knew he'd do well and I guess I was right."

His PR training actually began well before he got his first newspaper job. Stapf spent many of his high school and college years (at Macalester College in his home state of Minnesota) practicing speech and debate. At extemporaneous speech competitions, Stapf would pull a topic out of a hat and start speaking on it. For original oratory he would write and memorize a speech and be graded on the effectiveness of his presentation. In debate, he covered such topics as creating a global program for rationing precious metals and changing the presidential system.

At Macalester, he worked as a stringer for the Winona (Minn.) Daily News, and he began writing full time immediately after graduation. But he left journalism when his wife, Laurie Boeder, got a job as press secretary to Sen. Quentin Burdick (D-N.D.) and the couple moved to Washington.

After "combing the want ads" for several months, he landed an entry-level position at the PR consulting firm of Rosapepe, Powers and Spanos, where he drew on his experience as a state government reporter to help state tax commissioners get their perspectives into news stories. Stapf still has a bumper sticker, pinned to his office bulletin board, proclaiming "I paid more taxes than GE"-a memory of the days when big business was his target (though he's quick to point out that the tobacco industry is heavily taxed).

He was hired as one of four roving spokesmen for the Tobacco Institute roughly a year ago, and was so effective that he became director of media relations in May.

He describes his political views as middle-of-the-road "with a bit of a libertarian streak." And indeed, it's the libertarian in him that seems to speak most eloquently when Stapf approaches a microphone.

When discussing topics not related to civil liberties-such as the medical evidence against cigarette smoking-he sounds like a stereotype of a PR man-overtalking, evading questions, tossing out confusing scientific terms, qualifying every answer. But when he picks up the mantle of the people and starts talking about "the right to smoke," he starts sounding a little like a modern-day Tom Paine.

He rarely misses a chance to compare the current assault on smoking with Prohibition, and he has a Tobacco Institute researcher combing the National Archives for old footage of prudish, Bible-thumping Prohibitionists ("real loonies," says the researcher).

"These types of people have always rankled me-the moralists, the preachers, the bluenoses," Stapf says. "I'm not saying they aren't sincere, but it's the way they operate that I find very objectionable, the idea that they don't like something, so it should be a point of law, that no one else should be able to do something they object to."

But the call for a ban on cigarette advertising, he believes, has actually helped the pro-smoking cause. "It shifted the debate about cigarettes in general into the area of free speech, commercial speech and the First Amendment," he says-thus creating a PR bonanza for the tobacco industry.

As for his own beliefs about smoking, Stapf insists that he personally agrees with everything he's ever said on behalf of the Tobacco Institute. He acknowledges that studies show higher-than-normal incidences of certain diseases among smokers, but he maintains that there is no evidence to show that smoking actually causes disease. Hearing the complicated, technical argument in Stapf's silky, calm, reasonable voice, it's somehow harder than it should be to doubt.

He denies, however, that his comments either persuade people to start smoking or discourage them from quitting, pointing to another survey-this one showing that 95 percent of the public believes smoking causes lung cancer-to buttress his claim.

"I frankly am not convinced that what I say to express the industry position causes people to click off their TVs and run out and buy cigarettes," he says, setting up the debater's straw man. "As a legal industry, we have every right in the world to respond to criticism ... "

When Stapf took over as media relations director he brought with him no credo, no guiding principles of PR, save one: "If a reporter doesn't know you from Adam, you can expect to be treated badly."

To that end, many of his efforts are aimed at opening up contacts with reporters. The Tobacco Institute now has a toll-free phone number that reporters can call at all hours of the day for comment from Tobacco Institute spokesmen.

Stapf has a big map of the United States on his wall with thumbtacks marking cities to be visited by institute personnel this year; during the week the airplane issue heated up, he had speakers in Tampa, Phoenix and southern Maine. "We're planning on spending more time on the road in second-tier markets, sometimes with experts," he says. The experts would supply horse's-mouth testimonials to buttress tobacco industry positions.

Stapf is also stepping up outreach efforts aimed at reporters and editors at small and middle-sized newspapers. He is working to identify which reporters and editors would most likely be responsible for smoking-related issues. "You can mail 1,000 pieces of mail, but if they fall into the wrong hands, they're useless," he says, noting that there are only 1,037 newspapers in the country with circulations greater than 10,000-"a manageable-sized group."

"But for all the fine talk about strategy," he adds, "it really comes down to gut-fighting." Which is what Stapf has been doing on the national level.

The NAS-recommended ban on in-flight smoking is typical. Stapf says he had been fishing for information about the NAS study for the past few months, knowing that the NAS committee was nearing completion of its work. He says he suspected that the committee would call for a smoking ban but didn't know for sure until someone, probably a scientist who was mailed an advance copy of the report as part of the NAS peer review system, leaked him a copy.

That set the wheels in motion. "We heard about it Thursday," Stapf says. "We started to pull things together on Friday. I wrote most of the materials {handouts for reporters} on Sunday and Sunday night and we went through a review process on Monday."

The information consisted largely of a previously unreleased study by Guy Oldaker, a scientist for the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, measuring nicotine levels in airplanes (the "eight round trips to Tokyo" study), and the highly controversial Tobacco Institute survey claiming that 82 percent of the public favored the current system.

Both studies raised obvious questions. The nicotine study, conducted by measuring the nicotine content of air sucked through a small tube into a specially equipped briefcase, had not yet been reviewed by other scientists (though it has been submitted to a scientific journal). Furthermore, NAS scientists say that nicotine content in the air is not a reliable measure of air quality; nicotine dissipates too quickly, they say, and carbon monoxide from cigarette smoke is considered at least as great a health risk to fliers.

As for the opinion poll, the actual question put to fliers was phrased, "As you know, government regulations require separate seating sections on airplanes for smokers and nonsmokers. Do you think this present arrangement works pretty well in making all passengers comfortable, or should this arrangement be changed in some way?" Critics contend that respondents could easily have thought that the "change" referred to was lumping smokers and nonsmokers together, not banning smoking.

Nonetheless, Stapf packaged this information with a quotable printed statement of his own ("the NAS panel's recommendation does not fly and should be grounded permanently"), arranged for Oldaker to appear at the press conference with him, and even brought the specially outfitted briefcase to the press conference as a prop ("a James Bond device," he called it).

At the Tuesday press conference, held before roughly 30 reporters and eight television cameras in the Margaret Bourke-White Room of the National Press Club, Stapf stepped in front of the American flag, read his prepared statement and answered questions, as smoke from reporters' cigarettes stood out sharply against the klieg lights.

In the question period, Stapf exaggerated the information in the surveys. "Eighty-two percent of the public is completely satisfied with the present system," he said of the 82 percent who had said they were "satisfied" that the system worked "pretty well." He also maintained that "Quite simply, the NAS did not conduct systematic in-air tests for cigarette smoke," but did not mention that the NAS panel was a review panel not commissioned to do original research.

After showing off the briefcase, Oldaker explained the results of his survey. A reporter for National Public Radio then said, "As I recall, the real hazards of environmental smoke are noxious fumes such as carbon monoxide ... " After Oldaker, seeming a little flustered, repeated, "We tested nicotine in the environment ... " Stapf stepped forward. Nicotine was just "used as a marker," he said, adding that this was the standard measure of environmental smoke hazards and "not new." His statements were disclaimed by NAS panel members the next day, but they were enough to satisfy most reporters and keep doubts about the R.J. Reynolds survey out of most newspapers.

On Wednesday, after finishing his first two talk shows, Stapf spent the rest of the morning answering questions from the print media and preparing his report on the success of Tuesday's press conference. At 11 a.m., he crashed the NAS press conference.

This event differed in a number of ways from the Tobacco Institute's presentation the previous day. For one thing, the reporters didn't smoke. More important, the three panel members present (representing nine others) were academics, and most of the answers were qualified and wordy; the panelists provided a fat report of 303 printed pages, but nonetheless said there were many areas in which they wished they had more data.

Despite the numerous studies and opinion polls mentioned in the report, reporters' questions focused mainly on the Tobacco Institute data and contentions. Thomas Chalmers, panel chairman and president emeritus of Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, began by saying, "This is an unusual press conference because some of what we're releasing has already been in the press. I hope the press will pay attention to our 18 months of work ... "

Standing in the back of the room, Stapf held court after the official press conference ended. Dropping in on the other guy's party, he says, is not a new tactic for the Tobacco Institute: "When {Congressman} Mike Synar announced his call for an ad ban, we showed up at his press conference and did interviews right there so we were featured pretty prominently in those stories."

Members of the NAS panel say they were surprised that Stapf got hold of their report, but they weren't surprised by anything else he said or did.

"They are not bound by the same rules of science and causation you find in a scientific community," says panel vice chairman John Spengler, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. "They feel they're in a social war and have to fight hard for the positions they believe in."

After the NAS event ended, Stapf held a lunch meeting with his staff, then reviewed videotapes of his morning interviews as well as television news reports on the airliner smoking ban. He made notes on the newscasts he thought failed to present the Tobacco Institute position and told his secretary to place phone calls to the reporters responsible.

Later, after a little more paperwork, there was MacNeil/Lehrer, the King show, and a plane to New York. It had been a killer day-but it's the kind of day Stapf loves, the kind he hopes to see many more of.

"I feel like I'm accomplishing something here," he says. "It's a really challenging job under what are on a day-to-day basis very trying circumstances. I really thrive on it, the energy I run into every day. There is clash and there is controversy and there is energy." GRAPHICS/One: Scott Stapf. GRAPHICS/Two: Dick Cavettt, left, with John Banzhaf or Action on Smoking and Health and Scott Stapf of the Tobacco Institute.

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BUSINESS

ANTISMOKING CRUSADE BY REYNOLDS HEIR

The Associated Press
720 words
26 August 1986
The Record, Northern New Jersey
All Editions.=.Bergen South. Bergen North. Bergen.; Passaic-Morris
d09


He hands out pictures of himself crushing packs of Camels, blaming smoking for the death of his father and millions of other people. He appears on television talk shows, writes the president, and testifies before a congressional committee, condemning cigarette advertising as immoral.

This tobacco town has seen it all before, except for one thing: This crusader is the grandson of R. J. Reynolds, the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company of Winston-Salem.

"Some people say I'm biting the hand that feeds me," says Patrick Reynolds, a 37-year-old actor who recently came home to Winston-Salem to explain his position to outraged family members. "I say the hand that fed me _ the tobacco industry _ has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more unless smokers wake up." A reformed smoker himself, Reynold's message is the same wherever he can find an audience: Cigarettes have killed 10 million Americans since 1950, and smoking is costing the U.S. economy $65 billion a year in medical care and lost productivity. He urges higher taxes on cigarettes and a ban on cigarette advertising, a $2.3-billion-a-year industry.

The tobacco industry claims no link between smoking and disease has ever been proven.

Some of his four brothers say Reynolds's campaign is a publicity stunt for a book he is writing and a television miniseries they fear will make the Reynolds family look like characters from "Dallas." `Spinning in their graves'

"Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves," says John D. Reynolds, 50 years old and Patrick's half brother. "He's creating an unnecessary stir for his own sake." Another half brother, 46-year-old William N. Reynolds of Winston-Salem, also says Patrick is seeking publicity

But Reynolds says the book and TV plans spring from a need to understand himself and the father he never knew _ a father whose death seeded his anti-smoking zeal.

Patrick Reynolds was 9 years old the first time he remembers meeting his father, Richard Reynolds Jr., the son of patriarch R. J. Reynolds. He had sent a letter asking to meet his father, who divorced Patrick's mother when the boy was 3.

"I was starved for love and affection and thrilled that I was finally going to get to meet this demigod my mother brought me up to believe he was," says Reynolds. "The moment of meeting him was a wonderful thing, except for one thing _ he had sandbags on his chest to exercise his lungs. They thought he had been taken by asthma, but it turned out to be emphysema _ the result of heavy smoking." His father died at age 58 in 1964, when Patrick was 15.

Ten years later, Patrick himself was smoking _ an addiction that lasted another 10 years.

"I'm human," he says. "I fought it. It was a battle to get off cigarettes. I struggled for five years and quit in 1984." Reynolds inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 in 1969. After studying business and film production in college, he had movie roles in "Nashville" and "Airplane." He is also involved in producing, publishing, and real estate. Tried to join RJR Nabisco

Reynolds says he tried from 1983 to 1985 to get a job with RJR Nabisco Inc. of Winston-Salem, the conglomerate that owns the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. He says company officials at one point mentioned the possibility of his joining the board of directors _ where no Reynolds has served since the 1930's.

It was his secret intention, Reynolds says, to work from within the company to get it to divest its tobacco holdings. In any case, the company declined to hire him, and Reynolds began his antismoking campaign soon afterwards.

Reynolds has sold his stock in the company, but he has no plans to give back the $2.5-million inheritance.

In July, Reynolds testfied before a House committee investigating cigarette advertising aimed at women and young people.

"We're all friendly to Patrick," says John Reynolds. "We have no animosity toward him. I just wish the kid would straighten up and not take this stand himself. Let him pay someone else to do it."

 

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PEOPLE

R.J. Reynolds Heir Says Cigarettes Kill

TOM MINEHART
ASSOCIATED PRESS
1,314 words
27 August 1986
The San Francisco Chronicle
FINAL
19


Winston-Salem, N.C.

He hands out pictures of himself crushing packs of Camels, blaming smoking for the death of his father and millions of other people. He appears on television talk shows, writes the president, and testifies before a congressional committee, condemning cigaret advertising as immoral.

This tobacco town has seen it all before, except for one thing: This crusader is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds, the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. of Winston-Salem.

"Some people say I'm biting the hand that feeds me," says Patrick Reynolds, a 37-year-old actor who recently came home to Winston-Salem to explain his position to outraged family members. "I say the hand that fed me - the tobacco industry - has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more unless smokers wake up."

A reformed smoker himself, Reynold's message is the same wherever he can find an audience: Cigarets have killed 10 million Americans since 1950 and smoking is costing the U.S. economy $65 billion a year in medical care and lost productivity. He urges higher taxes on cigarets and a ban on cigaret advertising, a $2.3 billion-a-year industry.

The tobacco industry claims no link between smoking and disease has ever been proven.

Some of his four brothers say Reynolds' campaign is a publicity stunt for a book he is writing and a television miniseries they fear will make the Reynolds family look like characters from "Dallas."

"Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves," says John D. Reynolds, a 50-year-old Winston-Salem aquaculturalist and Patrick's half-brother. "He's creating an unnecessary stir for his own sake."

But Reynolds says the book and TV plans spring from a need to understand himself and the father he never knew - a father whose death seeded his anti-smoking zeal.

Patrick Reynolds was 9 years old the first time he remembers meeting his father, Richard Reynolds Jr., the son of patriarch R.J. Reynolds. He had sent a letter asking to meet his father, who divorced Patrick's mother when the boy was 3.

"I was starved for love and affection and thrilled that I was finally going to get to meet this demigod my mother brought me up to believe he was," says Reynolds. "The moment of meeting him was a wonderful thing, except for one thing - he had sandbags on his chest to exercise his lungs. They thought he had been taken by asthma, but it turned out to be emphysema - the result of heavy smoking." His father died at age 58 in 1964, when Patrick was 15.

Ten years later, Patrick himself was smoking - an addiction that lasted another 10 years.

"I'm human," he says. "I fought it. It was a battle to get off cigarets. I struggled for five years and quit in 1984."

Reynolds inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 in 1969. After studying business and film production in college, he had movie roles in "Nashville" and "Airplane," and he stars as a half-robot "Mandroid" in the new video production "Eliminators." He is also involved in producing, publishing and real estate.

Reynolds says he tried from 1983 to 1985 to get a job with RJR Nabisco Inc. of Winston-Salem, the conglomerate that owns R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. He says company officials at one point mentioned the possibility of his joining the board of directors - where no Reynolds has served since the 1930s.

It was his secret intention, Reynolds says, to work from within the company to get it to divest its tobacco holdings. In any case, the company declined to hire him, and Reynolds began his anti-smoking campaign soon afterwards.

Reynolds has sold his stock in the company, but he has no plans to give back the $2.5 million inheritance.

In May, Reynolds met in Washington with Sen. Robert Packwood, R-Ore., chairman of the Senate Finance Committee.

"I suggested it was shocking that a special interest like cigarets could get enough support in Congress to keep taxes among the lowest in the world, and that this must arouse the cynicism of the U.S. public in the way this nation is governed," Reynolds says.

In July, Reynolds testified before a House committee investigating cigaret advertising aimed at women and young people.

A Republican and an admirer of President Reagan's, he recently wrote the president urging his support of a ban on cigaret ads, saying "advertising of these proven killers in plainly immoral."

John D. Reynolds, and another half-brother, 46-year-old William N. Reynolds of Winston-Salem, say Patrick is seeking publicity for his acting career, his book and his TV production.

A third half-brother, 52-year-old Richard "Josh" Reynolds III of Southern Pines, says he's disturbed Patrick is pushing for higher cigaret taxes because, "I don't support higher taxes for anything."

STOCK IS UP

Michael Reynolds, 39, of Winston-Salem, Patrick's only full brother, said RJR Nabisco stock has actually risen since Patrick spoke out.

`I don't like the idea he's going to try to do a `Dallas'-type program of very wealthy Reynoldses walking around in a made-for-TV movie, surrounded by beautiful women," John Reynolds says. "Most Reynoldses don't have much money relative to what people think."

He disputed Patrick's contention that their father died from cigarets, saying he actually died from pneumonia he caught while racing yachts.

Later, John said, "We're all friendly to Patrick. We have no animosity toward him. I just wish the kid would straighten up and not take this stand himself. Let him pay someone else to do it."

Although RJR Nabisco is the largest employer in Winston-Salem, with 14,000 workers, residents seem to be largely ignoring Patrick's crusade. Suzanne Brownlow, letters editor of the Winston-Salem Journal, says only one or two people have written the paper so far.

"Regardless of his name, he is a private citizen," she said. "Our readers are too busy worrying about the topless bar they're building downtown."

Reynolds has a contract with publisher Little, Brown and Co. of Boston to write a book, whose title he declined to reveal, with Tom Shachtman, author of "Edith and Woodrow," "The Phony War" and "The FBI-KGB War."

CREATION AND DISSOLUTION

Quoting from the introduction, Patrick says the book "chronicles the creation and dissolution of a great American family" with "episodes of heroism, romance, entrepreneurial genius, business rivalries that shook the nation, political intrigue, multiple and difficult marriages, divorce settlements in the millions, international playboys and gold diggers, blood feuds, suicide-murder, alcoholism and a surfeit of human excess."

Rich Jachetti, a New York public relations consultant for the American Lung Association, last year invited Reynolds to become the first member of the association's "Celebrity Advisory Board."

"We'll be doing public service announcements with Patrick - probably TV, definitely radio," Jachetti says. "We may also do a poster campaign with him. We're also talking about having Patrick function as a spokesman for the association in schools around the country and on media programs."

Reynolds says he has a great idea for a public service spot: "I'd be looking in the camera, and rather than saying who I am, there'd be a byline saying `Patrick Reynolds: member of the R.J. Reynolds family.' I'd say: `When we began manufacturing cigarets, we didn't realize they could cause heart disease, emphysema and lung cancer. Stop smoking now.' It'd be very brief."

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOTO; Caption: Patrick Reynolds throws cigarets into the trash in Washington after speaking against smoking at a House health and environment subcommittee / BY ASSOCIATED PRESS

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NORTHWEST

TOBACCO HEIR HERE AS BITTER FOE OF SMOKING

CHARLES E. BROWN, WARREN KING
439 words
26 October 1986
The Seattle Times
SUNDAY
B2


Patrick Reynolds says he is wise enough to have kicked a pack-a-day cigarette habit. But he is not so foolish as to turn his back on a $2.5 million inheritance that grew out of his grandfather's tobacco fields.

Reynolds, 37, grandson and an heir of R.J. Reynolds, the late tobacco magnate, says he has been accused of ``biting the hand that feeds me'' with his outspoken, public anti-smoking crusade.

``On the contrary,'' he counters, ``I'm bringing my life full circle. The hand that fed me _ the tobacco industry _ has literally killed millions of people and may kill millions more. This is a personal matter with me.''

Although Reynolds never knew his grandfather, he admits he is probably the antithesis of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. founder, who turned a small North Carolina tobacco factory into a fortune and became a major force in popularizing cigarettes. (The company, with which Patrick Reynolds has no business ties, is the second-largest cigarette-maker in the United States.)

Reynolds, in Seattle to participate in an anti-smoking campaign, says part of the impetus for his present anti-smoking crusade stems from a shallow, brief relationship with his father, R.J. Reynolds Jr. The youngest of two sons from the second of his father's four marriages, Patrick Reynolds says he doesn't recall meeting his father until the age of 9.

``By then, my dad was seriously ill and bedridden with pulmonary emphysema, and he always blamed it in part on his own lifelong cigarette habit.

``I never once got to play ball with him, and I only got to see him a handful of times.''

While growing up with a lifestyle of the rich and famous, Reynolds says personal turmoils _ including his father's death at the age of 58 _ had a profound emotional impact on his teen-age years.

A part of his teen-age rebellion, he says, was to take up smoking. ``I guess I wanted to hurt others by hurting myself,'' he said. ``And I wanted to look big by doing what the rest of the crowd was doing.''

But Reynolds says he remained haunted by his father's debilitating illness, ``and I guess I matured enough to realize what smoking was doing to me.''

Reynolds, in Seattle to participate in an anti-smoking program, has outraged family members and thrilled anti-smoking forces by becoming a spokesman for the American Lung Association and by letting the association use his face in promotions.

PHOTO; Caption: SMK

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NEWS

PEOPLE

Edited by Al Cohn
1,331 words
2 November 1986
Newsday
ALL EDITIONS
09

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1986)

THE QUIZ

1. Considering the team effort, the World Series' MVP award might have been renamed to honor the Mets' Valuable Players. Instead, the Most Valuable Player in the Mets' victory over Boston was quite a story himself. After almost being dropped in the spring, he had a good season and came back from a critical error in the Series' sixth game to lead the team. Name him.

2. Lynette Hoglund, 22, is a former model, championship freestyle skier and author of a book on Alaskan seafood. Last weekend in Manhattan, she accomplished a notable first that had nothing to do with any of those previous endeavors. What did she become?

3. This prominent playwright has been dealing with his early years in his recent shows, "Brighton Beach Memoirs" and "Biloxi Blues." A third play, "Broadway Bound," opened to good reviews in Washington, D. C., and is truly Broadway bound, with previews starting later this month. Who is he?

4. After surviving eight months and 3,235 miles of awful living conditions and financial problems that almost cut the journey short, 400 persons crossed the George Washington Bridge before last weekend with a feeling of mission accomplished, although Washington, D. C., was the final goal. Name the event.

5. Mary Wilson still sings professionally and works in Hollywood, but her biggest showbiz years were the 1960s with a fabled Motown trio from Detroit. Her new book, "Dreamgirl," tells the bitter and tragic side of the story of that group and those years. What is the book's subtitle? ANSWERS: 1. Ray Knight. 2. The youngest woman to hold a New York Stock Exchange seat. 3. Neil Simon. 4. The Great Peace March for Global Nuclear Disarmament. 5. "My Life as a Supreme." QUOTABLES

Now we can be as cocky as we want to be.

- The Mets' Mookie Wilson, after the team that was widely disliked by other clubs for what was perceived as arrogance won the World Series.

The Marx Brothers version of the United Nations, where Tibetan monks are encouraged to learn to belly dance and American playwrights are bullied to abandon their fraught obsessions with western narcissism.

- Composer-author Elizabeth Swados' description of the La Mama Experimental Theater, now in its 25th anniversary year.

I did not want to earn my money from people smoking cigarettes and dying.

- Patrick Reynolds, on why he divested himself of all stock in the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. He is the grandson of the company's founder, and is an anti-smoking activist.

I have to talk to my other pilot and we're going to have to carefully evaluate what we're doing and ask ourselves some searching questions, like, "Are we crazy to be up there?"

- Neil Busch, a helicopter pilot and a traffic reporter for WCBS-AM radio, on the helicopter-crash death of NBC-AM radio traffic reporter Jane Dornacker.

It's Kitty Kelley who is writing fiction, and I'm the one who is telling the truth.

- Novelist Jackie Collins, who supposedly invents Hollywood bedroom goings-on, referring to the Frank Sinatra biographer.

Fans tuning in to top stars

To paraphrase a Barbra Streisand song from "Funny Girl," who are, by far, the greatest stars in Hollywood?

It is a tricky question, because talent can have little to do with the answer. Box-office receipts are not necessarily a gauge, due to offsetting factors such as the co-stars, the director and the quality of the film. Nor are TV ratings an accurate measure, especially in large casts where there may be a half-dozen featured stars.

One indication can be magazine covers and tabloids, with their implications of financial, sexual and professional misconduct by celebrated performers. Other barometers are the opinions of agents, producers and executives, professionals with instincts about who's hot and who's not.

As it happens, industry experts agree that the biggest stars are in Hollywood - but they are shooting TV shows, not movies. Insiders say the top names are Bill Cosby, Michael J. Fox (more through TV than movies), Tom Selleck and Larry Hagman. And they say that the most popular actresses are on the same weekly show, "Dynasty," - Joan Collins and Linda Evans.

A recent United Press International survey of behind-the-scenes Hollywood showbiz figures also revealed that the leading movie stars are Sylvester Stallone, Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Tom Cruise and Fox, with such female film stars as Meryl Streep, Jane Fonda, Sally Field, Goldie Hawn and Kathleen Turner failing to fare as well in popularity as the men.

And the TV stars outrank them all. One film and TV producer told UPI, "You take any two movie stars you want - male or female - and book them into a theater in any city you choose. I'll book Linda {Evans} and Joan {Collins} in a theater across the street, and I'll outdraw you ten to one."

Evans starred in a miniseries, "The Last Frontier," last month. Collins starred earlier this year in the miniseries, "Sins," and is a headliner in the new miniseries, "Monte Carlo" - both of which she produced. The two stars also have cashed in on TV commercials and endorsements of products such as perfumes, jewelry, diet drinks and health spas.

It is estimated that Collins, 53, and Evans, 43, earn more than $ million a year each from salaries and endorsements.

Collins is proud of her accomplishments. "I am the only actress in a prime-time series who starred in two major miniseries in the same year," she told UPI. "I hope people won't overdose on Joan Collins."

She said she has no desire to return to movies, where she would have little control over her roles and production. "Who wants to be a movie star? Not when you can produce and star in your own TV movies and miniseries for a much larger audience. It's no contest. Films today are slanted basically toward a teenage audience or Stallone-type movies where people get beat up - blood and guts and four-letter words."

"I don't want that sort of thing. I much prefer television, where I can come into people's living rooms and be in a show that I'm proud of. Also there is the security of knowing I'm going to work week after week. I want my cake and I want to eat it, too, and that's just what I'm doing."

Collins said she is "grateful for everything I have in my life. Believe it or not, I've had a lot of tragedy in my time. Only in the past few years have I lived as well or enjoyed so much. Perhaps it's because God has said, `Okay, Joan, we're going to give you all this now because maybe you deserve it.' " Stage is set for another Olivier

When will children learn to listen to their parents? Oh, well. Tamsin Olivier did listen when her father advised her, "Anything else, do anything, but not acting." But now she has gone out and done precisely what she wanted to do all along: launch a stage career in London.

After all, her father is Sir Laurence Olivier. And her mother is the distinguished British actress, Joan Plowright. Tamsin Olivier, 22, hopes to make it on her own and considered changing her name, perhaps to "Tamsin Smith," People magazine quoted her as saying. "But what was the point? They would have found out anyway, and underneath it they would have put `Lord Olivier's daughter.' "

1) AP Photo - SHARE OF THE LOOT: Judy Sojourner, left, and Sandy Dunn show off part of their share of treasures from wreck of the Atocha, a Spanish galleon found near Key West by treasure hunter Mel Fisher. Fisher's investors and employees started receiving shares last week. 2) Photos - Tamsin Olivier. 2) Joan Collins. 3) Bill Cosby. 4) Linda Evans. 5) Michael J. Fox

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Editorial

A voice to heed

120 words
9 December 1986
The Globe and Mail
A6

All material copyright Thomson Canada Limited or its licensors. All rights reserved.

The case against smoking is now so strong, so widely known, so firmly supported by medical evidence that it is hard to see how the message could be more persuasively conveyed. On the other hand, there is Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the man who founded the tobacco company of the same name.

Mr. Reynolds carries grim recollections of his father struggling for breath before succumbing to emphysema at the age of 58. The memory has driven him to undertake an urgent, high profile crusade against smoking throughout the United States.

Other members of the Reynolds family may consider this to be a kind of betrayal. We see it as a remarkable and entirely humanitarian gesture.

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HOUSTON
Big City Beat

Hart keeps busy with Reynolds PR

MAXINE MESINGER
Staff
787 words
19 December 1986
Houston Chronicle
NO STAR
1


FRIDAY FLASHES: Ex-Houstonian Barbara Hart has settled down in LA and is on tobacco heir Patrick Reynolds Jr.'s PR staff. Reynolds is the fella who has waged a continuous campaign against smoking, even though tobacco must be the side his bread's buttered on. Hart says it's an exciting place to work because Reynolds' fight against the evils of tobacco have gotten him scheduled on an upcoming ``20/20'' on ABC and a segment of Robin Leach's Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, and a miniseries is being made about him. In addition to all that, Reynolds is writing a book. Hart will fly to Houston on Christmas Eve to spend the holidays with her mom, Charlotte Hart, who runs Hart's Galleries' store in the Four Seasons, and her brother and sis-in-law, Hart's Galleries' Jerry and Wynonne Hart. . .Marvin Davis is planning to spend $40 million to refurbish the Beverly Hills Hotel when he takes control of it in the next few weeks.

As has been reported, Davis paid $135 million for the hotel, which long ago was nicknamed the Pink Palace. Regular patrons of the hotel from all over the country are sending congrats to Davis and his wife, Barbara. When Davis sold 20th Century-Fox to Rupert Murdoch some time ago, pals predicted he wouldn't stay out of show-biz action long, and there's no place with more show-biz action than the Beverly Hills Hotel. . .

SLOW DOWN FOR THE LOWDOWN: Houston author Catherine Lanigan has sent her latest novel, ``The Wade Woman,'' to her publisher, and we can expect to see it on the bookshelves late next year. Lanigan authored the novelized adaptations of the movies ``Jewel of the Nile ''and ``Romancing the Stone,'' which starred Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner. However, Lanigan is apparently never too busy to cook, and at her Christmas party last week, she had everything catered except the desserts, which she made herself - seven of them, all so gooey and marvelous, one could gain weight just looking at 'em. Incidentally, Lanigan will be featured in the March issue of Cosmopolitan. . .

ANOTHER HOUSTON author, Linda West Eckhardt, has wound up the press tour for her new book, ``Satisfaction Guaranteed,'' and is home in time for the holidays. Home these days is Ashland, Ore., where she, her husband, former Houston psychiatrist Dr. Joe Eckhardt, and their son, Jay, moved some time ago. ``Satisfaction'' is Linda's fourth book. She got her writing start on the staff of Texas Monthly. . .Wei Li ``Willy'' Wang would like to do a marble bust of the late Princess Grace of Monaco to present to Prince Rainier and the rest of the royal family. Since protocol prohibits the family commissioning Wang to do the sculpture, he and his friend, composer Leslie Bricusse, are seeking investors to commission it and then present it to the royal family. Bricusse also was instrumental in helping Wang present his bronze of Cary Grant to the actor before he died. Another sculpture Wang wants to do is a large-scale monument for Houston, which would commemorate the city's heritage from its inception to modern day. He's talking to city officials about that. Wang, a native of Peking, has been in the United States for three years on a cultural exchange at the request of the American Embassy in China - two of those years have been spent in Houston. . .

THE MAX MEOWS: Nancye Radman will open her first Forgotten Woman shop in Houston in February in the Galleria 3. She has 17 of the stores, which are devoted to larger gals and which boast high- fashion clothes. When Nancye was awarded the National Retail Merchant of the Year in NY, she uttered this oh-so-true statement: ``Thin is in, but fat is where it's at!'' She'll be in Houston for the opening and will headquarter at the Remington on Post Oak Park. . .Real estater Nancy Owens, who recently formed her own Nancy Owens Properties, was an item over lunch at the Houstonian's Manor House with her financial adviser, Marcia Elefant, and her ad agent, Connie Voss. They were celebrating Owens' appearance in the December issue of Money magazine. . .Bari Mintz's best fella, Butch Novy, hosted her surprise birthday party at the Macrobiotic Center, and its owner, Catherine Campise, fed them pasta salad, brown rice, yams and other healthy items. Bari's parents, Carl and Sally Waldman, came in from Beaumont for the party, and Bari's sis and brother-in-law, Houston's Suzi and Elliot Gerstenhaber, also were in the group. . .

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1
NATIONAL BRIEFS

NATIONAL BRIEFS

Houston Chronicle News Services
720 words
11 January 1987
Houston Chronicle
3 STAR
3

5 children die in fire

ERIE, Pa. - Five children died Saturday after fire swept through their home, and firefighters said they had trouble finding the staircase to the youngsters' bedrooms because it was hidden by smoke and a closed door. Erie Coroner Merle Wood said the children, ranging in age from 2 to 11, died of asphyxiation due to smoke inhalation and carbon monoxide poisoning.

Late astronaut honored

JACKSON, Miss. - A planetarium theater here was dedicated Saturday in honor of Challenger astronaut Ronald McNair, who during his first space shuttle mission helped film a planetarium documentary. McNair's widow, Cheryl, thanked the more than 1,000 Jackson residents who turned out for the ceremony, in which officials unveiled a portrait of McNair, one of seven astronauts killed in the Jan. 28, 1985, space shuttle explosion.

Doctors refuse cases

MIAMI - A job action by doctors protesting the highest malpractice rates in the nation has spread to more than a third of Dade County's hospitals, hampering efforts to provide emergency care, doctors and fire officials say. So far, the refusal by some doctors to perform emergency room surgery hasn't harmed a trauma victim, but daily changes in the status of hospitals is delaying transport times for ambulance teams, officials said.

Burns fatal to hero

NEW YORK - A police officer who was severely burned when he rushed into a blazing apartment building to warn its occupants died of his injuries Saturday, police said. Francis LaSala, 33, died at the burn center of New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, where he had been treated for second and third degree burns over 40 to 50 percent of his body.

Honors planned

BALTIMORE - Some of the people living near a railroad track who helped survivors and rescue personnel after the Amtrak crash that killed 15 people last Sunday have been invited to the White House to be honored for their deeds. The White House ceremony will involve 15 to 25 people whose exploits were reported in the press, a spokeswoman said. She said plans are to have them spend 10 or 15 minutes with President Reagan. No date has been set.

Big band vocalist dies

KIRKLAND, Wash. - Marion Hutton Schoen, former lead vocalist for the Glenn Miller Orchestra who spent the last two decades helping other women alcoholics, died Saturday at her home after a long bout with cancer. She was 67. Schoen joined Miller's band in 1939 and performed with him until he joined the Army Air Corps.

Heir urges tobacco suits

BOSTON - People suffering ill health from smoking should call their lawyers and sue the tobacco manufacturers, a grandson of the founder of one of America's largest tobacco companies said Saturday. When lawyers and doctors ``share the belief that, by working together to hold the tobacco industry legally responsible for the death and disease which it causes, the (anti-smoking) fight might actually be won,'' Patrick Reynolds told lawyers at a national conference on tobacco suits.

O'Connor returns to U.S.

NEW YORK - Cardinal John O'Connor returned from his controversial trip to the Middle East Saturday, saying prospects for peace in the troubled region are good and the Vatican is eager to participate in peace initiatives. O'Connor said he was discouraged by American stereotypes of Arabs and Jews that surfaced when he announced his visit to Israel and Jordan.

Trial to resume Monday

MIAMI - Jurors adjourned Saturday evening without reaching a verdict in the federal corruption trial of seven Miami police officers whose charges include racketeering, drug trafficking and murder conspiracy. U.S. District Judge Kenneth L. Ryskamp told the 11 jurors to return to the courthouse to resume deliberations at 9 a.m. EST Monday.

Martin L. King honored

CAMBRIDGE, Md. - Many of the same people in a struggle for civil rights in 1963 marched again Saturday here to hold a prayer vigil on the county courthouse steps. The group of about 60 blacks, linking arms and singing freedom songs, was led by Gloria Richardson Dandridge, who led marches almost daily in 1963 in then-racially torn Cambridge. Dandridge was the keynote speaker for a rally at Bethel AME Church that was an early celebration of the Jan. 15 birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

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NEWS

TOBACCO HEIR URGES SMOKERS TO SUE

By Arlene Levinson, The Associated Press
282 words
11 January 1987
The Record, Northern New Jersey
All Editions.=.Final. South Bergen. Northwest Bergen.; Northern Valley/Pascack Valley. East/Central. Passaic-Morris
a22

Anyone suffering ill health from smoking should call their lawyer and sue the tobacco manufacturer, a grandson of the founder of one of America's largest tobacco companies said yesterday.

When lawyers and doctors "share the belief that, by working together to hold the tobacco industry legally responsible for the death and disease which it causes," Patrick Reynolds told lawyers at a national conference on tobacco suits, "the (anti-smoking) fight might actually be won.

The 37-year-old actor and former smoker who lives in Beverly Hills, Calif., is a grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.

About 55 people, mostly lawyers and a sprinkling of physicians, attended the three-day forum at the Northeastern University Law School that was sponsored by the school's Tobacco Products Liability Project.

About 140 liability cases are pending against the tobacco industry. To date, no plaintiffs have won, but Reynolds believes victory is coming soon.

He predicted successful suits will drive up the cost of tobacco products, making them too expensive to tempt teen-agers and that news reports about hapless smoking victims filing the suits will impress the public.

In an interview after his speech, Reynolds said he believes his grandfather, who didn't smoke, would have endorsed his antitobacco activism.

"It's the right thing to do," he said.

"When my grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, began manufacturing cigarettes, he didn't know they cause cancer, heart disease, and lung disease. Now that we know this, it's important to me as his grandson to do everything in my power against the continued manufacture of cigarettes."

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NEWS
AROUND THE U.S.

AROUND THE U.S.

From Wire Reports
190 words
11 January 1987
The Dallas Morning News
2 STAR
17a

Tobacco heir urges smokers to sue

BOSTON -- Anyone suffering ill health from smoking should call a lawyer and sue the tobacco manufacturer, a grandson of the founder of one of America's largest tobacco companies said Saturday. When lawyers and doctors "share the belief that, by working together to hold the tobacco industry legally responsible for the death and disease which it causes, the (anti-smoking) fight might actually be won,' Patrick Reynolds told lawyers.

Kennedy outlines panel's agenda

WASHINGTON -- Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, new chairman of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, said Saturday that the panel's agenda would include improved education and health care, full employment and equal opportunity for all Americans. In a statement prepared for the start of his committee's hearings on Monday, Kennedy outlined the issues he expects the panel to explore during the 100th Congress. Kennedy, D-Mass., said the committee will hold hearings on health on Monday, employment on Tuesday, education on Wednesday and equal opportunity on Jan. 22.

Photo: Edward M. Kennedy. ; LOCATION: Kennedy, Edward M.

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NEWS

Tobacco heir warns of smoking danger

Lewis Cope; Staff Writer
496 words
13 March 1987
Star-Tribune Newspaper of the Twin Cities Mpls.-St. Paul
METRO
05B

Patrick Reynolds, an heir to the Reynolds tobacco fortunes, said Thursday night that he's proud to be biting the hand that fed him.

"That same hand has killed millions of people, and may kill millions more unless people wake up to the hazards of cigarettes," he told 265 people at a meeting of Minnesota's Smoke Free 2000 Coalition in St. Paul.

Reynolds, 32, who last year began going public with a crusade against the tobacco industry also:

# Urged anyone dying of a smoking-related illness to "sue the tobacco companies." He expressed hope that successful lawsuits will force cigarette makers to raise the price to $3 or $4 a pack, and that will discourage smoking.

# Urged Congress to ban cigarette advertising, which he called "the single greatest lie ever perpetuated on the American public."

He said the use of sports, romance, youth and success in cigarette advertising misleads the public about what he called a dirty and unhealthy addiction.

"To allow any continued advertising,when cigarettes have killed millions, is immoral," he said.

Reynolds, a boyish looking 6 feet 1, has been a movie star and is the son of a heavy smoker who died of smoking-related disease.

The $2.5 million he inherited at age 21 came from the estate left by his grandfather R.J. Reynolds, founder of the giant R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. The grandfather didn't smoke cigarettes. Patrick Reynolds has since sold all of his Reynolds stock.

His father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., died in 1964 of emphysema, a lung disease usually caused by smoking. "It hurt me terribly watching my father slowly die," Patrick Reynolds said. "He was always short of breath and counting the days he had to live. . . . But that wasn't even enough to get me to be an activist."

Patrick Reynolds had become hooked on cigarettes as a teen-ager. He then spent 10 years trying to kick his nicotine addiction. By the time he was successful three years ago, he had development a strong dislike of the cigarette industry.

By chance, he met Sen. Robert Packwood, R-Ore., who asked him to testify at a congressional hearing in support of a proposed ban on cigarette advertising. Reynolds made such a star witness that he took on the cause nationally last year, becoming a traveling spokesman for the American Lung Association's antismoking campaign.

Before that he had followed in his mother's footsteps, becoming a minor movie star. He made appearances in the films "Nashville" and "Airplane!" and had a starring role in the low-budget film "Eliminators." His mother, Marianne, was a Warner Brothers starlet before marrying Patrick's father.

The Smoke Free 2000 Coalition is a statewide organization composed of the American Lung Association and various other groups that are seeking to get as many people as possible to stop smoking by the turn of the century.

PHOTO

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NEWS

Rancho Mirage waters down tough no-smoking proposal // Business owners still fuming

:Associated Press
508 words
8 May 1987
The Orange County Register
EVENING
A03

Copyright (c) 1987 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

In a spirit of compromise, the City Council revised its tough proposal to ban smoking in most public places after an intense five-hour meeting, but some business owners still were not pleased with the outcome.

By a 4-1 vote Thursday night, the council adopted a number of amendments that would allow restaurants to set aside one-third of dining areas for smokers, providing the businesses meet requirements including a charcoal-filtered ventiliation system.

Because of changes made in the proposed ordinance, the council must vote again on the compromise measure. It scheduled the issue for its May 21 meeting.

In offices and other businesses, the council would allow smoking as long as employers establish a small separate lounge, which must be physically sealed off from non-smoking areas and be equipped with a charcoal-filtered ventilation system.

The original proposal called for banning smoking in most public places and in all work areas in this desert resort where Frank Sinatra and former President Gerald Ford have homes.

Dominick Zangari, president of the Rancho Mirage Restaurant and Merchants Association, said today he still wants to fight the ordinance, despite the revisions.

"I don't think it's a fair compromise," Zangari said.

About 500 people attended the meeting, which set proponents, who are concerned with public health, against opponents, who are alarmed by the potential impact the ordinance might have on the local economy.

Proponents said non-smoking restaurants would draw business to the Coachella Valley city near Palm Springs. But opponents predicted massive business losses.

The California Association of Tobacco & Candy Distributors canceled reservations last month for its 1988 winter conference at the Mission Hills Resort Hotel, said hotel general manager Bill Marzonie.

And sponsors of the Nabisco Dinah Shore Golf Tournament, which brings 80,000 people to the city and generates up to $13 million, have threatened to pull out.

The tournament sponsor, RJR Nabisco Inc., is the parent company of the nation's largest cigarette maker, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. The Nabisco Dinah Shore tournament has been held at Mission Hills Country Club for 16 years.

Anti-smoking activists said the tournament's threat amounted to corporate blackmail.

"They are trying to extort a vote from our City Council," said Burt Kaplan, leader of a grass-roots coalition representing physicians, the American Lung Association, American Cancer Society and concerned residents.

Before the council debated and voted on the ordinance, it heard about four hours of public comment.

Zangari predicted that if the ordinance was approved, local restaurants and businesses would suffer a high mortality rate and thousands of visitors and employees would suffer.

But that view was countered by Patrick Reynolds of Beverly Hills, the grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., an ardent opponent of smoking.

"I firmly believe the ordinance would be a boon to the city," Reynolds said. "Pass the ordinance, and be remembered as wise, caring and far-sighted."

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TV BOOK

OFF CAMERA

Carol Burton Terry
835 words
28 June 1987
Newsday
ALL EDITIONS
66

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1987)

NOW WATCH HIS SMOKE. Reynolds tobacco-fortune heir Patrick Reynolds has gone Hollywood, pursuing an acting career. The first starring role to waft his way is in a sci-fi film called "Eliminator," which he talks about on an upcoming "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous." He also admits - surprise, surprise - "it's fun being rich!" RIGHT-HAND MAN. When Chief of Staff Howard Baker does his job, no one is laughing. But when Conrad Bain runs the White House for George C. Scott, it's amusement time on "Mr. President" (WNYW/5, Sundays at 9 p.m.). "They're selling it as a comedy drama. I'm not sure what that means," says Bain, with acerbic humor born of a nomadic Canadian childhood. It's unclear who the show's straight man is ("We're still sorting that out"), and with so many directions in which to go ("It depends on how many presidents you research"), each segment is a surprise. And usually well-written. "That's one of the things that attracted me," he says.

"I thought it was more literate, with better writing, better than monosyllabic responses." Bain, you will recall, was Arthur Harman, the next-door neighbor on "Maude." He was hand-picked for the role by Norman Lear, who lifted him from the Broadway play "Twigs." Theater had been Bain's life until then ("I was very much a purist . . . reality changed my mind"), and he went on to eight years as Phillip Drummond on "Diff'rent Strokes." But he'd been on TV in its early days, the days of "Studio One" and its ilk. "In TV theater, you were working for a camera. There was no audience. It was all done in a big studio in Grand Central Station. The sets were set up around the walls of a large room. Big, heavy cameras moved from set to set. They didn't have the technology then. It was hairraising." For many years, he worked in theater by night, soaps by day ("It made my life more civilized"). But he didn't like working the soaps because "it provokes artificial work . . . The long pauses on soaps are for remembering lines." Bain now lives in California and on Shelter Island ("Seventeen feet above the water in a house that looks like its going to blow off the cliff"). His three children are grown, and while his wife, Monica, pursues her art (commissioned paintings and putting a show together for fall), Bain goes fishing in a Boston Whaler ("a modest boat"), plays classical guitar ("for my own pleasure"), composes music ("One ballad is good for the theme of a romantic film; I did a demo"), or does some writing ("It's of no consequence, the outlines for possible television series that I'm trying to refine"). On any given day, he spends hours on business matters ("I do all my own investing"), runs for a couple of hours on a fire trail in Santa Monica and does jobs around the house ("I might try to avoid that"). He doesn't consider himself multi-talented. Just "multi-active." Your typical right-hand man. MORE RATINGS. There's a new Nielsen kid on the block. On July 11, when Fox Broadcasting introduces its new Saturday-night lineup, bringing its total of weekly programing to 10 hours, it will be included in the Nielsen ratings reports. Fox has signed up for five years with Nielsen Television Index service.

HOME AGAIN. Fans worrying over the fate of Emma Samms and John James now that "The Colbys" has gone bye-bye can relax. They're returning to the mother series, "Dynasty," continuing as Jeff Colby and Fallon Carrington Colby. Samms, who had come out of "General Hospital" to test out prime time in the Fallon character, will not be returning to the soap as originally anticipated.

STARGAZING. Look for British actor Michael York to turn up as an old flame of Abby Ewing (Donna Mills) on "Knots Landing" . . . Valerie Harper will play a public-relations executive who decides to become a housewife - to the dismay of her famiy - in the CBS film "Drop-Out Mother." Wayne Rogers, Carol Kane and Kim Hunter costar . . . Charlton Heston plays a cattle rancher, Peter Strauss his estranged son in ABC's "The Tall Men." . . . Don Johnson will do an anti-drug show for NBC this fall, using action, animation and rock music. And Harry Belafonte is lined up for an inspirational story on NBC on the 20th anniversary of Martin Luther King's death . . . The gang at Cheers won't have barmaid Shelley Long to bring them culture anymore. But Kirstie Alley will take over this fall as manager of Sam Malone's (Ted Danson) Boston tavern after he sells to a large corporation. Alley will, no doubt, add a note of excitement, but there's no word yet on the aspects of her character.

PHOTO-Conrad Bain, the president's main man

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TV BOOK

OFF CAMERA

Carol Burton Terry
835 words
28 June 1987
Newsday
ALL EDITIONS
66

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1987)

NOW WATCH HIS SMOKE. Reynolds tobacco-fortune heir Patrick Reynolds has gone Hollywood, pursuing an acting career. The first starring role to waft his way is in a sci-fi film called "Eliminator," which he talks about on an upcoming "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous." He also admits - surprise, surprise - "it's fun being rich!" RIGHT-HAND MAN. When Chief of Staff Howard Baker does his job, no one is laughing. But when Conrad Bain runs the White House for George C. Scott, it's amusement time on "Mr. President" (WNYW/5, Sundays at 9 p.m.). "They're selling it as a comedy drama. I'm not sure what that means," says Bain, with acerbic humor born of a nomadic Canadian childhood. It's unclear who the show's straight man is ("We're still sorting that out"), and with so many directions in which to go ("It depends on how many presidents you research"), each segment is a surprise. And usually well-written. "That's one of the things that attracted me," he says.

"I thought it was more literate, with better writing, better than monosyllabic responses." Bain, you will recall, was Arthur Harman, the next-door neighbor on "Maude." He was hand-picked for the role by Norman Lear, who lifted him from the Broadway play "Twigs." Theater had been Bain's life until then ("I was very much a purist . . . reality changed my mind"), and he went on to eight years as Phillip Drummond on "Diff'rent Strokes." But he'd been on TV in its early days, the days of "Studio One" and its ilk. "In TV theater, you were working for a camera. There was no audience. It was all done in a big studio in Grand Central Station. The sets were set up around the walls of a large room. Big, heavy cameras moved from set to set. They didn't have the technology then. It was hairraising." For many years, he worked in theater by night, soaps by day ("It made my life more civilized"). But he didn't like working the soaps because "it provokes artificial work . . . The long pauses on soaps are for remembering lines." Bain now lives in California and on Shelter Island ("Seventeen feet above the water in a house that looks like its going to blow off the cliff"). His three children are grown, and while his wife, Monica, pursues her art (commissioned paintings and putting a show together for fall), Bain goes fishing in a Boston Whaler ("a modest boat"), plays classical guitar ("for my own pleasure"), composes music ("One ballad is good for the theme of a romantic film; I did a demo"), or does some writing ("It's of no consequence, the outlines for possible television series that I'm trying to refine"). On any given day, he spends hours on business matters ("I do all my own investing"), runs for a couple of hours on a fire trail in Santa Monica and does jobs around the house ("I might try to avoid that"). He doesn't consider himself multi-talented. Just "multi-active." Your typical right-hand man. MORE RATINGS. There's a new Nielsen kid on the block. On July 11, when Fox Broadcasting introduces its new Saturday-night lineup, bringing its total of weekly programing to 10 hours, it will be included in the Nielsen ratings reports. Fox has signed up for five years with Nielsen Television Index service.

HOME AGAIN. Fans worrying over the fate of Emma Samms and John James now that "The Colbys" has gone bye-bye can relax. They're returning to the mother series, "Dynasty," continuing as Jeff Colby and Fallon Carrington Colby. Samms, who had come out of "General Hospital" to test out prime time in the Fallon character, will not be returning to the soap as originally anticipated.

STARGAZING. Look for British actor Michael York to turn up as an old flame of Abby Ewing (Donna Mills) on "Knots Landing" . . . Valerie Harper will play a public-relations executive who decides to become a housewife - to the dismay of her famiy - in the CBS film "Drop-Out Mother." Wayne Rogers, Carol Kane and Kim Hunter costar . . . Charlton Heston plays a cattle rancher, Peter Strauss his estranged son in ABC's "The Tall Men." . . . Don Johnson will do an anti-drug show for NBC this fall, using action, animation and rock music. And Harry Belafonte is lined up for an inspirational story on NBC on the 20th anniversary of Martin Luther King's death . . . The gang at Cheers won't have barmaid Shelley Long to bring them culture anymore. But Kirstie Alley will take over this fall as manager of Sam Malone's (Ted Danson) Boston tavern after he sells to a large corporation. Alley will, no doubt, add a note of excitement, but there's no word yet on the aspects of her character.

PHOTO-Conrad Bain, the president's main man

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NEWS

ADMINISTRATION BUTTS OUT OF MOVE TO BAN SMOKING

SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE
172 words
8 October 1987
The Seattle Times
THIRD
A4

WASHINGTON _ The Reagan administration yesterday said it opposes legislation to ban smoking on domestic airline flights and will leave such matters up to airline companies to decide.

Assistant Transportation Secretary Matthew Scocozza said the administration opposes any legislation on the issue until studies are completed on the impact of such a move.

But nonsmoking activists, including Patrick Reynolds, grandson of late tobacco baron R.J. Reynolds, told a House Public Works subcommittee they can't wait for the government to conduct another study.

They asked Congress to pass a blanket ban on smoking on all domestic flights right now.

But Scocozza said, ``There are no prohibitions against U.S. carriers placing restrictions on passenger smoking on their own. . . .''

The House already has adopted legislation to ban smoking on all flights of less than two hours duration, and the Senate Appropriations Committee last week voted 17-12 to include the legislation in the Transportation Department's spending package.

Caption: SMP

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NATIONAL

Tobacco heir says `don't smoke'

United Press International
400 words
11 November 1987
St. Petersburg Times
CITY
26A

INDIANAPOLIS - The grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. has a message for smokers and those who are thinking about taking up the habit.

The message is ``don't smoke.``

Patrick J. Reynolds is taking his anti-smoking campaign across the country and is preparing a stop-smoking campaign that will bear his family's name. The 38-year-old former smoker, who was in Indianapolis to speak at an Indiana State Medical Association Convention, said he has not smoked in three years and is not worried about being viewed as a traitor.

``I like to think my grandfather is in heaven, not concerned with making a profit anymore and saying, `Grandson Patrick, you're doing the right thing,``' Reynolds said last weekend.

Reynolds said his grandfather, a non-smoker, did not know smoking could cause disease and death, but he remembers his father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., as a heavy smoker. Reynolds Jr. died of emphysema at age 58.

``(He was) always short of breath, increasingly sick and counting the time he had left to live,`` Reynolds said.

Patrick Reynolds kicked the habit in 1984, five years after he sold all his stock in the North Carolina-based tobacco giant now known as RJR Nabisco Inc.

``I smoked for 10 years and it was a terrible struggle to stop,`` he said. ``I was 15 when I had my first cigarette and I wanted to look older. I wasn't one of those who said `I quit!' and never took another one again. Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin, and 80 percent of the people who stop smoking go back.``

Reynolds said there are 50,000 scientific studies linking cigarette smoking to heart disease, lung disease and cancer. He said only 26 percent of Americans now smoke, but cigarettes kill about 1,000 people a day.

``Cigarettes are the most heavily promoted product in America, with $2-billion being spent each year to sell a product that generates $60-billion a year,`` he said. ``Tobacco companies argue the First Amendment protects their right to advertise cigarettes, but I think the ads should be banned.``

Reynolds has testified before Congress in support of a smoking ban on airplanes and a total ban on cigarette advertising, which has been limited to newspapers, magazines and billboards in recent years.

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Where There's Smoke There's Fire

By Susan L. Wampler
2,176 words
21 December 1987
Indianapolis Business Journal
Pg. 15
v8, n35, Section 1

Copyright Business Press Inc 1987

Indianapolis, IN, US --

Whose rights prevail when there is a confrontation between smokers and nonsmokers in the workplace? Are smokers who are addicted to nicotine "handicapped" and therefore deserving of special consideration? Is the adoption of a nonsmoker-only hiring policy a form of racial discrimination?

Amid a steadily increasing percentage of nonsmokers and a corresponding increase in intolerance to smoking in public, there are no easy answers to such questions.

Gone are the days when smoking was merely a nuisance to nonsmokers. Employers now are drawing fire for not providing a safe workplace for their non-smoking employees, who, according to a 1983 Gallup organization poll, account for 71 percent of the country's population.

Adding fuel to the fire was the surgeon general's report on the hazards to non-smokers of secondary smoke. As a result, how to deal with smoking in the workplace, once a non-issue, is now one of the hottest questions facing employers.

And the fire seems destined to get hotter.

Wayne O. "Skip" Adams, partner and head of the Labor and Employee Benefits Practice Group at Bingham Summers Welsh & Spilman, says the topic will become even more controversial before it is resolved. He also expects the issue to be raised with increasing frequency in the labor and employment law field.

Says Adams, "In a workforce of smokers and nonsmokers alike, they are almost destined to have problems with morale and in getting along with each other. Although there are many different battlefields for this dispute, the workplace [stands out] because [people] spend most of their waking hours at work."

But Adams is quick to add that despite the diversity and intensity of opinion on the topic, dissension among employees is not the necessary consequence. There are a number of options employers may take to prevent problems. He and Bingham Summers associate David J. Carr presented those options, along with the legal ramifications of the issue, at a seminar on "Smoking in the Workplace" in late November.

"As lawyers, we don't advocate the cause of smokers or nonsmokers. We represent the employer," explains Adams. "It's the employer that gets caught in the middle."

And while the attorneys don't take sides on the issue, Adams adds that "the one thing we do advocate is that they [employers] have a policy." He says that though many employers ignore the issue, "No action is not the most prudent course of action."

Public officials no longer have the option of "no action," with the Indiana General Assembly's enactment of the Indiana Clean Indoor Air Law, effective Sept. 1, 1987. The law requires the designation of nonsmoking areas in public buildings and permits the designation of smoking areas. The State Board of Health is charged with enforcing the new law.

According to John D. MacDougall M.D., president of the Indiana State Medical Association, the law includes hospitals and health facilities in its definition of public buildings. Adams adds that private buildings which house government agencies may be required to comply with the law, at least in areas where state offices are located. However, he notes that there are no court decisions as yet to shed light on the matter.

Carr adds that no cases have been reported on the smoking issue in general in Indiana and that there have been "only a dozen cases in the entire country" on the subject.

Some of those cases, however, provide some pretty interesting reading material.

Take for example the case of Gasper v. Louisiana Stadium and Exposition District, where the plaintiffs argued that the failure to provide a smoke-free environment at the Superdome interfered with the right to free speech. Carr explains that such constitutional claims have been universally rejected. "There is no constitutional right to smoke and no constitutional right to breathe clean air."

Another interesting theory is raised in the arena of discrimination.

Both nonsmokers and smokers have claimed to be handicapped and have sought relief against discrimination because of such handicaps. For example, a smoker may claim she is handicapped because she is addicted to nicotine. On the other hand, a nonsmoker may claim his allergy to tobacco smoke makes him handicapped.

But Carr adds that, "One who just doesn't like cigarette smoke is not [considered to be handicapped]" and that "there are no reported cases in which smokers have been declared to be handicapped persons because of an addiction to nicotine." He also stresses that Indiana's definition of "handicap" is much narrower than that of most states, making it more difficult here to prove such a handicap.

In addition to the handicap discrimination claims, racial discrimination can become an issue because of the disparity in the number of black and white men who smoke. Says Adams, quoting a 1985 surgeon general report using 1980 statistics, 47.7 percent of black men smoke while only 40 percent of white men smoke. Thus a policy against hiring smokers could have an adverse impact on black employees.

However, Adams adds, a strong case can be made for the business necessity of implementing such a policy, such as the fact that smokers tend to be sick more often and are less productive. But he cautions that an otherwise non-discriminatory policy which is not even-handedly implemented, can become discriminatory.

Constitutional and discrimination cases aside, Carr says a more commonly used strategy is filing an injunction suit. He explains that although all states (with the exception of Louisiana which does not recognize common law) have found that an employer has a common- law duty to provide a safe workplace, nonsmokers' suits for court injunctions to ban or restrict on-the-job smoking have met with mixed results. The theory behind the cases is that a "safe environment means a `smoke-free' environment," says Carr.

A 1976 New Jersey court issued an injunction ordering an employer to establish an on-the-job smoking ban, limiting smoking to non-work areas, on behalf of an employee who was allergic to smoke. Carr says, "The case [Shimp v. New Jersey Bell Telephone Co.] is unique because the court found a cause of action" permitting the nonsmoker to bring suit for injunctive relief."

A more recent decision would permit the award of monetary damages. In McCarthy v. Social and Health Services, a Washington state case, an employee developed pulmonary disease and sued the department for failure "to provide her with an environment reasonably free of tobacco smoke." Carr says the case is unusual because the employee's claim was not preempted by worker's compensation. The case, now on appeal to the Washington Supreme Court, is being watched very closely, adds Carr.

Other theories which have been used to pursue action on a smoking issue include:

* Breach of implied contract to maintain a smoke-free environment

* Wrongful termination lawsuits

* OSHA regulations

(Under the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act and Indiana's corresponding law, "employers have a general duty to establish and maintain [reasonably safe and healthful] conditions of employment," says Carr. But because an employee cannot bring a private right of action against an employer under these laws -- only the Department of Labor can do so -- OSHA regulations do not come into play very much in smoking cases, says Carr.)

* Workmen's compensation and disability claims

* Unemployment compensation claims

(One issue here is whether a non-smoking employee is entitled to compensation after voluntary or involuntary termination because the employee is unable or unwilling to work in the presence of smoke.)

In light of the above outlined legal ramifications, the dilemma of establishing and enforcing a legally acceptable, employee- tolerable smoking policy is often a challenging task for an employer.

Adams says he makes a general recommendation to employers to "try to not treat smokers as lepers." He adds that employers should "involve all groups of employees, including management and non- management, smokers and nonsmokers. Smoking policies should be enforced fairly, consistently and firmly," and "the policy should be applied to all employees, management and non-management alike."

Adams also advocates educational efforts and a phased-in approach. "If you intend to ban, don't do it cold turkey. That's inhuman, and destined to fail in terms of its effect on smoking employees."

At one end of the spectrum, Adams cites the success story of Lincoln National Life Insurance Co. "By the time they reached the target, most of their smokers had quit," he said.

According to Adams, another problem with a complete ban is that "you may single out good employees who can't or don't want to quit. You may cut off your nose to spite your face," says Adams, who favors a more moderate policy.

One employer which arguably could have benefited from such advice is an Elkhart company that instituted a ban on smoking in and out of the workplace, even though the smoking might have taken place at home or on the weekends. Says Adams, the company was going to enforce the ban by periodically giving pulmonary exams and dismissing those who were found to have been smoking.

"When you go as far as this company did, you're asking for an invasion of privacy suit," says Adams. "Even if no one ever files a lawsuit, it is offensive to many employees to think the employer is getting into their lives outside company time. Good judgment must be used."

Yet another consideration is the special problems which arise for unionized employers. Implementation of a smoking ban or restriction without bargaining with the union may be a violation of a collective bargaining agreement, depending on the breadth of the employer's management powers clause. Also, for the non-unionized employer, institution of a ban might lead to unionization, says Carr.

But Adams suggests that as the number of nonsmokers continues to increase, unions may feel pressure to advocate non-smoking policies and pursue litigation "claiming the employer has not established or maintained a safe employment area."

An employer also may set himself up for litigation by referring to "rights" in the smoking policy. Adams says that "per se, [neither smokers nor nonsmokers] have any legal rights. By mentioning 'rights,' you may tacitly be creating them," he cautions.

Other alternative smoking policies include such strategies as improved ventilation, smoke filters, air purifiers and overall office configuration. Brad Bowden, director of design and space planning for Indianapolis Office Supply, addressed such alternatives as part of the November seminar on "Smoking in the Workplace," in conjunction with Adams and Carr.

"We have a few ways of dealing with [smoking] through creative design," says Bowden. "If the policy is `no smoking,' we're done. If smoking is to be confined to limited areas, we [usually create] smoking lounges or break rooms on the perimeter of the building so the smoke can be ventilated directly outside. Confining smoking to the restrooms doesn't solve the problem," says Bowden, "because everyone uses the restrooms."

Echoing Adams, Bowden says "We want to avoid making smokers [feel like] second-class citizens." He stresses the importance of communication and says that a good design firm, in the interview process, will address the concerns of smokers and nonsmokers alike. "You have to be diplomatic. You learn not to offend, but to get good information from them. We may find problems the managers don't know about," adds Bowden.

"Designers deal with the emotional aspects of change. [Employees'] workspace is near and dear to them," says Bowden.

As for a subject near and dear to the tobacco industry, Adams, Carr and Bowden agree that the industry has yet to make a full- fledged counter-attack against the national trend favoring non- smoking. Says Carr, "It is yet to be seen how successful smokers claims will be."

Adams notes that the tobacco industry has been supportive of the establishment of smoking policies in the workplace, though the industry tends to oppose out-and-out bans as "inherently offensive." He says the industry's representatives tend to "focus on workplace air quality and ventilation systems" and that they "direct the focus away from tobacco. The tobacco industry is persuasive and effective in articulating their position."

One heir to a tobacco empire, however, has spoken out vocally and vehemently against smoking.

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R. J. Reynolds (who founded the nation's second largest domestic cigarette producer), has divested all of his interest in the tobacco company and has become an outspoken, anti-smoking activist. Reynolds addressed the annual meeting of the Indiana State Medical Association, held at Indianapolis' Radisson Plaza in November, discussing his withdrawal from R.J. Reynolds Industries Inc., now RJR Nabisco, and the cancer which caused his grandfather's death.

Reynolds position evidences at least partial dissension among traditional advocates of tobacco use and proves once again that there are no easy answers or clear-cut lines on this smoldering question. Only time will tell who will emerge from the ashes.

Illustration: photograph

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NEWS
MICHAEL SNEED

MICHAEL SNEED

Michael Sneed
804 words
19 January 1988
Chicago Sun-Times
FIVE STAR SPORTS FINAL
2

Hmmmm . . .

Omipapa! Isn't one of the big reasons Ald. Pat O'Connor bleats so loudly over Republican fliers blasting him for voting for a property tax increase because a member of his immediate family has a top job with the City Council Finance Committee? The boss: Ald. Tim Evans, finance chairman, who backed the tax plan! Why does everything seem so clear now?

Double hmmmm . . .

The big question: Rumors are rampant in La La Land that a young actor who hasn't been seen for a while is in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center being treated for an AIDS-related condition. It's a shocker.

The dresser . . .

Agreed: Mayor Sawyer is a savvy fellow. Agreed: Mayor Sawyer is adept at getting legislation passed. Agreed: Mayor Sawyer is a classy dresser. Advice: Take off the pinky ring, gold bracelet and flashy watch. John Molloy, author of The New Dress for Success, claims Sawyer's jewelry gives the impression of being a "sharpie" and a "crapshooter." Then there's the question of dapper Ald. Ed Burke.

A France file . . .

Word is Mayor Sawyer wants to keep special counsel Erwin France at his side a whole lot longer than his recent 60-day extension. France, Sawyer's skilled $120-an-hour adviser, is at Sawyer's side constantly at City Hall. The only other person who meets alone with hizzoner: chief operating officer Sharon Gist Gilliam, who is so smart that even this columnist is in awe.

Dem da Dem Dem . . . The Biden beat: Pssst! In case you were wondering what exchange took place in London recently between former Dem presidential contender Joe "Cheatem" Biden and Brit pol Neil Kinnock, the man whose speech Biden plagiarized, here's a tip: Biden gave Kinnock a bound copy of all Biden's speeches!

See Jesse run: Word is Dem presidential contender Jesse Jackson sent word to all ward and township committeemen saying that because he is supporting the entire Dem slate he should be allowed to speak at all meetings!

GOP goop . . .

Knives anyone? Cook County Sheriff Jim O'Grady and Eddie Vrdolyak, who are possible leading contenders for the GOP mayoral nomination, are on the roster to attend the retreat sponsored by "new Republicans" at the Curacao Caribbean Hotel Casino March 18-22. Will Cook County GOP Chairman Don Totten's demise be on the agenda?

The Oprah file . . .

To chase away those winter blues, Oprah Winfrey told Family Circle magazine: "I put on my purple flannel nightgown and my rabbit ear slippers, boil some hot cinnamon tea, open the window a crack so I can hear the wind, and snuggle up to a good book . . . or with my boyfriend, Stedman. It delights my senses." Mine, too, Oprah.

Brit bits . . .

The creme de la scum of British journalism reports a psychic plans to publish a book of recipes transmitted from the beyond by food critic James Beard, who died three years ago. (Be still my acid tongue.) . . . This just in: Actor Michael Caine, who fled L.A. for the countryside, feels his country has a higher quality of life. In America, success is two cars, two TVs, two refrigerators and a psychiatrist. In London, it's one of everything and . . . no psychiatrist. Get the couch!

A sneak peek . . .

Dateline: The Pump Room. Time: Friday night. Location: Booth One. The diners: Patrick Reynolds (son of tobacco heir R. J. Reynolds) and one of the world's richest men, Adnan Khashoggi. The script: After dinner, Patrick signed the Pump Room guest book as follows: "For those of you who still SMOKE, we can get you interested in stopping at the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program based right here in Chicago. Call us when you are ready! Patrick `Anti-Camel' Reynolds." Huh? Sneedlings . . .

Actress Lana Turner's daughter, Cheryl Crane, visits WGN's Wally Phillips' lunchtime show at Ditka's today. Stay tuned for a shocker. . . . Cafe society singer Julie Wilson, who wears a gardenia behind her ear a la Billie Holiday, will be at the Gold Star Sardine Bar Jan. 25-29. Wilson snagged a lead role in Peter Allen's new Broadway musical, "Legs Diamond." . . . And in this corner: The legendary Ben Bentley will be ringside Friday at Jimmy Rittenberg's Faces nightclub calling the televised Larry Holmes/Mike Tyson fight. . . . Great news that basketball great Chris Mullin was just released from a 30-day stint in an alcohol-abuse clinic - for a problem a little stronger than reported. . . . Today's birthdays: Desi Arnaz Jr., 35; Phil Everly, 50; Jean Stapleton, 65; Dolly Parton, 42; WGN's Roy Leonard, 57. . . . Next up for actor Burt Reynolds, whose "Rent a Cop" went bombsville: He'll do the voice of a dog in the animated film "Charlie's Friends." Is that typecasting? Nawwww.

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NEWS

Briefly

82 words
28 January 1988
USA Today
FINAL
02A

Leah Tutu, wife of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Desmond Tutu, threw handfuls of mud at tourists who took pictures outside her home in the South African ghetto of Soweto. ... Matilda Cuomo joins entertainer Harry Belafonte on UNICEF-sponsored trip to African nation of Zimbabwe in February, said her husband, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who has cut back his travel. ... Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco tycoon R.J. Reynolds, says he supports South Carolina bill restricting smoking in public places.

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NEWS

Panel OKs smoking curb in restaurants

Ray Hanania
553 words
1 March 1988
Chicago Sun-Times
FIVE STAR SPORTS FINAL
1

Most restaurants would be required to designate half their space as nonsmoking areas under a proposed ordinance unanimously endorsed Monday by the City Council Health Committee.

Sponsored by Ald. Raymond A. Figueroa (31st), the proposal would require restaurants with 40 or more seats to designate half of their space for nonsmokers.

If approved by the Council, the ordinance also would require hospitals to restrict smokers to limited smoking areas.

The ordinance proposes fines of $100 to $200 for offenders.

It was immediately criticized as too restrictive by the Illinois Restaurant Association.

But Ald. Allan Streeter (17th), Health Committee chairman, said committee members, voting to recommend the proposed law to the next Council meeting March 9, also said they favored broadening the law to include most businesses.

Streeter said a new draft of the ordinance is being reviewed by city attorneys. It will include provisions to include businesses with 40 or more employees, while exempting sports arenas, taverns and convention centers.

"We need an ordinance like this because secondhand smoke is as much a hazard to health as is primary smoke," Streeter said. "People who don't smoke but who inhale secondhand smoke are as susceptible to cancer and health-related problems as are the smokers."

Figueroa said he will support the amendments, which would broaden the ordinance to include most public areas in the city.

"I think that it is time we passed an ordinance of this nature to protect citizens who do not smoke, while permitting those who wish to smoke to do so," Figueroa said.

Streeter and Figueroa predicted passage of the ordinance, although it may face opposition from aldermen whose wards have many restaurants.

The ordinance also was endorsed by Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R. J. Reynolds, founder of one of the nation's largest tobacco producers.

In testimony before the Health Committee, Reynolds said the ordinance is "fair and probably does not really go far enough to restrict smoking."

"All it requires is that an area be designated," said Reynolds, 39, chairman of the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program in Chicago.

"It will not require the businesses or restaurants to install any partitions, so there is no major expense, only the requirement of setting aside this convenience for nonsmokers."

Reynolds said he began a crusade against cigarette smoking despite his family's historic involvement in the cigarette and tobacco industry.

"My father died when I was 15 of emphysema, and that was a major factor in my decision to commit myself to fighting smoking," Reynolds said.

Andy Kelly, president of the Illinois Restaurant Association, said his association favors "looser" guidelines for nonsmoking areas and opposes Figueroa's proposal. "We are already on record favoring no-smoking sections in restaurants," Kelly said.

"But we want the restaurant owners to be able to tailor the sections to their particular clientele," he said. "During the day, their clientele may be businessmen who are all smokers, but at night that may change and the clientele may be mostly nonsmokers."

An Illinois Hospital Association spokeswoman said most Chicago hospitals have assigned smoking and nonsmoking areas, and welcomed the proposed law.

"We have supported similar efforts in the past. The extra effort that it would require is far outweighed by the health benefits," said spokeswoman Jeanne Corrigan.

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NEWS

SMOKING BAN SENT TO COUNCIL

Cheryl Devall
678 words
1 March 1988
Chicago Tribune
SPORTS FINAL; C
1

Smoking in many public places would be prohibited in Chicago for the first time under an ordinance approved unanimously Monday by a Chicago City Council committee.

The "indoor clean-air ordinance," introduced last June, was endorsed by the council's Health Committee after a City Hall hearing and is expected to be considered by the full council March 9.

The ordinance would require enclosed public places in the city, including government buildings, waiting rooms, restaurants and hotel lobbies, to establish nonsmoking areas.

In addition, employers would have to create nonsmoking areas in their workplaces, and smoking would be prohibited completely in taxis, public restrooms, polling places and public-meeting and assembly rooms.

Owners of restaurants with more than 40 seats would be required to designate at least half of them for nonsmokers.

The ordinance is modeled after an Illinois Clean Indoor Air Act, which failed to pass the state legislature last year. So far, 39 other states and several cities have passed laws restricting public smoking.

Unlike laws in some cities requiring walls or other barriers between smoking and nonsmoking areas, the Chicago ordinance would have business owners and building managers designate space in existing facilities. As such, the legislation does not entirely please its sponsor, Ald. Raymond Figueroa (31st).

"I'm not totally comfortable with it, but we've got to do something," he said.

"Smoking in a particular area still affects everyone else," Figueroa said. "You have a restaurant with more than 40 seats, and when somebody smokes at the other end of the room it still affects them."

Violators would be subject to fines of $100 for the first offense and $200 for subsequent offenses. The ordinance is to be further amended to include hospitals in the ban, and other amendments may be made before the ordinance is presented to the entire council, said Ald. Allan Streeter (17th), Health Committee chairman.

The Chicago Lung Association, the Chicago chapter of the American Cancer Society and other public health and consumer organizations supported the ordinance when it was introduced last summer.

But while a restaurant trade association supports the idea of separate areas for smokers and nonsmokers, its members want the discretionary power to designate how many seats will go in each.

"That should be left open to the restaurateur to fit the physical configuration and the clientele of his operation," said Andy Kelly, president of the Illinois Restaurant Association.

Kelly said association members fear they would have to turn away smoking customers to comply with the Chicago ordinance, and added that San Francisco, which has one of the toughest public-smoking bans in the country, excluded bars and restaurants from its ordinance for that reason. The restaurant association is calling on members to contact their aldermen about the ordinance, Kelly said.

On Monday, the Health Committee heard testimony from a medical resident who discussed the adverse effects of secondhand smoke and from the heir of a tobacco dynasty who has become an antismoking crusader.

"I champion this ordinance," said Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Reynolds, 39, a Chicago businessman who said he sold his stock in the family company almost 10 years ago, spends much of his time campaigning for higher cigarette taxes and for the passage of laws similar to the Chicago ordinance.

Chicago's proposal may be less stringent than those elsewhere, Reynolds said, but he called it reasonable and timely.

The strongest antismoking ordinance in the Chicago area went into effect last December in Skokie. The law limits smoking to designated areas in public places, including municipal buildings, stores, hotels and doctors' offices. Restaurants with 40 or fewer seats, bars, bowling alleys and tobacco stores are exempt. Evanston recently proposed a requirement that restaurant owners set aside 70 percent of their tables for nonsmokers.

No representatives of tobacco companies or of smokers' rights organizations attended the hearing.

Streeter said after the meeting that the only council opposition he anticipated is from aldermen whose wards contain many restaurants.

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NEWS

ANTISMOKING LAW BACKED COUNCIL COMMITTEE ENDORSES RESTRICTIONS

Cheryl Devall
537 words
1 March 1988
Chicago Tribune
NATIONAL; C
7

Smoking would be prohibited for the first time in many public places under a Chicago City Council ordinance recommended for passage Monday.

The "indoor clean air ordinance," introduced last June, was endorsed unanimously by the council's Health Committee after a City Hall hearing.

The ordinance would require enclosed public places-including restaurants with more than 40 seats, office waiting rooms and hotel lobbies-to set aside nonsmoking areas. Employees would be able to have nonsmoking areas designated in their workplaces, and smoking would be prohibited completely in taxicabs, public restrooms, polling places and public meetings and assembly rooms.

Unlike laws in some cities that require walls or other barriers between smoking and nonsmoking areas, the proposed Chicago ordinance would have business owners and building managers designate space in their facilities. As such, the legislation does not entirely please its sponsor, Ald. Raymond Figueroa (31st).

"I'm not totally comfortable with it, but we've got to do something," he said.

"Smoking in a particular area still affects everyone else," Figueroa said. "You have a restaurant with more than 40 seats, and when somebody smokes at the other end of the room it still affects them."

Violators would be subject to fines of $100 for the first offense and $200 for subsequent offenses. The ordinance is to be further amended to include hospitals in the ban, and other amendments may be made before the ordinance is presented to the entire council, said Ald. Allan Streeter (17th), Health Committee chairman.

The Chicago Lung Association, the Chicago chapter of the American Cancer Society and other public health and consumer organizations supported the ordinance when it was introduced last summer. The measure is modeled on the Illinois Clean Air Act, which failed to pass the state legislature last year, said John Kirkwood, executive director of the Chicago Lung Association.

On Monday, the Health Committee heard testimony from a medical resident who discussed the effects of secondhand smoke and from the heir of a tobacco dynasty who has become an antismoking crusader.

"I champion this ordinance," said Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Reynolds, 39, a Chicago businessman who said he sold his stock in the company almost 10 years ago, spends much of his time campaigning for higher cigarette taxes and the passage of laws similar to the Chicago ordinance.

The ordinance may be less stringent than those in 39 states and many other cities, Reynolds said, but he called it reasonable and timely.

The strongest antismoking ordinance in the Chicago area went into effect last December in Skokie. The law limits smoking to designated areas in public places, including municipal buildings, stores, hotels and doctors' offices. Restaurants with 40 or fewer seats, bars, bowling alleys and tobacco stores are exempt. Evanston recently proposed a requirement that restaurant owners set aside 70 percent of their tables for nonsmokers.

No tobacco company representatives were at the hearing.

Figueroa said he anticipates enough support in the council to pass the ordinance, which had little opposition when it was introduced.

CAPTION:

PHOTO: Ald. Raymond Figueroa expects the City Council to approve an ordinance restricting smoking.

PHOTO

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NEWS

ANTI-SMOKING CRUSADER Tobacco company heir joins fight against cigarettes

Mercedes Olivera
480 words
19 March 1988
The Dallas Morning News
HOME FINAL
37a

When Patrick Reynolds first decided two years ago that he was going to join the anti-smoking movement in America, he called his four brothers and a sister to tell them.

"They were pretty nervous about it,' said the 39-year-old heir of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. "Once they saw that the stock price wasn't affected, and that I've been positively received on the whole, they relaxed.'

Reynolds, who said he sold all his tobacco stock nine years ago, was in Dallas on Friday to promote his anti-smoking cassette program and talk about the dangers of cigarette smoking.

Once a cigarette smoker himself who tried to stop for 15 years, Reynolds said he finally gave up smoking in 1984. He became a crusader in 1986 after he was invited to speak before a congressional hearing on whether to ban cigarette advertising.

"I thought that this was an issue that if I spoke out on, people would listen,' he said.

Reynolds realized he "could be a voice to wake people up,' he said, even though his name and wealth are synonymous with American tobacco.

The incongruity has not been lost on anti-smoking forces. National lung, cancer and heart associations have recruited Reynolds as a traveling salesman of sorts -- selling the idea of a smoke-free environment.

Across the country, Reynolds has successfully promoted state and municipal clean-indoor-air legislation, higher cigarette taxes and non-smoking on airplanes. Along the way, he also has developed "The Reynolds Stop Smoking Program' to help smokers break the habit.

The kit includes two 60-minute audio cassettes, a personal development guide and one month's supply of beta carotene tablets, which Reynolds said help prevent lung cancer. He also is developing a corporate stop-smoking plan for companies that want to provide their employees with a program.

He points out that 350,000 Americans die every year because of cigarette-related diseases, and that 98 percent of all smokers started by age 20.

"I started smoking myself by the time I was 18, despite the fact that my only memories of my father are of him gasping for breath,' he said.

His father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., died in 1964 of emphysema caused by his cigarette habit, he said. His grandfather chewed tobacco and died of cancer of the pancreas in 1918.

In 1979, Reynolds said, he grew uncomfortable with all the tobacco stock he owned and sold it.

Since then, some of his brothers have divested themselves of all or half their stock, perhaps with an eye to the future, Reynolds said.

"Somewhere there's a jury that will find that the tobacco companies have not adequately warned the public about the dangers of smoking,' he said.

Photo: Patrick Reynolds ; LOCATION: Reynolds, Patrick.

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NEWS

MANHATTAN NEIGHBORHOODS MANHATTAN CLOSEUP Ads Look Good - Like Winners.

By Jessie Mangaliman
906 words
25 March 1988
Newsday
MANHATTAN
25

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

One day last fall, James Jackson came home from school and told his mother he needed to borrow a tape recorder. Something about a rap, his mother, Linda, said. Typically for a 10-year-old, he didn't elaborate, of course. But his mother complied and asked no more.

Last week, James and his friend Nigel Ricketts, 11, stood before an audience at City Hall, television cameramen and newspaper photographers watching, their parents waiting, too, for the answer. They rapped about the un-cool qualities of smoking. "Whatever you're into, smoking is out. Because it will kill you, without a doubt." Then the boys shouted in unison: "DON'T DO IT!"

That's the winning refrain of a rap song written by the fifth-graders from PS 197 in Far Rockaway, Queens, who entered it in a citywide antismoking advertisement contest.

Nigel and James split the first-prize $10,000 bond awarded by Wall Street trader Joe Cherner, who sponsored the contest. He gave out an additional $59,500 to 20 other school children from Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and Manhattan.

Cherner, who doesn't smoke, wanted this kind of peer-education campaign about the dangers of smoking. And it seems, from the results of the ad contest, which drew entries from more than 100,000 children, the lesson was well learned.

Other winning ads: "Cold Turkey Is Better Than Dead Duck," by Richard Diaz of PS 20 in Flushing, Queens; "If You Smoke . . . Why? Can't You Read?" by Heather Anderson of Midwood High School in Brooklyn, and "Smoking Is Cancer Country. Are You Dying to Go There?" by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts in Manhattan.

Hilde's DiGenearo kindergarten class from Maspeth, Queens, received $100. They gave the most beguiling performance during the award ceremonies. "Smoking is bad, bad, bad!" they screamed.

"I thought by creating an ad contest, I could get young people to look critically at cigarette ads from start to finish," Cherner said. "Instead of just accepting the message that was put forth, I wanted them to create their own message.

"I was surprised at the sheer number of ads, and I was surprised by the quality of the ideas," he added.

Cherner, who spent his own money promoting the contest, said it will be an annual event. Just as the contest was being publicized, so, too, were the hazards of smoking, through dozens of speakers who visited city schools, including U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop; actor Patrick Reynolds who is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds; Dr. Ruth Westheimer, and city Health Commissioner Stephen Joseph.

Joseph's favorite ad was a poster by Cynthia Vera of PS 63 in Manhattan. It shows Snoopy on his doghouse, with the caption: "Dream of a World Without Cigarettes."

The judges chose good messengers. Nigel's parents, Lovena Ricketts and Iman Raheem, smoke. So does James' father, James Jackson Sr.

"I'm hoping to scare them into not smoking," Nigel said. At the award ceremony March 16, Lovena Ricketts said: "He's on our case all the time. This is the last time."

Jeff Kaplan, an 18-year-old senior from Bayside High School in Queens, won $5,000 for his video of a man, holding a pack of cigarettes, pointed at passengers in a plane. "Don't Take Hostages to Your Habit."

Kaplan has been smoking for four or five years. "Since then I've been trying to quit," he said. "This ad contest is making me think a lot about smoking."

Even Mayor Edward I. Koch, who praised Cherner for his work, commented on the winning ads. "It sounds to me like we're well on our way to a smokeless generation by the year 2000." Koch was one of the judges of the contest.

In January, Koch signed the Clean Indoor Air Act, antismoking legislation supported by Cherner. Koch had lunch with Cherner last July to discuss the contest. In return, Cherner donated $100,000, splitting it between Gay Men's Health Crisis and People for a Smoke-Free Indoors.

The meal launched the ad contest.

Second-place winners were Heather Anderson, $7,500 bond, Midwood High School, Brooklyn, and Cynthia Vera, $8,000 bond, PS 63, Manhattan.

Third-place winners were Melissa Ginsberg, $5,000, South Shore High School, Brooklyn, and Jeff Kaplan, $5,000, Bayside High School, Queens.

Fourth-place winners were Lily Lin, $3,000, JHS 158, Brooklyn, and Daniel Seda, $3,000, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Brooklyn.

Fifth-prize winners, who each received $2,000 in bonds, were: Joann Acevedo, PS 131, Brooklyn; Emilio Caban, PS 54, Staten Island; Jackson Chan, JHS 168, Flushing, Queens; Charles Chapman, High School of Graphic Arts, Manhattan; Ann Marie Diaz, St. Vincent Ferrer High School, Manhattan; Richard Diaz, PS 20, Flushing, Queens; Jude Dominique, Forest Hills High School, Queens; Melissa Huebler, PS 166, Long Island City, Queens; Mark Pelligrini, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan; Michael Sande, Midwood High School, Brooklyn; Matthew Sarnoff, Hunter High School, Manhattan; David Skyler, JHS 68, Brooklyn; Huey Truong, JHS 157, Forest Hills, Queens, and Linda Tsang, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan.

Photos by Luciana Whitaker-1) Top winners James Jackson and Nigel Ricketts 2) Contest sponsor Joe Cherner holds up sign by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts

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NEWS

MANHATTAN NEIGHBORHOODS MANHATTAN CLOSEUP Ads Look Good - Like Winners.

By Jessie Mangaliman
906 words
25 March 1988
Newsday
MANHATTAN
25

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

One day last fall, James Jackson came home from school and told his mother he needed to borrow a tape recorder. Something about a rap, his mother, Linda, said. Typically for a 10-year-old, he didn't elaborate, of course. But his mother complied and asked no more.

Last week, James and his friend Nigel Ricketts, 11, stood before an audience at City Hall, television cameramen and newspaper photographers watching, their parents waiting, too, for the answer. They rapped about the un-cool qualities of smoking. "Whatever you're into, smoking is out. Because it will kill you, without a doubt." Then the boys shouted in unison: "DON'T DO IT!"

That's the winning refrain of a rap song written by the fifth-graders from PS 197 in Far Rockaway, Queens, who entered it in a citywide antismoking advertisement contest.

Nigel and James split the first-prize $10,000 bond awarded by Wall Street trader Joe Cherner, who sponsored the contest. He gave out an additional $59,500 to 20 other school children from Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and Manhattan.

Cherner, who doesn't smoke, wanted this kind of peer-education campaign about the dangers of smoking. And it seems, from the results of the ad contest, which drew entries from more than 100,000 children, the lesson was well learned.

Other winning ads: "Cold Turkey Is Better Than Dead Duck," by Richard Diaz of PS 20 in Flushing, Queens; "If You Smoke . . . Why? Can't You Read?" by Heather Anderson of Midwood High School in Brooklyn, and "Smoking Is Cancer Country. Are You Dying to Go There?" by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts in Manhattan.

Hilde's DiGenearo kindergarten class from Maspeth, Queens, received $100. They gave the most beguiling performance during the award ceremonies. "Smoking is bad, bad, bad!" they screamed.

"I thought by creating an ad contest, I could get young people to look critically at cigarette ads from start to finish," Cherner said. "Instead of just accepting the message that was put forth, I wanted them to create their own message.

"I was surprised at the sheer number of ads, and I was surprised by the quality of the ideas," he added.

Cherner, who spent his own money promoting the contest, said it will be an annual event. Just as the contest was being publicized, so, too, were the hazards of smoking, through dozens of speakers who visited city schools, including U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop; actor Patrick Reynolds who is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds; Dr. Ruth Westheimer, and city Health Commissioner Stephen Joseph.

Joseph's favorite ad was a poster by Cynthia Vera of PS 63 in Manhattan. It shows Snoopy on his doghouse, with the caption: "Dream of a World Without Cigarettes."

The judges chose good messengers. Nigel's parents, Lovena Ricketts and Iman Raheem, smoke. So does James' father, James Jackson Sr.

"I'm hoping to scare them into not smoking," Nigel said. At the award ceremony March 16, Lovena Ricketts said: "He's on our case all the time. This is the last time."

Jeff Kaplan, an 18-year-old senior from Bayside High School in Queens, won $5,000 for his video of a man, holding a pack of cigarettes, pointed at passengers in a plane. "Don't Take Hostages to Your Habit."

Kaplan has been smoking for four or five years. "Since then I've been trying to quit," he said. "This ad contest is making me think a lot about smoking."

Even Mayor Edward I. Koch, who praised Cherner for his work, commented on the winning ads. "It sounds to me like we're well on our way to a smokeless generation by the year 2000." Koch was one of the judges of the contest.

In January, Koch signed the Clean Indoor Air Act, antismoking legislation supported by Cherner. Koch had lunch with Cherner last July to discuss the contest. In return, Cherner donated $100,000, splitting it between Gay Men's Health Crisis and People for a Smoke-Free Indoors.

The meal launched the ad contest.

Second-place winners were Heather Anderson, $7,500 bond, Midwood High School, Brooklyn, and Cynthia Vera, $8,000 bond, PS 63, Manhattan.

Third-place winners were Melissa Ginsberg, $5,000, South Shore High School, Brooklyn, and Jeff Kaplan, $5,000, Bayside High School, Queens.

Fourth-place winners were Lily Lin, $3,000, JHS 158, Brooklyn, and Daniel Seda, $3,000, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Brooklyn.

Fifth-prize winners, who each received $2,000 in bonds, were: Joann Acevedo, PS 131, Brooklyn; Emilio Caban, PS 54, Staten Island; Jackson Chan, JHS 168, Flushing, Queens; Charles Chapman, High School of Graphic Arts, Manhattan; Ann Marie Diaz, St. Vincent Ferrer High School, Manhattan; Richard Diaz, PS 20, Flushing, Queens; Jude Dominique, Forest Hills High School, Queens; Melissa Huebler, PS 166, Long Island City, Queens; Mark Pelligrini, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan; Michael Sande, Midwood High School, Brooklyn; Matthew Sarnoff, Hunter High School, Manhattan; David Skyler, JHS 68, Brooklyn; Huey Truong, JHS 157, Forest Hills, Queens, and Linda Tsang, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan.

Photos by Luciana Whitaker-1) Top winners James Jackson and Nigel Ricketts 2) Contest sponsor Joe Cherner holds up sign by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts

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SECTION 2; FEATURES
ON THE TOWN

Tobacco heir lights out against smoking

Ann Gerber
1,802 words
30 March 1988
Chicago Sun-Times
FIVE STAR SPORTS FINAL
33

((PHOTO CAPTION CONTINUED)) Kathy Abelson at SRO Joffrey Ballet benefit. ABOVE: James Bidwell, new chair of Chicago Convention and Visitors Bureau, with Sharon Gist Gilliam, mayor's chief of staff. Bidwell is veep of Merchandise Mart Properties. LEFT: Marion Simon will receive Senior Centers community service award April 10 at an Alcott & Andrews brunch. Steven Wade, son of the Burton Wades, will play his "Banjo Dancing" April 8 for the Chicago Historical Society Guild debut of new construction. ((CAPTION ENDS))

I'm glad I don't have to explain to a man from Mars why each day I set fire to dozens of little pieces of paper and then put them in my mouth. Mignon McLaughlin

Patrick Reynolds, 39, is hoping his Reynolds Stop Smoking Program will become as well known as the tobacco company his granddaddy founded. "Chewing tobacco caused cancer and killed grandpa, and emphysema ended my father's life at 58," Reynolds said.

"I resolved to sell my stock in the family business, stop smoking forever and try to help others from dying for a senseless habit," he said. "Two to 3 million people a year die worldwide. We must work to ban all cigarette ads, ban smoking in airplanes, demand clean air indoors, place heavy taxes on cigarette packs."

Surgeon General C. Everett Koop has praised young Reynolds, who is a spokesman for the American Lung Association. Medical and fitness experts created the cassettes in his anti-smoking program that address the psychological reasons for smoking and quitters' fear of gaining weight. They also developed beta carotene supplements that are said to restore body tissue damaged by smoking. It is a seven-day regimen; to get it, call (1-800) 445-3274.

The only way to stop smoking is to just stop - no ifs, no ands and no butts.

Gossip, gossip, gossip

Women are going to line up for well-known architect Dirk Lohan, grandson of legendary Mies van der Rohe. Two weeks ago, at Dirk's 50th birthday, wife and fellow architect Diane Leggee was all sweetness and love, but today it is over. (Savvy women suddenly will need advice on how to rebuild their mansions.)

Talking about divorces, pizza king Marshall Bauer paid big mozzarella to win his freedom from sexy blond Margaret Bauer, who operates the wee and exclusive antiques shop east of the Drake Hotel. But don't order "everything to go." Pals report he is madly in love with the beautiful Susan Danenberg.

Governor Jerry? State Treasurer Jerry Cosentino isn't denying rumors that he'd like to run for that office.

Report on the rich and famous

Jonathon Brandmeier, WLUP's morning star, and wife Lisa (daughter of restaurateur Angelo Nicelli of Cafe Angelo's) are home from Acapulco, where he filmed a cameo with Dennis Farina for NBC's "Crime Story."

On the road to Bali, Bangkok and Hong Kong are Lee and Marilyn Miglin with son Duke. . . . The Z. Franks of auto fame hired witty accordionist Agnes Sampson of Lincolnwood to entertain at their Palm Springs parties.

Home from Europe are Rich and Martha Melman and interior designer Trudy Glossberg. Trudy is creating the new Traffic Jam nightspot on Ontario, venture of John and Gerry Mau and Bear biggies Kevin Butler and Dan Hampton.

Helen Mangam, legendary nightclub owner, marked her 90th birthday at a party given by her daughter Joan (Mrs. Charles) Wegner III.

The E.B. Smiths Jr. are off to Aspen for skiing, but Peter, 9, is most excited about being batboy April 30 for the White Sox, a treat mother Maureen bid for at the Lake Forest Country Day School benefit.

Ivana Trump, Charlotte Ford and Betsy Bloomingdale join fashionable Chicagoans in wearing the flirty, feminine clothes of designer Victor Costa, who has his own boutique in Marshall Field's State Street store. His new collection was paraded at a Field's luncheon for the Hubbard Street Dance Company as a prelude to its April 29 performance and dinner at the Fairmont. In the crowd admiring the sensuous straplesses and romantic florals were Eve Heffer, Jane O'Connor, Janet Newman, Bev Blettner, Susan Grimm, Kay Husman, Linda Robin, Flo Liphardt, Edie Clonan, Kassie Davis, Averill Leviton, Kathy Abelson, Annette Berry, Meta Berger, Lynn Turner, Corinne Brophy, Linda MacLennan, Ilene Greenfield, Josie Strauss, Carol Patt, Jo Deutsch and the Barry Stagmans. Gala chair Shirley Kravitt was in Palm Springs and missed the elegant party. Happy vibes are sewn into every Costa creation.

Joffrey gala rates bravos

"Upbeat, inspiring, a tribute to a great artist," said Meta Berger, speaking for the Chicago Committee for Joffrey Ballet Friday night at the benefit dinner in the Empire Room after a magnificent performance by the ballet corps mourning its leader. The supper dance attended by 350 toasted Robert Joffrey, who died that morning. His first performance was here in 1957. Stanley Paul played as guests savored shrimp salad, duck, baked Alaska. In the crowd were the Oscar D'Angelos, the Dino D'Angelos, Kathy Abelson, Max Eidelhuber, Frank Morreal, Russell Carter, the Harold Jacobses, the William McKittricks, Gary MacDougal, corporate chairman; Pam Stone, the Dan Pesches, Dana Treister, the Kevin Tynans, the Art Nielsens, Ben Borenstein, Lee Schuessler, the Judd Weinbergs, the Louis Bergers and the Don Lubins.

The $5,000 tables for the April 12 Mayor Washington Foundation gala are selling well, reports chairman Geraldine Freund. Business, professional and civic leaders are adding support and politicians are rushing to be included. Sen. Paul Simon, Mayor Sawyer and Ald. Tim Evans all bought tables.

Pals sang happy birthday to Nancy Ciardelli of Oak Brook at a party in the posh Mid-America Club hosted by Charles III and Joan Wegner. In the group were Nancy's husband, lawyer Vic; Bill and Carol Parrillo, John and Dr. Mary Ann Malloy. Mid-America manager Axel Grove arranged for the ultimate birthday cake, chocolate, stuffed with mousse and loving wishes.

Samantha, first child, chose "Memories of China" for dinner and brought along parents Gov. James Thomspon and Jayne. . . . Mary Lou Maher of Glorious Hats will show her chapeaux at the Chas. A. Stevens New Image Fashion Show tomorrow at the Fairmont.

Classy Chicagoans

"Frank Olive has done more for horse breeding than the Calumet Farms," insisted Helen (Mrs. Sam) Casey at the luncheon in Neiman-Marcus, where the famous hat designer met Ladies Who Lunch and Wear Hats. Helen said the best-dressed women at the Kentucky Derby all wear Olive hats. In the group were Kay Husman, Phyllis Caplin, Casey, Cookie Stagman and Zarada Gowenlock.

Actresses Joan Collins, Morgan Fairchild, Loretta Young, Bette Midler and Diana Ross all don Frank Olive chapeaux. Among best customers is Evangeline Gouletas Carey, who has them by the dozens. (Men love women in hats.)

Congrats to Lee Phillip and Bill Bell. Their "The Young and the Restless" soap is 15 years old this week and their husky baby, "Bold and the Beautiful," is 1. . . . Pusha, facial expert at the Mayfair Regent who keeps Bonnie Swearingen and Laurel Blair looking beautiful, now works in Oak Brook one day a week for plastic surgeon Dr. Eugene Tanski, teaching skin care and makeup techniques. . . . The consul general of Italy and Mrs. Leonardo Baroncelli held a reception Monday in their home. . . . Phyllis Del Gatto Caplin was cheered on her birthday at a Spiaggia luncheon attended by Camille Hatzenbuehler, Kay Husman, Bev Blettner, Barbara Lee Cohen, Anne Romanucci, Elizabeth Arden manager Phoebe Barry, Bianca Daddono and Pamela Sage. Even owner Larry Levy congratulated the stunning redhead.

Field's fur buyer Stephen Sanders gave the keynote speech at the American International Fur Fair in New York. . . . Dynamite blond Ev Heffer (so smart she does her own complicated income tax) flew to New York for pal Chryssa's show of her sculpture at the Leo Castelli Gallery. . . . Roberta Walker, wife of former Gov. Dan Walker, serving time in Duluth, Minn., is keeping busy with her Beloux knitwear firm. She showed her fall line in New York. . . . Tennis legend Frank Parker of McClurg Courts jets to Palm Springs for the Nabisco/Dinah Shore LPGA Golf Classic.

TV's "Golden Girl" Betty White, who plays Rose on the popular series, charmed fans at her Field's autographing stint Friday. "I was born here but left at 1 year old when my parents relocated. Thursday Field's executives took me to dine at the Everest Club, and I loved it," the bubbly blond reported. "I'll miss my co-stars this summer. Bea Arthur is going to Australia, Rue McClanahan to Russia, Estelle Getty to New Zealand, and me? I'm going to Denver and Phoenix." White, spokesman for the Morris Animal Foundation, adores pets. Sharing her home are a retired seeing-eye dog, two other canines and a black cat who adopted them all.

Poor Stephanie Sockel never had a Sweet 16 party, so she evened the score with a Sour 17 bash at Leslee's in Evanston. . . . Clare Lemus is chair of the St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital luncheon April 9 at the Chicago Hilton with the Best of Chicago Designers, produced by Susan Glick. . . . Off on a Caribbean cruise for their wedding anniversary were Gilbert and Lillian Hansen of Palos Hills.

Billy Siegel of That Steak Joynt hosts tomorrow's luncheon for Bernard Sahlins' International Theater Festival. . . . Chicagoans in Palm Springs were the Jack Rosens, the Chester Schultzes, the Henry Manns, Ruth Baker and Sally Braude.

When bright and determined Sandra Nichols takes on a job, it is full steam ahead. Chair of the radio marathon for the Chicago Symphony, she has her mother, Jessie Curran, and her daughter, Kendra, working right along with her.

Dr. J. Dennis Freund is in Florida delivering papers on anxiety and fear and on depression, fields in which he is an expert. . . . Singer Tony Bennett, warbling April 12-17 at the Fairmont, will attend the Variety Club gala April 15 honoring Chicago Sun-Times publisher Bob Page and his wife, Nancy Merrill.

Designer Frank Olive met Phyllis CAplin at Neiman-Marcus luncheon. Peggy Matzie (left), Nieman-Marcus veep who was married last week to Hugh McCarthy Jr., and Cookie Stagman at Frank Olive hat bash. Lake Forest Academy alumni Jamaica; benefit April 9 gets boost from Patricia Rich (from left), Mariann Boe and William Barr Jr. LEFT: Ballerina Cynthia Gregory with artist Douglas Hofmann at Circle Gallery party for Cleveland-San Jose Ballet. RIGHT: Photographer Linda; Schwartz is in New York shooting celebs for NBC. Mike Kutza and Cookie Cohen plan April 11 Cinema/Chicago Academy Awards party at First National Bank. LEFT: Ronald and Meta Berger at Joffrey gala in Empire Room. RIGHT: Max Eidelhuber and; Credit: Stuart-Rodgers-Reilly; Tony Romano;

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NEWS

QUEENS NEIGHBORHOODS QUEENS CLOSEUP Ads Look Good - Like Winners Should

By Jessie Mangaliman
898 words
1 April 1988
Newsday
QUEENS
29

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

One day last fall, James Jackson came home from school and told his mother he needed to borrow a tape recorder. Something about a rap, his mother, Linda, said. Typically for a 10-year-old, he didn't elaborate, of course. But his mother complied and asked no more.

Last month, James and his friend Nigel Ricketts, 11, stood before an audience at City Hall, television cameramen and newspaper photographers watching, their parents waiting, too, for the answer. They rapped about the un-cool qualities of smoking. "Whatever you're into, smoking is out. Because it will kill you, without a doubt." Then the boys shouted in unison: "DON'T DO IT!"

That's the winning refrain of a rap song written by the fifth-graders from PS 197 in Far Rockaway who entered it in a citywide antismoking advertisement contest.

Nigel and James split the first-prize $10,000 bond awarded by Wall Street trader Joe Cherner, who sponsored the contest. He gave out an additional $59,500 to 20 other school children from Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and Manhattan.

Cherner, who doesn't smoke, wanted this kind of peer-education campaign about the dangers of smoking. And it seems, from the results of the ad contest, which drew entries from more than 100,000 children, the lesson was well learned.

Other winning ads: "Cold Turkey Is Better Than Dead Duck," by Richard Diaz of PS 20 in Flushing; "If You Smoke . . . Why? Can't You Read?" by Heather Anderson of Midwood High School in Brooklyn, and "Smoking Is Cancer Country. Are You Dying to Go There?" by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts in Manhattan.

Hilde's DiGenearo kindergarten class from Maspeth received $100. They gave the most beguiling performance during the award ceremonies. "Smoking is bad, bad, bad!" they screamed.

"I thought by creating an ad contest, I could get young people to look critically at cigarette ads from start to finish," Cherner said. "Instead of just accepting the message that was put forth, I wanted them to create their own message.

"I was surprised at the sheer number of ads, and I was surprised by the quality of the ideas," he added.

Cherner, who spent his own money promoting the contest, said it will be an annual event. Just as the contest was being publicized, so, too, were the hazards of smoking, through dozens of speakers who visited city schools, including U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop; actor Patrick Reynolds who is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds; Dr. Ruth Westheimer, and city Health Commissioner Stephen Joseph.

Joseph's favorite ad was a poster by Cynthia Vera of PS 63 in Manhattan. It shows Snoopy on his doghouse, with the caption: "Dream of a World Without Cigarettes."

The judges chose good messengers. Nigel's parents, Lovena Ricketts and Iman Raheem, smoke. So does James' father, James Jackson Sr.

"I'm hoping to scare them into not smoking," Nigel said. At the award ceremony March 16, Lovena Ricketts said: "He's on our case all the time. This is the last time."

Jeff Kaplan, an 18-year-old senior from Bayside High School, won $5,000 for his video of a man, holding a pack of cigarettes, pointed at passengers in a plane. "Don't Take Hostages to Your Habit."

Kaplan has been smoking for four or five years. "Since then I've been trying to quit," he said. "This ad contest is making me think a lot about smoking."

Even Mayor Edward I. Koch, who praised Cherner for his work, commented on the winning ads. "It sounds to me like we're well on our way to a smokeless generation by the year 2000." Koch was one of the judges of the contest.

In January, Koch signed the Clean Indoor Air Act, antismoking legislation supported by Cherner. Koch had lunch with Cherner last July to discuss the contest. In return, Cherner donated $100,000, splitting it between Gay Men's Health Crisis and People for a Smoke-Free Indoors.

The meal launched the ad contest.

Second-place winners were Heather Anderson, $7,500 bond, Midwood High School, Brooklyn, and Cynthia Vera, $8,000 bond, PS 63, Manhattan.

Third-place winners were Jeff Kaplan, $5,000, of Bayside High School and Melissa Ginsberg, $5,000, of South Shore High School, Brooklyn.

Fourth-place winners were Lily Lin, $3,000, JHS 158, Brooklyn, and Daniel Seda, $3,000, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Brooklyn.

Fifth-prize winners, who each received $2,000 in bonds, were: Joann Acevedo, PS 131, Brooklyn; Emilio Caban, PS 54, Staten Island; Jackson Chan, JHS 168, Flushing; Charles Chapman, High School of Graphic Arts, Manhattan; Ann Marie Diaz, St. Vincent Ferrer High School, Manhattan; Richard Diaz, PS 20, Flushing; Jude Dominique, Forest Hills High School; Melissa Huebler, PS 166, Long Island City; Mark Pelligrini, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan; Michael Sande, Midwood High School, Brooklyn; Matthew Sarnoff, Hunter High School, Manhattan; David Skyler, JHS 68, Brooklyn; Huey Truong, JHS 157, Forest Hills, and Linda Tsang, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan.

Photos by Luciana Whitaker-1) Top winners James Jackson and Nigel Ricketts. 2) Contest sponsor Joe Cherner holds up sign by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts.

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NEWS

QUEENS NEIGHBORHOODS QUEENS CLOSEUP Ads Look Good - Like Winners Should

By Jessie Mangaliman
898 words
1 April 1988
Newsday
QUEENS
29

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

One day last fall, James Jackson came home from school and told his mother he needed to borrow a tape recorder. Something about a rap, his mother, Linda, said. Typically for a 10-year-old, he didn't elaborate, of course. But his mother complied and asked no more.

Last month, James and his friend Nigel Ricketts, 11, stood before an audience at City Hall, television cameramen and newspaper photographers watching, their parents waiting, too, for the answer. They rapped about the un-cool qualities of smoking. "Whatever you're into, smoking is out. Because it will kill you, without a doubt." Then the boys shouted in unison: "DON'T DO IT!"

That's the winning refrain of a rap song written by the fifth-graders from PS 197 in Far Rockaway who entered it in a citywide antismoking advertisement contest.

Nigel and James split the first-prize $10,000 bond awarded by Wall Street trader Joe Cherner, who sponsored the contest. He gave out an additional $59,500 to 20 other school children from Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and Manhattan.

Cherner, who doesn't smoke, wanted this kind of peer-education campaign about the dangers of smoking. And it seems, from the results of the ad contest, which drew entries from more than 100,000 children, the lesson was well learned.

Other winning ads: "Cold Turkey Is Better Than Dead Duck," by Richard Diaz of PS 20 in Flushing; "If You Smoke . . . Why? Can't You Read?" by Heather Anderson of Midwood High School in Brooklyn, and "Smoking Is Cancer Country. Are You Dying to Go There?" by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts in Manhattan.

Hilde's DiGenearo kindergarten class from Maspeth received $100. They gave the most beguiling performance during the award ceremonies. "Smoking is bad, bad, bad!" they screamed.

"I thought by creating an ad contest, I could get young people to look critically at cigarette ads from start to finish," Cherner said. "Instead of just accepting the message that was put forth, I wanted them to create their own message.

"I was surprised at the sheer number of ads, and I was surprised by the quality of the ideas," he added.

Cherner, who spent his own money promoting the contest, said it will be an annual event. Just as the contest was being publicized, so, too, were the hazards of smoking, through dozens of speakers who visited city schools, including U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop; actor Patrick Reynolds who is the grandson of R.J. Reynolds; Dr. Ruth Westheimer, and city Health Commissioner Stephen Joseph.

Joseph's favorite ad was a poster by Cynthia Vera of PS 63 in Manhattan. It shows Snoopy on his doghouse, with the caption: "Dream of a World Without Cigarettes."

The judges chose good messengers. Nigel's parents, Lovena Ricketts and Iman Raheem, smoke. So does James' father, James Jackson Sr.

"I'm hoping to scare them into not smoking," Nigel said. At the award ceremony March 16, Lovena Ricketts said: "He's on our case all the time. This is the last time."

Jeff Kaplan, an 18-year-old senior from Bayside High School, won $5,000 for his video of a man, holding a pack of cigarettes, pointed at passengers in a plane. "Don't Take Hostages to Your Habit."

Kaplan has been smoking for four or five years. "Since then I've been trying to quit," he said. "This ad contest is making me think a lot about smoking."

Even Mayor Edward I. Koch, who praised Cherner for his work, commented on the winning ads. "It sounds to me like we're well on our way to a smokeless generation by the year 2000." Koch was one of the judges of the contest.

In January, Koch signed the Clean Indoor Air Act, antismoking legislation supported by Cherner. Koch had lunch with Cherner last July to discuss the contest. In return, Cherner donated $100,000, splitting it between Gay Men's Health Crisis and People for a Smoke-Free Indoors.

The meal launched the ad contest.

Second-place winners were Heather Anderson, $7,500 bond, Midwood High School, Brooklyn, and Cynthia Vera, $8,000 bond, PS 63, Manhattan.

Third-place winners were Jeff Kaplan, $5,000, of Bayside High School and Melissa Ginsberg, $5,000, of South Shore High School, Brooklyn.

Fourth-place winners were Lily Lin, $3,000, JHS 158, Brooklyn, and Daniel Seda, $3,000, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Brooklyn.

Fifth-prize winners, who each received $2,000 in bonds, were: Joann Acevedo, PS 131, Brooklyn; Emilio Caban, PS 54, Staten Island; Jackson Chan, JHS 168, Flushing; Charles Chapman, High School of Graphic Arts, Manhattan; Ann Marie Diaz, St. Vincent Ferrer High School, Manhattan; Richard Diaz, PS 20, Flushing; Jude Dominique, Forest Hills High School; Melissa Huebler, PS 166, Long Island City; Mark Pelligrini, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan; Michael Sande, Midwood High School, Brooklyn; Matthew Sarnoff, Hunter High School, Manhattan; David Skyler, JHS 68, Brooklyn; Huey Truong, JHS 157, Forest Hills, and Linda Tsang, High School of Art and Design, Manhattan.

Photos by Luciana Whitaker-1) Top winners James Jackson and Nigel Ricketts. 2) Contest sponsor Joe Cherner holds up sign by Charles Chapman of the High School of Graphic Arts.

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NEWS
KUP'S COLUMN

KUP'S COLUMN

835 words
7 April 1988
Chicago Sun-Times
FIVE STAR SPORTS FINAL
78

The Wisconsin primary indicates that celebrityhood doesn't always translate into votes. The Rev. Jesse Jackson was accorded adulation by huge crowds that assembled to hear him speak throughout the state. TV and the press received him as if he were the reigning movie star of the day. And he electrified his audiences with his rhyming rhetoric. Apparently most of the voters came to see but not to support, as Tuesday's decisive defeat by Gov. Mike Dukakis indicates.

THE POLITICAL SHOW, after playing the "hinterlands," now moves to the Big Time, with a one-day stand April 19 on Broadway. The big question in New York is, "Who, if anybody, will Gov. Mario Cuomo endorse?" Dukakis expects that endorsement, but insiders report Cuomo may be holding off at this time to avoid the embarrassment of Detroit Mayor Coleman Young, who endorsed Dukakis only to have Jackson score a major victory in Michigan. . . . Cuomo, incidentally, will be here Friday, along with Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.), to address a Democratic Senate campaign fund-raiser in the Fairmont Hotel.

SEN. PAUL SIMON, as predicted by Sun-Times political editor Steve Neal, will announce in Washington today that he is "suspending" his campaign. As we mentioned yesterday, that may make him eligible to receive an additional 47 delegates from the Illinois Democratic State Central Committee. . . . And, if we may paraphrase the title of the Broadway musical smash, Pat Robertson continues as the phantom of the campaign.

THANKS TO G. Heileman Brewing Co., Chicago will continue as a major player in conducting world-class marathons. The firm committed itself to a $3.9 million sponsorship over three years. And the $350,000 to be offered in prize money enables Chicago to compete for the best runners with New York and Boston. . . . Connie Stevens, opening at Drury Lane Oakbrook Terrace April 19, will be among VIPs at the Variety Club Celebrity Ball April 15 in the Hyatt Regency Chicago.

NOW HEAR THIS: Sarah Brady, wife of the White House press secretary, returns here April 22 at the invitation of State's Attorney Rich Daley to address the Victims' Rights Conference in McCormick Center Hotel. Sarah was honored here recently by the Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence. And Arthur Hartman, former ambassador to the Soviet Union, should have some interesting observations on Mikhail Gorbachev and glasnost when he addresses the Harvard Club of Chicago tonight at the University Club.

WE EXTEND a hearty welcome to Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the tobacco magnate, who riled his family by becoming an outspoken advocate of nonsmoking. He has moved to Chicago and established the Reynolds Goodman Corp. Its first project is marketing the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program. Patrick will be honored in D.C. today on the World's First No Tobacco Day, sponsored by the World Health Organization.

EDWARD JAMES OLMOS, best known as Lt. Martin Castillo on TV's "Miami Vice," will be in town today to address the Jobs for Progress conference in the Palmer House. He'll make a strong pitch to increase literacy among Hispanics. Olmos also is the star of a new movie, "Stand and Deliver," in which he plays a teacher who makes a difference in a tough L.A. school. Olmos was attracted to the role because "it celebrates education." Incidentally, he's not sure "Miami Vice" will be picked up.

THE SLIGHT rumble over re-election of City Treasurer Cecil Partee as vice chairman of the city Democratic Central Committee has dissipated, and Partee will win going away. Ald. Jesus Garcia, who sought to challenge Partee, probably will be rewarded later with another role. . . . Adding a year: Illinois' first lady Jayne Thompson, James Garner, David Frost, Ward Quaal and his son Graham, James Compton, Matt Lamb, Tony Dorsett, Wayne Rogers and Frances Ford Coppola. Anniverary greetings to Ramsey Lewis and Geri.

FORMER CHICAGOAN Steve Friedman, producer of the new "USA Today" TV show, told his audience at Ditka's yesterday that "the program will complement regular news shows and will break new ground in TV." The show debuts on Channel 5 Sept. 12. . . . Not for calorie counters: 17 chefs from Our Town's top restaurants will display their most creative desserts at Cricket's today in Bailey's Dessert Heaven Contest. Beneficiary: Boys and Girls Clubs of Chicago.

TONY BENNETT, who opens at the Fairmont Hotel on Tuesday, will be one of the stars at the 100th birthday celebration for Irving Berlin in Carnegie Hall on May 11. Tony's latest album, "Bennet/Berlin," is a tribute to the great composer. . . . Reminder to balletomanes: Cynthia Gregory, the premier danseuse, appears tonight with the Cleveland San Jose Ballet in the Opera House. . . . And Supreme Court reject Robert Bork told it at the United Republican Fund dinner: "I was in a group posing for a picture and the photographer asked me to move a bit to the left. That was the best political advice I've received this year."

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News

Globe honored for role in anti-smoking fight

452 words
8 April 1988
The Globe and Mail
A14

All material copyright Thomson Canada Limited or its licensors. All rights reserved.

The Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail is among 40 groups and individuals honored by the World Health Organization for their efforts in promoting tobacco-free societies.

Other Canadian honors went to the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics and to Michael Davies, publisher of the Kingston Whig-Standard , which was the first daily newspaper in Canada to ban tobacco advertising. All three will receive commemorative medals and certificates from the Geneva-based group.

On Aug. 27, 1986, The Globe became the first metropolitan newspaper in Canada to refuse to accept tobacco advertising. In an editorial published that day, The Globe urged the federal Government to move toward a ban on tobacco promotion.

"We do not suggest the ban lightly," the editorial said. "Nor have we lightly taken our own decision, effective today, to refuse advertisements promoting tobacco in The Globe and Mail."

The Globe's publisher, A. Roy Megarry , said yesterday that the decision was two or three years in the making. "When we did it, we did not set out to lead a parade."

Mr. Megarry - whose tobacco encounters consisted of five Woodbines smoked on a Saturday afternoon when he was 6 - said he consulted The Globe's editorial board and the consensus was that tobacco, "taken as directed," was harmful to not only the smoker but also those around him.

Tobacco advertisements generated $260,000 in revenue during the year before the ban, out of total Globe revenue of $160-million.

The Whig-Standard was commended for "voluntarily closing its pages to tobacco advertising effective Jan. 1, 1985."

The citation published by the Kingston paper yesterday says it was "the first daily newspaper in all of Canada to do so. By the decision to put its social conscience before its commercial interests . . . the newspaper has promoted WHO's concept of a tobacco-free society."

Mr. Davies, who quit smoking six years ago, said he was surprised to learn of the award.

The Calgary Winter Games was recognized for being the first smoke-free Olympics.

Others honored include: . Actor Larry Hagman, of the television series Dallas, an anti-smoking campaigner who carries a battery-operated fan to blow away smoke; . Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R. J. Reynolds tobacco company, for selling all his stock in the family business and calling for a smoke-free United States by the year 2000; . Tokyo taxi drivers Ryokichi Hirayama and Koichi Yasui for bringing about changes in laws to allow them to designate their cabs as smoke-free vehicles; . Former U.S. president Jimmy Carter, previously a supporter of the tobacco industry, who now endorses the concept of a smoke-free society.

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Grandson Of Tobacco Magnate Pushes Stop Smoking Kits

BRENDA C. COLEMAN
667 words
10 April 1988
The Associated Press

(Copyright 1988. The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

CHICAGO (AP) _ Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, is pouring his anti-smoking fervor into a behavior-modification kit to help people kick the habit.

Reynolds said in an interview Saturday he has set up headquarters in Chicago for his business, the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, which sells kits bearing the same name.

The kit, being test-marketed in 20 cities, contains audio cassettes, a workbook and a 30-day supply of beta carotene, a naturally occurring nutrient that some studies have suggested may reduce lung cancer risk, he said.

The kit is just the latest effort by Reynolds, 39, who has become an increasingly active anti-smoking campaigner since he gave up cigarettes four years ago. He has promoted his message in television talk show appearances, letters to the president and in congressional testimony.

His efforts attracted the attention of the World Health Organization, which honored Reynolds at a Washington ceremony Friday along with other activists including Victoria Brynner, daughter of lung cancer victim Yul Brynner, actor Larry Hagman and former President Jimmy Carter.

Reynolds' motive is a very personal one.

"My grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, helped popularize smoking in America ... and I want to do everything I can, now that we know how dangerous it is, to help people stop," he said Saturday.

Reynolds said his only memories of his father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., are "of a man lying down gasping for breath.

"He died of emphysema at 58 ... caused by his cigarette habit, when I was 15."

Though Reynolds took up the habit four years later, "for the usual reasons, wanting to attract older girls and so on," he stopped in 1984 and became "increasingly disturbed about what was going on.

"And I found that cigarettes, for example, were the most heavily advertised products in all of America. Tobacco companies were spending over $2 billion a year advertising cigarettes. That amounts to $8 a year for every man, woman and child in this country."

Believing cigarette companies target their ads at the young, Reynolds testified in 1986 before Congress in favor of a ban on all cigarette advertising.

He said he also has pushed for raising cigarette taxes, banning smoking on airplanes and enacting tough clean indoor air laws, and has endorsed a project to support product liability lawsuits against tobacco companies.

Calls to the Tobacco Institute in Washington on Sunday were not answered. The tobacco industry claims no link between smoking and disease has ever been proven.

Reynolds' activities have drawn criticism from his siblings, who have claimed his campaign is a publicity stunt. The tobacco heir has just completed a book about his family, due out next year with the tentative title, "The Gilded Leaf: Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and Fortune."

But Reynolds said he has given up his acting career, which included a number of television appearances and the lead role in the science fiction movie "Eliminators," to devote all of his time to anti-smoking activities.

In his new venture, he said he has sold about 11,000 of his behavior-modification kits at $19.88 each since he began marketing them last Christmas through a toll-free telephone number advertised on television. He also plans to market the kits to corporations and hospitals.

The man who inherited $2.5 million from his grandfather when he turned 21 but later sold his stock in RJR Nabisco Inc., the conglomerate that runs the family tobacco company, said he plans to donate a substantial portion of the profit from the kits to the American Lung Association, American Cancer Society and other anti-smoking groups.

Reynolds serves as a "roving ambassador" for the American Lung Association, spokeswoman Elaine Chapnick said Sunday.

But she said Reynolds' stop-smoking kit has not been evaluated by the association, which sells its own kit containing a videotape, audiotape and workbook for $59.95 through local lung associations.

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NEWS
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

TIMES NEWS SERVICES
131 words
11 April 1988
The Seattle Times
FIRST
A3

Tobacco is the name,

quitting is the game

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, is pouring his anti-smoking fervor into a behavior-modification kit to help people kick the habit.

Reynolds has set up Chicago headquarters for the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program.

The kit is just the latest effort by Reynolds, 39, who has become an increasingly active anti-smoking campaigner since he gave up cigarettes four years ago. He has pressed the issue on TV talks shows, in letters to the president and in congressional testimony.

Reynolds said his only memories of his father are ``of a man lying down gasping for breath. He died of emphysema at 58 . . . caused by his cigarette habit, when I was 15.''

Caption: CHH

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NEWS

Briefly

159 words
11 April 1988
USA Today
FINAL
02A

Former Democratic vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro blames herself for son John Zaccaro Jr.'s conviction Saturday of selling cocaine to undercover officer. She says he was set up; he'll appeal. ... Tony Aliengena, 9, landed small plane Saturday in California to claim record as youngest pilot to fly across USA and back. ... Archbishop John Quinn, 59, who shocked San Francisco area Catholics last November by leaving on sabbatical to learn how to cope with stress, returned to work Saturday ``completely refreshed.'' ... Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, is test-marketing in 20 USA cities a behavior-modification kit to help people kick smoking. ... Eleanor Mondale, 28, daughter of former vice president Walter Mondale, married Chicago Bears offensive tackle Keith Van Horne, 30, Saturday in Hudson, Wis.

CUTLINE:NEWLYWEDS: Eleanor Mondale and Keith Van Horne

Reported by Sally Ann Stewart and Lauralee Mencum

PHOTO;b/w,AP(HF,Eleanor Mondale,Keith Van Horne,O)

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NEWS

PEOPLE

1,360 words
11 April 1988
Newsday
NASSAU AND SUFFOLK
09

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

Worst actor (dis)honors for Cosby, Madonna

Madonna became a two-time loser in Hollywood last night, slinking away for the second straight year with the Golden Raspberry award as the past year's worst actress.

But the night's biggest Bronx cheers went to Bill Cosby, who was saddled with an unprecedented triple crown: Cosby was dishonored at the Worst Achievement in Film awards ceremony as the worst actor, writer and producer of 1987.

It was no easy matter for Madonna to obtain her two consecutive worst-actress Razzies. She needed two almost unbelievably disastrous pictures as vehicles - and she got them.

Last year, she had "Shanghai Surprise," filmed with her husband, Sean Penn. This year, she did it by herself in "Who's That Girl?" with a performance The Wall Street Journal called "frightening." Although the movie itself didn't get the worst-picture Razzie, it came close in the balloting by 185 film critics, professionals and frequent movie-goers from around the United States and Canada.

Worst picture dishonors this year went to Cosby's "Leonard Part 6," a $27-million fiasco. Leonard not only had to beat out Madonna's loser, but also worsted the likes of "Ishtar," "Jaws: The Revenge" and "Tough Guys Don't Dance."

Not to worry about the other worstfilm nominees: They may not have gotten the overall Razzie, but they did plenty bad enough in other categories.

Norman Mailer and Elaine May, directors respectively of "Tough Guys" and "Ishtar," tied for the worst director dishonor.

One reason Cosby got the worst actor award was that voters didn't feel they could give it to the other-than-human "Bruce the Shark," star of the latest "Jaws" sequel. Bruce, however, was given a special Razzie for worst career achievement as a result of his monstrous work in "Jaws," "Jaws 2," "Jaws 3-D" and last year's "Jaws: The Revenge."

Other actors roundly Razzed in the eighth annual parody of the often pompous Academy Awards were Daryl Hannah in "Wall Street" as worst supporting actress and young David Mendenhall, who took dishonors as both worst supporting actor and worst new star for his performance as the insufferable, whining son of Sylvester Stallone in "Over the Top."

Stallone himself is no stranger to the Razzies. He was dishonored as worst actor in 1985 for his work in both "Rambo: First Blood Part II" and "Rocky IV." In 1984 he was worst actor for "Rhinestone."

"I Want Your Sex," the overdone ditty from "Beverly Hills Cop II," undercame four other nominees in the contest for worst song. The worst-song Razzie again was the evening's lowlight, as lyrics from each of the nominees were subjected to dramatic readings before the dishonoree was announced.

Other candidates included "El Coco Loco (So, So Bad)" from "Who's That Girl?" "Let's Go to Heaven in My Car" from "Police Academy 4," "You Can Be a Garbage Pail Kid" from "Garbage Pail Kids' Movie" and "Million Dollar Mystery" from the movie of the same name. Kick-the-habit kit to be sold by tobacco heir

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, is pouring his anti-smoking fervor into a behavior-modification kit to help people kick the habit.

Reynolds said in an interview Saturday he has set up headquarters in Chicago for a new business called the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, which will sell kits bearing the same name.

The kit, being test-marketed in 20 cities, contains audio cassettes, a workbook and a 30-day supply of beta carotene, a naturally occurring nutrient that some studies have suggested may reduce lung-cancer risk, he said.

The kit is just the latest effort by Reynolds, 39, who has become an increasingly active anti-smoking campaigner since he gave up cigarettes four years ago. He has promoted his message in television talk show appearances, letters to the president and in congressional testimony.

His efforts attracted the attention of the World Health Organization, which honored Reynolds at a Washington ceremony Friday along with other activists including Victoria Brynner, daughter of lung cancer victim Yul Brynner, actor Larry Hagman and former President Jimmy Carter.

Reynolds' motive is a very personal one.

"My grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, helped popularize smoking in America . . . and I want to do everything I can, now that we know how dangerous it is, to help people stop," he said Saturday.

Reynolds said his only memories of his father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., are "of a man lying down gasping for breath.

"He died of emphysema at 58 . . . caused by his cigarette habit, when I was 15."

Reynolds' activities have drawn criticism from his siblings, who have claimed his campaign is a publicity stunt. The tobacco heir has just completed a book about his family, due out next year with the tentative title, "The Gilded Leaf: Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and Fortune." Bitty baby heads home

Hannah Louise Tyler, the nation's second-smallest surviving infant, has gone home at last.

When she was born 11 weeks premature Nov. 5, Hannah weighed in at 14 ounces, just one ounce more than the nation's smallest surviving infant. When she left the hospital in Denver Saturday, she was a relatively hefty 6 pounds.

During most of her five-month hospital stay, Hannah has been attached to a respirator, but doctors say her lungs sustained little damage and they have detected no signs of brain damage or other major problems.

"She has avoided any major complications," said neonatologist Dan Hall. "We have no evidence of any significant lifetime handicap."

"I knew she was a fighter," said Hannah's mother, Kathy Kotlen, 35. "She's kind of got that inner strength."

Hannah's father, Morgan Tyler, 42, a professional contract bridge player, said his daughter is alive only because "the physicians and staff chose to put out the effort."

Hannah will continue to receive a small amount of oxygen at home through a tube to help aid her growth. A pediatrician will see her once a week, and a physical therapist will help Hannah's mother develop exercises for the child. Author honored by alma mater

Novelist Saul Bellow can add the highest honor of his alma mater to his other awards, which include the Nobel and Pulitzer prizes for literature.

Bellow, the author of "Herzog," "Mr. Sammler's Planet" and other works, has won Northwestern University's Alumni Medal, the school, in Evanston, Ill., said Saturday. The 1937 graduate of Northwestern received the school's College of Arts and Sciences Merit Award in 1958 and an honorary doctor of letters degree in 1962.

Bellow, a professor at the University of Chicago and lecturer at Oxford University, also lists among his honors the Croix de Chavalier des Arts et Lettres and the Legion of Honor from France.

His most recent works are "Him With His Foot in His Mouth and Other Stories" in 1984 and "More Die of Heartbreak" in 1987. Talking trash about DeBarge

The former landlord of El DeBarge is suing the pop singer for $12,000 for damage allegedly done to an apartment he leased in Grand Rapids, Mich., officials said.

According to the suit filed Friday by Grand River Investment Co., DeBarge leased the house from Sept. 11, 1984, until he was evicted in January, 1986. An inspection after his eviction found damage to the landscaping, interior walls, broken windows, damaged kitchen cupboards, curtains, carpet and other items, the lawsuit said.

"The place was just trashed," said Stephen Ryan, the attorney for the company, who said DeBarge lived in the house with his parents.

DeBarge's uncle, the Rev. William Abney, said the allegations were ridiculous.

"They're picking on him," Abney said. "No other large city would have treated a star of this magnitude like this."

DeBarge reached the top of the pop music charts with the single "Who's Johnny?" as well as several songs performed with family members in the singing group DeBarge.

Photos-1) Madonna. 2) Bill Cosby. 3) AP Photo-Hannah is cuddled by sister Molly before leaving the hospital

Document nday000020020503dk4b02u5u

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

NEWS

PEOPLE

1,360 words
11 April 1988
Newsday
NASSAU AND SUFFOLK
09

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

Worst actor (dis)honors for Cosby, Madonna

Madonna became a two-time loser in Hollywood last night, slinking away for the second straight year with the Golden Raspberry award as the past year's worst actress.

But the night's biggest Bronx cheers went to Bill Cosby, who was saddled with an unprecedented triple crown: Cosby was dishonored at the Worst Achievement in Film awards ceremony as the worst actor, writer and producer of 1987.

It was no easy matter for Madonna to obtain her two consecutive worst-actress Razzies. She needed two almost unbelievably disastrous pictures as vehicles - and she got them.

Last year, she had "Shanghai Surprise," filmed with her husband, Sean Penn. This year, she did it by herself in "Who's That Girl?" with a performance The Wall Street Journal called "frightening." Although the movie itself didn't get the worst-picture Razzie, it came close in the balloting by 185 film critics, professionals and frequent movie-goers from around the United States and Canada.

Worst picture dishonors this year went to Cosby's "Leonard Part 6," a $27-million fiasco. Leonard not only had to beat out Madonna's loser, but also worsted the likes of "Ishtar," "Jaws: The Revenge" and "Tough Guys Don't Dance."

Not to worry about the other worstfilm nominees: They may not have gotten the overall Razzie, but they did plenty bad enough in other categories.

Norman Mailer and Elaine May, directors respectively of "Tough Guys" and "Ishtar," tied for the worst director dishonor.

One reason Cosby got the worst actor award was that voters didn't feel they could give it to the other-than-human "Bruce the Shark," star of the latest "Jaws" sequel. Bruce, however, was given a special Razzie for worst career achievement as a result of his monstrous work in "Jaws," "Jaws 2," "Jaws 3-D" and last year's "Jaws: The Revenge."

Other actors roundly Razzed in the eighth annual parody of the often pompous Academy Awards were Daryl Hannah in "Wall Street" as worst supporting actress and young David Mendenhall, who took dishonors as both worst supporting actor and worst new star for his performance as the insufferable, whining son of Sylvester Stallone in "Over the Top."

Stallone himself is no stranger to the Razzies. He was dishonored as worst actor in 1985 for his work in both "Rambo: First Blood Part II" and "Rocky IV." In 1984 he was worst actor for "Rhinestone."

"I Want Your Sex," the overdone ditty from "Beverly Hills Cop II," undercame four other nominees in the contest for worst song. The worst-song Razzie again was the evening's lowlight, as lyrics from each of the nominees were subjected to dramatic readings before the dishonoree was announced.

Other candidates included "El Coco Loco (So, So Bad)" from "Who's That Girl?" "Let's Go to Heaven in My Car" from "Police Academy 4," "You Can Be a Garbage Pail Kid" from "Garbage Pail Kids' Movie" and "Million Dollar Mystery" from the movie of the same name. Kick-the-habit kit to be sold by tobacco heir

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, is pouring his anti-smoking fervor into a behavior-modification kit to help people kick the habit.

Reynolds said in an interview Saturday he has set up headquarters in Chicago for a new business called the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, which will sell kits bearing the same name.

The kit, being test-marketed in 20 cities, contains audio cassettes, a workbook and a 30-day supply of beta carotene, a naturally occurring nutrient that some studies have suggested may reduce lung-cancer risk, he said.

The kit is just the latest effort by Reynolds, 39, who has become an increasingly active anti-smoking campaigner since he gave up cigarettes four years ago. He has promoted his message in television talk show appearances, letters to the president and in congressional testimony.

His efforts attracted the attention of the World Health Organization, which honored Reynolds at a Washington ceremony Friday along with other activists including Victoria Brynner, daughter of lung cancer victim Yul Brynner, actor Larry Hagman and former President Jimmy Carter.

Reynolds' motive is a very personal one.

"My grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, helped popularize smoking in America . . . and I want to do everything I can, now that we know how dangerous it is, to help people stop," he said Saturday.

Reynolds said his only memories of his father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., are "of a man lying down gasping for breath.

"He died of emphysema at 58 . . . caused by his cigarette habit, when I was 15."

Reynolds' activities have drawn criticism from his siblings, who have claimed his campaign is a publicity stunt. The tobacco heir has just completed a book about his family, due out next year with the tentative title, "The Gilded Leaf: Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and Fortune." Bitty baby heads home

Hannah Louise Tyler, the nation's second-smallest surviving infant, has gone home at last.

When she was born 11 weeks premature Nov. 5, Hannah weighed in at 14 ounces, just one ounce more than the nation's smallest surviving infant. When she left the hospital in Denver Saturday, she was a relatively hefty 6 pounds.

During most of her five-month hospital stay, Hannah has been attached to a respirator, but doctors say her lungs sustained little damage and they have detected no signs of brain damage or other major problems.

"She has avoided any major complications," said neonatologist Dan Hall. "We have no evidence of any significant lifetime handicap."

"I knew she was a fighter," said Hannah's mother, Kathy Kotlen, 35. "She's kind of got that inner strength."

Hannah's father, Morgan Tyler, 42, a professional contract bridge player, said his daughter is alive only because "the physicians and staff chose to put out the effort."

Hannah will continue to receive a small amount of oxygen at home through a tube to help aid her growth. A pediatrician will see her once a week, and a physical therapist will help Hannah's mother develop exercises for the child. Author honored by alma mater

Novelist Saul Bellow can add the highest honor of his alma mater to his other awards, which include the Nobel and Pulitzer prizes for literature.

Bellow, the author of "Herzog," "Mr. Sammler's Planet" and other works, has won Northwestern University's Alumni Medal, the school, in Evanston, Ill., said Saturday. The 1937 graduate of Northwestern received the school's College of Arts and Sciences Merit Award in 1958 and an honorary doctor of letters degree in 1962.

Bellow, a professor at the University of Chicago and lecturer at Oxford University, also lists among his honors the Croix de Chavalier des Arts et Lettres and the Legion of Honor from France.

His most recent works are "Him With His Foot in His Mouth and Other Stories" in 1984 and "More Die of Heartbreak" in 1987. Talking trash about DeBarge

The former landlord of El DeBarge is suing the pop singer for $12,000 for damage allegedly done to an apartment he leased in Grand Rapids, Mich., officials said.

According to the suit filed Friday by Grand River Investment Co., DeBarge leased the house from Sept. 11, 1984, until he was evicted in January, 1986. An inspection after his eviction found damage to the landscaping, interior walls, broken windows, damaged kitchen cupboards, curtains, carpet and other items, the lawsuit said.

"The place was just trashed," said Stephen Ryan, the attorney for the company, who said DeBarge lived in the house with his parents.

DeBarge's uncle, the Rev. William Abney, said the allegations were ridiculous.

"They're picking on him," Abney said. "No other large city would have treated a star of this magnitude like this."

DeBarge reached the top of the pop music charts with the single "Who's Johnny?" as well as several songs performed with family members in the singing group DeBarge.

Photos-1) Madonna. 2) Bill Cosby. 3) AP Photo-Hannah is cuddled by sister Molly before leaving the hospital

Document nday000020030115dk4b007yi

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

PART II

Patrick Reynolds' Unlikely Crusade

By James Kindall
2,258 words
22 April 1988
Newsday
ALL EDITIONS
02

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

PATRICK Reynolds, six feet tall, 190 pounds, his body obviously used to daily workouts and his face as handsome as the movie star he almost became, strides across the gray pile carpeting in his Chicago brownstone office and sticks out a hand. Explaining he is just back from a round of television talk shows in New York, he adds a "Pardon me," then turns at word of a wire report about him being picked up internationally. "The London Daily Mail will get the word out all over Europe," he says, giving the goahead. "We may not sell much product, but it'll get the word out."

Leading past other offices of the Reynolds Goodwin Corp. he enters a small room distinguished only by a cluttered desk, a wall matted with taped-up articles, a softly hissing humidifier and a vintage poster of a smiling, very young Ronald Reagan hawking Chesterfields. Immediately, messages begin pouring in from phones and passing secretaries, a swirl of attention that continues all day. After hours of rambling talk, Patrick Reynolds - actor, author, grandson of tobacco magnate R. J. Reynolds and now nationally known antismoking activist - will rock back in his chair and sum up his confused, pampered and tortured life.

"So that's how Patrick Reynolds found what he is supposed to do in the world," he concludes. "And I hope that's the end of it, because I don't want to start something else." He laughs deeply. "Please, God, give me some peace."

The equanimity displayed by the 39-year-old former actor does indeed reflect the satisfaction of one who has found his mission. That it has taken this course involves a tale filled with irony, packed with larger-than-life characters, vast wealth, anger, rejection and - although this he denies vehemently - perhaps tinged with guilt. "Writers could have a field day with me," he says, a look of pleading in his eyes. "They could paint me this way or that. But," he sighs, ". . . you'll have to do what you have to do."

Painting a picture of Patrick Reynolds is not easy. He is best known as an antismoking proselyte. Traveling the nation, he crusades for clean-air laws, a ban on cigarette advertising, higher taxes on tobacco and lawsuits against tobacco companies by those with diseases related to smoking. That he is one of six grandsons of R. J. Reynolds, the man who in 1913 slapped a picture of a Barnum and Bailey circus camel on a pack of cigarettes and accumulated a vast fortune, is a media draw he has learned to milk with the savvy of an electronic evangelist.

A pack-a-day smoker for 15 years, Patrick Reynolds tried and failed to quit with such things as acupuncture, hypnosis and shock treatment. He succeeded in 1984 through a combination of those techniques and the realization that he was an addict who could "never have just one cigarette again." Now he says with pained earnestness, "I want people to understand I really really care about the death in this world that's going on from smoking."

The questions asked at his antismoking appearances are nearly always the same. For example, is he doing this out of guilt because of his family? "My grandfather didn't know the effects of smoking when he started his business," Patrick Reynolds says. "If I stopped to think about the guilt of the past, I would be paralyzed in the present. What I'm doing is concentrating on the positive, not the negative."

Although he says he decided not to exploit the family name in advertising for his three-month-old business, he doesn't hesitate to use it in his personal campaign. He sells a kit, the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, with vitamins, a personal-development guide and motivational tapes outlining a seven-day program designed by psychotherapist Dr. Wayne Dyer. Its $19.88 cost is the lowest of any stop-smoking plan in the nation, Reynolds claims.

He is willing to endure the notoriety that comes from using his family history as negative reinforcement for his antismoking cause. An oft-repeated anecdote concerns his father's emphysema. He says the memory of his emaciated father is one reason for his fierce antismoking feelings. This is the sort of story that gets him ink, lights, cameras, action.

`WHEN I WAS in South Carolina a couple of months ago, they had a clean-air bill before the legislature that was locked up in committee," he says. "By the time I left, they had it out of committee and ready to vote on in two days."

How much of his effort is self-serving and how much is genuine concern for the human toll of smoking is hard to break out. Disparaging words have been issued by his siblings, all of whom smoke. His half-broter, John of Winston-Salem, N. C., has been quoted as saying, "Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves." His older brother, Michael, also of Winston-Salem, who refers to his inherited Reynolds stock as a "cash cow," admits he can't figure out his sibling. "But Patrick is sincere," he adds. "He really believes in what he's doing. I don't agree with him, but {insincerity is} not one of the criticisms I would make of him." His 53-year-old half-brother, Rich- ard (Josh) Reynolds III, of Southern Pines, N. C., says, "It's fine. It's his business."

In his Chicago office, Patrick Reynolds, the black sheep of the tobacco family, radiates the insouciance of someone who has been given much and sees no reason not to anticipate more. Yet, the effect as he stares with wide blue-gray eyes and open expectation is of a likable, poor little rich kid perhaps neglected in the obscure ways of the ultra-wealthy. Getting him to talk about his family background (he has a book due out next year detailing the history) and the forces that led to his antismoking conversion is at first difficult, then he embraces the topic with enthusiasm. He is animated, sad, surprised, as if he has pulled open a creaky door into himself and become fascinated with the scenes inside.

"What a story," he says, his eyes glazd with wonder. "Really, my life . . ." Born the son of R. J. Reynolds Jr., a hard drinker who was handed a $28-million inheritance during the Great Depression and at one time financed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's "fireside chats," Patrick seemed blessed with unlimited prospects. His mother, a red-haired movie starlet, Marianne O'Brien, who turned his father's head to the extent that he divorced his first wife, leaving behind his four sons by that marriage, was a beauty who made a serious error during their seven-year marriage. She was caught having an affair with an international playboy, a transgression Patrick's father never forgave and one he himself has had trouble understanding.

"I asked her why once," he says. "She said, `There I was on the Riviera. I was young; I was beautiful. I was being courted, taken to parties every night. And your father was passed out on the yacht by five o'clock every afternoon.' "

The abandonment he felt after the divorce (he was 3) was something he never got over. He remembers looking up each time the door opened at his Connecticut boarding school wondering if his father would appear. At age 7, he wrote a letter reading, "Dear Dad. Where are you? I want to meet you. Your son, Patrick." Winding its way across the international fun spots where his father was traveling with his third wife (he married four times), the message finally found and touched R. J. Reynolds Jr. Patrick was sent for, but his father became ill just before the visit.

At a later meeting and during the two dozen times the son saw the father thereafter, Reynolds Jr. remained bedridden with emphysema, which killed him at age 58 and which Patrick blames for abbreviating their relationship. He holds up two fingers only a tiny space apart. "It was like I just missed him," he says.

In the early '70s, as a long-haired athlete on the rowing team at the University of California at Berkeley, he became interested in film, at one point making a documentary about campus activism that was shown at the Cannes Film Festival. This was another searching part of his life, he says, a time when he rented a mansion to mimic his father's lifestyle. But still a time he would say to himself, "Please God, give me something I can do that will tell me who I am."

He didn't have to worry about making a living: At age 21 he reportedly received $2.5 million in stock from his grandparents. But that did not ease the pain he said he and all his brothers felt at being disinherited by his father, whose last wife was his main heir. He now believes his dad was embittered because of the effects of his fortune on his own life and took the action out of concern for his sons rather than rejection.

With his film-making attempts floundering and his acting career a scorecard of near misses at big parts, Patrick Reynolds married a German woman in 1983 and went to work for her father, selling buses. Maybe this was what he should be doing, he thought.

A year later, his agent offered him the lead in a science-fiction thriller called "The Eliminators." Reynolds plays a "mandroid," halfman, half-machine. "You can rent it at video stores," he says. "It's a hoot."

Then, with one marriage, one bus-sales job and one sci-fi picture finished, he was again searching for the meaning of life. Increasingly bothered by reports of the effects of smoking, in 1979 he sold all his Reynolds Tobacco stock. His epiphany came in 1986 when he accompanied a friend on a Capitol Hill tour. During a meeting with Sen. Robert Packwood, then head of the Senate's tax-reform committee, he stood up, introduced himself as the grandson of R. J. Reynolds and asked why cigarettes were taxed much higher in Europe than in the United States. The senator began a roundabout explanation, then suddenly stopped. "Say," he said, "we're voting on this this afternoon. Why don't you come and testify?"

The sudden confrontation between principle and reality was unnerving. Patrick Reynolds declined and sat down. He returned to his home in Beverly Hills disturbed by his thoughts. The forces that pushed him into activism began when his Washington comment was picked up by a West Coast gossip column. A sympathetic reader urged him to phone the American Lung Association. After weeks of procrastinating, he did. What he learned about smoking became the turning point he had been searching for.

HE CONTACTED a congressional committee considering banning cigarette advertising in July, 1986 and testified with a conviction that led Dan Rather to describe him as "an electrifying witness against the very product that made his family fortune."

The attention and his no-smoking activism have not stopped. He rails against the sale of cigarettes abroad, the power of the industry's lobby and advertising, which he classifies as "the greatest single abuse of freedom of speech in history." Picking up a magazine, he points first to an ad featuring an attractive model and then to the small white box with the surgeon general's warning. `Where do your eyes go," he asks. "Do they go here, or here? I won't be satisfied until the advertising is the size of the warning and the warning the size of the advertising."

He bristles at the industry argument that cigarettes have never been proved to cause disease. "There have been thousands of studies that cigarettes cause cancer and heart disease and lung disease," he says heatedly. "Not that they are linked. They cause it."

His efforts have been recognized. This month he was honored by the World Health Organization. Asked if all this generates business for his fledgling firm, abusiness formed after a chance meeting with an anti smoking marketing executive on a plane, he responds with frustration. "Why do I get this?" The business was created as a way to pay his expenses on behalf of his campaign, he says. He plans to donate a "substantial" part of his profits - when the company makes a profit, he adds (11,000 kits have been sold) - to organizations such as the lung association. Should he be faulted for coming up with a way to save lives and make a living, too, he asks. "I could have just kept my inheritance in the bank and lived comfortably off the interest. I'm really putting my money where my mouth is."

Photos 1) The grandfather: R.J. Reynolds founded the family fortune on Camel cigarettes. 2) The father: R.J. Jr., with Marianne, Patrick's mother, died of emphysema. 3) The son: Before waging war on tobacco, Patrick starred in `The Eliminators.' 4) Photo by Jose More Photo-(Patrick Reynolds) 5) Color Cover Photo by Jose More-Patrick Reynolds; Black Sheep Of A Tobacco Family First Patrick Reynolds sold his stock in the family tobacco company. Then he quit his own 15-year habit. Now he's selling stop-smoking kits. Color Cover Photo by Jose More-Patrick Reynolds

Document nday000020020503dk4m02te0

 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

PART II

Patrick Reynolds' Unlikely Crusade

By James Kindall
2,258 words
22 April 1988
Newsday
ALL EDITIONS
02

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1988)

PATRICK Reynolds, six feet tall, 190 pounds, his body obviously used to daily workouts and his face as handsome as the movie star he almost became, strides across the gray pile carpeting in his Chicago brownstone office and sticks out a hand. Explaining he is just back from a round of television talk shows in New York, he adds a "Pardon me," then turns at word of a wire report about him being picked up internationally. "The London Daily Mail will get the word out all over Europe," he says, giving the goahead. "We may not sell much product, but it'll get the word out."

Leading past other offices of the Reynolds Goodwin Corp. he enters a small room distinguished only by a cluttered desk, a wall matted with taped-up articles, a softly hissing humidifier and a vintage poster of a smiling, very young Ronald Reagan hawking Chesterfields. Immediately, messages begin pouring in from phones and passing secretaries, a swirl of attention that continues all day. After hours of rambling talk, Patrick Reynolds - actor, author, grandson of tobacco magnate R. J. Reynolds and now nationally known antismoking activist - will rock back in his chair and sum up his confused, pampered and tortured life.

"So that's how Patrick Reynolds found what he is supposed to do in the world," he concludes. "And I hope that's the end of it, because I don't want to start something else." He laughs deeply. "Please, God, give me some peace."

The equanimity displayed by the 39-year-old former actor does indeed reflect the satisfaction of one who has found his mission. That it has taken this course involves a tale filled with irony, packed with larger-than-life characters, vast wealth, anger, rejection and - although this he denies vehemently - perhaps tinged with guilt. "Writers could have a field day with me," he says, a look of pleading in his eyes. "They could paint me this way or that. But," he sighs, ". . . you'll have to do what you have to do."

Painting a picture of Patrick Reynolds is not easy. He is best known as an antismoking proselyte. Traveling the nation, he crusades for clean-air laws, a ban on cigarette advertising, higher taxes on tobacco and lawsuits against tobacco companies by those with diseases related to smoking. That he is one of six grandsons of R. J. Reynolds, the man who in 1913 slapped a picture of a Barnum and Bailey circus camel on a pack of cigarettes and accumulated a vast fortune, is a media draw he has learned to milk with the savvy of an electronic evangelist.

A pack-a-day smoker for 15 years, Patrick Reynolds tried and failed to quit with such things as acupuncture, hypnosis and shock treatment. He succeeded in 1984 through a combination of those techniques and the realization that he was an addict who could "never have just one cigarette again." Now he says with pained earnestness, "I want people to understand I really really care about the death in this world that's going on from smoking."

The questions asked at his antismoking appearances are nearly always the same. For example, is he doing this out of guilt because of his family? "My grandfather didn't know the effects of smoking when he started his business," Patrick Reynolds says. "If I stopped to think about the guilt of the past, I would be paralyzed in the present. What I'm doing is concentrating on the positive, not the negative."

Although he says he decided not to exploit the family name in advertising for his three-month-old business, he doesn't hesitate to use it in his personal campaign. He sells a kit, the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, with vitamins, a personal-development guide and motivational tapes outlining a seven-day program designed by psychotherapist Dr. Wayne Dyer. Its $19.88 cost is the lowest of any stop-smoking plan in the nation, Reynolds claims.

He is willing to endure the notoriety that comes from using his family history as negative reinforcement for his antismoking cause. An oft-repeated anecdote concerns his father's emphysema. He says the memory of his emaciated father is one reason for his fierce antismoking feelings. This is the sort of story that gets him ink, lights, cameras, action.

`WHEN I WAS in South Carolina a couple of months ago, they had a clean-air bill before the legislature that was locked up in committee," he says. "By the time I left, they had it out of committee and ready to vote on in two days."

How much of his effort is self-serving and how much is genuine concern for the human toll of smoking is hard to break out. Disparaging words have been issued by his siblings, all of whom smoke. His half-broter, John of Winston-Salem, N. C., has been quoted as saying, "Our father and grandfather are probably spinning in their graves." His older brother, Michael, also of Winston-Salem, who refers to his inherited Reynolds stock as a "cash cow," admits he can't figure out his sibling. "But Patrick is sincere," he adds. "He really believes in what he's doing. I don't agree with him, but {insincerity is} not one of the criticisms I would make of him." His 53-year-old half-brother, Rich- ard (Josh) Reynolds III, of Southern Pines, N. C., says, "It's fine. It's his business."

In his Chicago office, Patrick Reynolds, the black sheep of the tobacco family, radiates the insouciance of someone who has been given much and sees no reason not to anticipate more. Yet, the effect as he stares with wide blue-gray eyes and open expectation is of a likable, poor little rich kid perhaps neglected in the obscure ways of the ultra-wealthy. Getting him to talk about his family background (he has a book due out next year detailing the history) and the forces that led to his antismoking conversion is at first difficult, then he embraces the topic with enthusiasm. He is animated, sad, surprised, as if he has pulled open a creaky door into himself and become fascinated with the scenes inside.

"What a story," he says, his eyes glazd with wonder. "Really, my life . . ." Born the son of R. J. Reynolds Jr., a hard drinker who was handed a $28-million inheritance during the Great Depression and at one time financed President Franklin D. Roosevelt's "fireside chats," Patrick seemed blessed with unlimited prospects. His mother, a red-haired movie starlet, Marianne O'Brien, who turned his father's head to the extent that he divorced his first wife, leaving behind his four sons by that marriage, was a beauty who made a serious error during their seven-year marriage. She was caught having an affair with an international playboy, a transgression Patrick's father never forgave and one he himself has had trouble understanding.

"I asked her why once," he says. "She said, `There I was on the Riviera. I was young; I was beautiful. I was being courted, taken to parties every night. And your father was passed out on the yacht by five o'clock every afternoon.' "

The abandonment he felt after the divorce (he was 3) was something he never got over. He remembers looking up each time the door opened at his Connecticut boarding school wondering if his father would appear. At age 7, he wrote a letter reading, "Dear Dad. Where are you? I want to meet you. Your son, Patrick." Winding its way across the international fun spots where his father was traveling with his third wife (he married four times), the message finally found and touched R. J. Reynolds Jr. Patrick was sent for, but his father became ill just before the visit.

At a later meeting and during the two dozen times the son saw the father thereafter, Reynolds Jr. remained bedridden with emphysema, which killed him at age 58 and which Patrick blames for abbreviating their relationship. He holds up two fingers only a tiny space apart. "It was like I just missed him," he says.

In the early '70s, as a long-haired athlete on the rowing team at the University of California at Berkeley, he became interested in film, at one point making a documentary about campus activism that was shown at the Cannes Film Festival. This was another searching part of his life, he says, a time when he rented a mansion to mimic his father's lifestyle. But still a time he would say to himself, "Please God, give me something I can do that will tell me who I am."

He didn't have to worry about making a living: At age 21 he reportedly received $2.5 million in stock from his grandparents. But that did not ease the pain he said he and all his brothers felt at being disinherited by his father, whose last wife was his main heir. He now believes his dad was embittered because of the effects of his fortune on his own life and took the action out of concern for his sons rather than rejection.

With his film-making attempts floundering and his acting career a scorecard of near misses at big parts, Patrick Reynolds married a German woman in 1983 and went to work for her father, selling buses. Maybe this was what he should be doing, he thought.

A year later, his agent offered him the lead in a science-fiction thriller called "The Eliminators." Reynolds plays a "mandroid," halfman, half-machine. "You can rent it at video stores," he says. "It's a hoot."

Then, with one marriage, one bus-sales job and one sci-fi picture finished, he was again searching for the meaning of life. Increasingly bothered by reports of the effects of smoking, in 1979 he sold all his Reynolds Tobacco stock. His epiphany came in 1986 when he accompanied a friend on a Capitol Hill tour. During a meeting with Sen. Robert Packwood, then head of the Senate's tax-reform committee, he stood up, introduced himself as the grandson of R. J. Reynolds and asked why cigarettes were taxed much higher in Europe than in the United States. The senator began a roundabout explanation, then suddenly stopped. "Say," he said, "we're voting on this this afternoon. Why don't you come and testify?"

The sudden confrontation between principle and reality was unnerving. Patrick Reynolds declined and sat down. He returned to his home in Beverly Hills disturbed by his thoughts. The forces that pushed him into activism began when his Washington comment was picked up by a West Coast gossip column. A sympathetic reader urged him to phone the American Lung Association. After weeks of procrastinating, he did. What he learned about smoking became the turning point he had been searching for.

HE CONTACTED a congressional committee considering banning cigarette advertising in July, 1986 and testified with a conviction that led Dan Rather to describe him as "an electrifying witness against the very product that made his family fortune."

The attention and his no-smoking activism have not stopped. He rails against the sale of cigarettes abroad, the power of the industry's lobby and advertising, which he classifies as "the greatest single abuse of freedom of speech in history." Picking up a magazine, he points first to an ad featuring an attractive model and then to the small white box with the surgeon general's warning. `Where do your eyes go," he asks. "Do they go here, or here? I won't be satisfied until the advertising is the size of the warning and the warning the size of the advertising."

He bristles at the industry argument that cigarettes have never been proved to cause disease. "There have been thousands of studies that cigarettes cause cancer and heart disease and lung disease," he says heatedly. "Not that they are linked. They cause it."

His efforts have been recognized. This month he was honored by the World Health Organization. Asked if all this generates business for his fledgling firm, abusiness formed after a chance meeting with an anti smoking marketing executive on a plane, he responds with frustration. "Why do I get this?" The business was created as a way to pay his expenses on behalf of his campaign, he says. He plans to donate a "substantial" part of his profits - when the company makes a profit, he adds (11,000 kits have been sold) - to organizations such as the lung association. Should he be faulted for coming up with a way to save lives and make a living, too, he asks. "I could have just kept my inheritance in the bank and lived comfortably off the interest. I'm really putting my money where my mouth is."

Photos 1) The grandfather: R.J. Reynolds founded the family fortune on Camel cigarettes. 2) The father: R.J. Jr., with Marianne, Patrick's mother, died of emphysema. 3) The son: Before waging war on tobacco, Patrick starred in `The Eliminators.' 4) Photo by Jose More Photo-(Patrick Reynolds) 5) Color Cover Photo by Jose More-Patrick Reynolds; Black Sheep Of A Tobacco Family First Patrick Reynolds sold his stock in the family tobacco company. Then he quit his own 15-year habit. Now he's selling stop-smoking kits. Color Cover Photo by Jose More-Patrick Reynolds

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STYLE
PERSONALITIES

PERSONALITIES

Chuck Conconi
Washington Post Staff Writer
498 words
4 May 1988
The Washington Post
FINAL
d03

White House press secretary James Brady and his wife Sarah attended the White House dinner for Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. What was surprising was that it marked the first such invitation to the Bradys in the nearly eight years of the Reagan administration. It may just be that the Reagans, smarting under the revelations of recent "kiss and tell" books, are grateful that Brady, in his book, written by Mollie Dickenson, was much friendlier to the first family. The book has been sold to the movies.

The Brady book, "Thumbs Up," reported that Brady, who was seriously wounded in the attempted assassination of President Reagan in 1981, had not been invited to anything significant at the White House, and that the president had never discussed the shooting with Brady. Brady sent an autographed copy of the book to Reagan, who called his longtime press aide in late January to say he liked it. Then things changed: The Bradys were invited to a Super Bowl party at the White House, a birthday party for the president and then last week's state dinner for Mulroney. Out and About

Hold onto your hats! The word is that perennial starlet Brooke Shields is in love and, as may be imagined, her mother is unhappy. The 23-year-old Shields reportedly has fallen for "Cheers" bartender Woody Harrelson, 25; and, according to the Boston Herald, ever-present mommy Teri Shields had this to say: "I just can't understand my daughter. I mean that man is way beneath her standing. She could have any man in the world, but now she says she's in love and that's that." But then, that sounds like what most parents think about their daughters' choices in men ...

The R.J. Reynolds family grew rich from tobacco. But Patrick Reynolds, the heir to the tobacco fortune, is in Miami promoting a new business venture, a $19.88 package of audio tapes, literature and vitamins called the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program. In words that must drive his board of directors crazy, the 39-year-old Reynolds said, "When my grandfather began manufacturing cigarettes at the turn of the century, he didn't know that smoking causes lung diseases, heart disease and cancer. Now that this has been absolutely proven, I want to help people to wake up to how poisonous cigarettes are." His grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, a tobacco chewer, died of pancreatic cancer. Patrick's father R.J. Reynolds Jr. died of emphysema; his mother Marianne O'Brien Reynolds developed heart disease and two aunts contracted emphysema and cancer. All were smokers ...

More comments on astrological stargazing at the White House. Joe Canzeri, former Reagan staff aide, said: "The only time I ever knew the president to go into outer space for advice was when he chose Don Regan to be his chief of staff" ...

PHOTO Caption: Brooke Shields Caption: Woody Harelson Caption: Patrick Reynolds

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TEMPO

A NEW LEAF A TOBACCO HEIR REJECTS THE LEGACY

Jon Anderson
1,951 words
18 May 1988
Chicago Tribune
SPORTS FINAL; C
1

Constantly interrupted by a buzzing telephone, Patrick Reynolds sat in his office on the third floor of a former townhouse at 10 E. Huron St., the fingers of one hand drumming his desk. On Line 1 a travel agent was booking a flight to Philadelphia for a speech. On Line 2 a receptionist reminded him of "an important creative meeting" before he hit the airport.

Small wonder that his calendar is awash with dates-to testify in Washington before congressional committees, to tape TV interviews, to make speeches. Along the lines of "Man Bites Dog," his story is a natural for the media. A grandson of tobacco tycoon R.J. Reynolds, the man who first urged Americans to "walk a mile for a Camel," Patrick Reynolds, 39, has become a star of the antismoking movement.

For the last two years, Reynolds has been speaking out on links between smoking and bad health, drawing notice from newspapers across the U.S. and Canada, from "NBC Nightly News," which talked about him for 5 full minutes, and from "CBS Evening News," whose anchor, Dan Rather, called Reynolds "an electrifying witness against the very product that made the family fortune."

His favorite review has come from the U.S. surgeon general. "Patrick Reynolds," C. Everett Koop said in a recent statement, "has distinguished himself as one of the nation's most influential advocates of a smoke-free America in his lectures, television appearances and congressional testimony."

All this is heady stuff for Reynolds, a television and movie actor whose previous best-known role was that of Manroid, a part-human, part-mechanical creature with a part-metal head in a film titled "Eliminators." Putting his acting career "on hold," Reynolds has decided to confront the family legacy, serving as a spokesman for health organizations that seek to warn of the dangers of smoking.

"When my grandfather introduced Camels, he didn't know about health hazards," Reynolds said in an interview. "He helped popularize smoking in America. Now, it's important to me to do everything in my power to discourage people from smoking. I've realized I can be a voice people listen to on this issue. I can make a difference, which is why I've decided to fully commit myself to the antismoking movement in America."

He is, after all, a name, a member of a far-flung family descended from tough-talking Richard Joshua Reynolds, who peddled tobacco after the Civil War and invested $2,400 to set up a plant to produce such chewing tobaccos as Red Apple, Hill Billy, Early Bird and Brown's Mule. Since then, RJ Reynolds Tobacco Co., now a unit of RJR Nabisco Inc., has become the nation's leading cigarette-maker, known for such brands as Winston, Salem, More and, of course, Camels.

But Patrick Reynolds also has personal reasons.

His grandfather, who chewed tobacco, died of cancer of the pancreas. Two of his grandfather's sisters, who were smokers, contracted emphysema and cancer. Patrick's mother, a heavy smoker, developed heart disease. Reynolds himself took up smoking when he was 18 "to look older and get in with older girls." Six years ago he quit after repeated attempts with the aid of hypnosis, acupuncture, electric shock, subliminal therapy and behavior modification.

"My only memory of my father, R.J. Reynolds Jr.," he added, "was of a man lying down, gasping for breath, dying from emphysema caused by cigarettes."

Reynolds plans to tell the family story in a book, "The Gilded Leaf," to be published next year by Little Brown & Co. It was not, for him, a particularly happy tale.

Besides the family tobacco interests, which boomed with the launch of Camels in 1913, the clan included a great-uncle who founded Reynolds Aluminum; an uncle who started Reynolds Securities; and Patrick's father, a onetime treasurer of the Democratic National Committee, mayor of Winston-Salem, N.C., and cofounder of Delta Air Lines.

His father was less successful at marriage. He divorced his first wife, a socialite, in 1946, to marry Patrick's mother, Marianne O'Brien, a film starlet. The move cost him $9 million. After divorcing O'Brien, with a $2 million settlement, he married his third wife, a Canadian, later accusing her of deriding the United States and salting his food, contrary to the advice of his doctor. In divorce proceedings, that wife called him an alcoholic who got drunk in Tahiti, Honolulu and Europe while cruising on his yacht and said he had ordered her ashore in Copenhagen. Later, Reynolds met his fourth and final wife, a German philosophy professor, aboard a liner on the China Sea and returned home to America, where he died of emphysema.

For Patrick, one of two children of the second marriage, it was a lonely childhood. "I didn't see my father for six years," he said. "When I was 9 and in boarding school in Miami, I sat down and wrote him a letter:

"Dear Dad,

"I want to meet you.

"Where are you? I'm your son, Patrick,

"Love, Patrick."

Reynolds mailed it to the last address he had. The letter was forwarded nine times, finally reaching his father in the South Pacific. A message came back setting a date for a meeting. Excited and spruced up, Patrick and his older brother, Michael, went to the appointed place, a suite at New York's Drake Hotel, at the appointed time. A telegram came from their father's secretary. The meeting was off. He was ill. Both boys were to go to sea scout camp in North Carolina for six weeks.

A longtime smoker, their father took to a dehumidified suite at Sapelo Island, his 44,000-acre estate off the Georgia coast. He spent his time in bed or in a chair. Months later the boys finally got to see him. They found a frail man lying on his back, sandbags on his chest to exercise his diaphragm, smoking cigarettes. They talked warmly, but as Patrick recalled, "My memories are of a man always short of breath, counting the time he had left to live." Patrick saw his father only a dozen more times in the next six years. Each time he was sicker. He died in Switzerland on Dec. 16, 1964. He was 58. Patrick was 15.

Though the value of the estate was estimated at $25 million, R.J. Reynolds Jr. left nothing to his six sons by his first three marriages. His fortune went to his fourth wife of three years and to a daughter, his first, born 36 hours after his death. "Father wanted to teach us to work," Patrick said gamely. What pained Patrick more was the separation, first by his father's messy divorce, when Patrick was 3, and later by his father's premature death.

Six years ago, when he gave up smoking, Patrick also sold off $2.5 million in R.J. Reynolds stock that he inherited from his grandmother, his entire holdings in the family company that by then was run by outsiders. Two years ago he was handed an opportunity to strike a harder blow. A chance meeting with U.S. Sen. Bob Packwood (R., Ore.), during which Reynolds argued for higher cigarette taxes, led to an invitation to testify in July, 1986, before a Senate committee contemplating a complete ban on cigarette advertising.

Using statistics supplied by the American Lung Association, Reynolds, with his boyish looks and actorly delivery, was a hit. That led to invitations to speak before the American Council on Science and Health, the National Foundation for Cancer Research, Americans for Non-Smokers Rights and members of the New York, California and South Carolina legislatures.

"The more I learned about the industry, the angrier I became," Reynolds told one group. "They spend $2 billion a year on advertising; that's $8 per head for every man, woman and child in the country." He told another group that cigarette "advertising is aimed at young people. As older smokers die off or get hip and quit, the industry has to snag teenagers to take their places."

Elsewhere, Reynolds complained that cigarette "ads always depict healthy, wealthy romantic types. They suggest manhood and vitality, womanhood and independence. Of course, the tobacco industry maintains that its advertising is protected by the 1st Amendment. My reply is that cigarette advertising is the greatest single abuse of the privilege of free speech."

An energetic speaker, Reynolds had no problem booking appearances. He did, however, need to make a living. Last year a seat mate on an airplane flight proposed an idea. Six months ago Reynolds took it up. Divorced after a brief marriage, he left his 2-acre estate in the Los Angeles suburb of Holmby Hills, moved into a one-bedroom suite in a Gold Coast residential hotel and invested the remains of the inheritance from his grandmother in a company that goes against the family grain, or more accurately, the family leaf.

Reynolds' partner is Bunn Goodwin, a Chicago-based producer of "personal development" audio tapes. Their first project: the seven-day "Reynolds Stop Smoking Program" (available by phone from 1-800-445-4444). Two 60-minute audio cassettes, they feature Reynolds and psychologist Wayne Dyer, author of such books as "Your Erroneous Zones" and "Pulling Your Own Strings."

As a former smoker, Reynolds has much to suggest. "Treat yourself lovingly, and negative addictions will be eliminated from your life," he notes on tape. Also useful are deep breathing, supportive friends, lots of water and such vitamins as beta carotene. "We find," he added off-tape, "that most people who want to quit smoking are motivated by two factors. They worry about their health and about their jobs. Employers no longer are willing to put up with higher insurance rates and lost productivity caused by smoking."

In recent months, in forums as far apart as Los Angeles and Toronto, Reynolds has pushed for higher cigarette taxes, bans on all cigarette advertising, prohibition of cigarette use on airplanes and enactment of local clean-air ordinances.

He has support, he says, from his wing of the Reynolds family: his brother and two of his three surviving half-brothers. (The fourth died in a light-plane crash.) Others, among them cousins working for the Reynolds company, are, he admits, less enthusiastic, "but I haven't seen them for years."

Should those members of the Reynolds family have reservations about being in the tobacco business? "I don't want to be Mr. Moralizer," Reynolds said. But he noted that worldwide smoking levels have increased 73 percent since 1968, with much of the increase in Third World countries where American cigarettes often appear without health warnings. "That calls into question their ethics," he said.

These days Reynolds has no shortage of opportunities to talk of the hazards of smoking. Shortly after he talked with a reporter Monday, a new report, from the surgeon general, said that nicotine, a drug as "addictive as cocaine or heroin," is contributing to the deaths of more than 300,000 Americans each year. A few hours later, to discuss that development, Reynolds was due to receive a camera crew from WBBM-Ch. 2. In case any members of the crew wondered, his office sported a sign: "It's okay to smoke. Just don't exhale."

CAPTION:

PHOTO: Antismoking crusader Patrick Reynolds, with the message he promotes. Tribune photo by Bill Hogan.

PHOTOS: Patrick's memory of his father, R.J. Reynolds Jr. (left), was as a sickly man. R.J. Reynolds (right) founded the tobacco giant.

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NEWS

No smoking;Tobacco heir's crusade

Steve Marshall
342 words
19 May 1988
USA Today
FINAL
02A

Patrick Reynolds' nerve center in his continuing war against smoking is the top story of a brownstone, just off Chicago's Magnificent Mile.

Trudge up four flights of steps and a ``No Smoking'' sign greets you.

Reynolds, 39, mortified relatives - the Reynolds tobacco family - when he began stumping against smoking in 1986.

But now, as he puts it, ``I'm putting my money where my mouth is'' -by investing heavily in the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program.

He founded Reynolds-Goodwin Corp. with marketing executive Bunn Goodwin.

Their $19.88 behavior modification program guarantees to help smokers kick the habit in a week - or their money back.

This week, Reynolds, 39, is on a swing through the Pacific Northwest, promoting his product and urging schoolchildren not to smoke.

Reynolds, who smoked a pack a day from 1968 until 1984, knows how hard it is to stop. ``I tried every program in the book. ... -I really did struggle.'' Finally, he did it on his own, using behavior modification.

Reynolds, who appeared in a sci-fi epic, The Eliminators, has put his acting career on hold.

For now, he'll continue to campaign for tougher clean-air laws.

His Beverly Hills home, where he's lived for 20 years, is on the market; and his book about his family, The Gilded Leaf, is due out next year.

``Patrick's my little brother and I love him, but I disagree with him on this thing'' says Mike Reynolds, 40, of Winston-Salem, N.C., a pack-a-day puffer.

Patrick Reynolds, who has won praise from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, is delighted at Koop's latest anti-tobacco report, which says cigarettes are addicting.

``Print this,'' he says, slamming hands on desk for emphasis. ``I'd like a cigarette right now. I know if I have just one I'm in danger of going back.''

CUTLINE:REYNOLDS: He's promoting program to help smokers kick the habit.

PHOTO;b/w,Brent Jones(FP,Patrick Reynolds,F1)

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STYLE
The Magazine Reader

Puff From Philip Morris

Charles Trueheart
Washington Post Staff Writer
960 words
31 May 1988
The Washington Post
FINAL
c07

You have to hand it to Philip Morris. For three years now, the cigarette company (now a conglomerate whose tobacco business accounts for only half its revenues) has been publishing a glossy magazine called Philip Morris. Subtitle: The Best of America.

At first glance you'd think this was a Chamber of Commerce or airline publication, it's so cheerful and plain-spoken and gosh-darn inoffensive. The spring issue treats the fading-but-fiercely-independent way of life of Chesapeake Bay watermen; a celebration of that grand and evolving native tradition, quilting; and Gerald Ford repeating his accidental-statesman rap. The magazine's editor is Frank Gannon, a former speech writer for President Ford and an accomplished humorist in his own right.

Indeed, you begin to suspect a lively wit at work as you look more closely at this magazine. All-American scenes at a tobacco auction, of course. A feature on cigarette girls at the Rainbow Room. Entrepreneur Kay Cohlmia, who's launching an airline for smokers only. Sidney Zion, ghoster of the new Roy Cohn "autobiography," offering a futuristic "Fable of the New Prohibition," all about celebrities dodging the federal Smoke Enforcement Agency. And how a vegetarian reconciles his dietary and smoking habits. Truly. The magazine's editorial brainstorming sessions must be scenes of high hilarity.

There's also endless news from around the nation about "anti-smoking zealots" and smokers' rights. The issue is never health, it's always choice, or freedom from government intrusion. The letters column is full of straight-faced testimonials. "I am 62 years old, and I have smoked since I was 18 years old." "Many doctors smoke and enjoy it." And so on. One pictures Philip Morris readers sitting in their armchairs, waggling their heads in disbelief at what is being done to their way of life.

The magazine is free, as well it should be, so long as you're 21 years of age. Write Philip Morris Magazine, P.O. Box C-32081, Richmond, Va. 23286-0733.

Southern magazine, incidentally, has a story in its June issue about Patrick Reynolds, the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. heir. As you may have heard, the sometime B-movie actor and reformed playboy has made it his life's work to fight the smoking scourge that provided him with his considerable inheritance. But Pat Jordan's straightforward profile paints Reynolds as a tightly wound sort of fellow, his motives for embracing the cause not entirely clear, perhaps even to himself. It seems he wants to write a television docudrama about a powerful tobacco family and this recalcitrant heir ...

The Unpleasantness at Boone U.

If the editors of Texas Monthly ever have wondered that their state might run out of amazing stories, tales like Emily Yoffe's in the June issue must be powerfully reassuring. "Boone Pickens and the Roach Motel" is even good enough to overcome the bone weariness most people experience from overexposure to the folksy Texas billionaire.

A few years ago Pickens set out to remake West Texas State University, the cow college in his home city of Amarillo, into an intellectual oasis of the Panhandle. Fair enough. He had the money to make it happen. But the self-aggrandizing "strategic planner" the university hired as president in 1984, Ed Roach, turned out to be a disaster-spending a million-plus on a prairie palace for himself (the "motel" of the title), offing unpopular academic departments with a stroke of the pen and terminating nontenured opponents.

As Yoffe writes, "The faculty"-with whom her sympathies openly lie-"began to think of WTSU as the French court under Louis XIV-a world populated by snitches and fueled by vindictiveness and internal intrigue." Pickens, when he is not fulminating against conspiracies to undo him, is clearly exasperated by what's going on. The oil-business titan looks out the window of his downtown office in Amarillo and says: "Look, that's the main street. What do you see out there? Five cars! ... The only reason I stay sane is that I'm out of town a lot. ... You hang around here for a while. We'll get you as screwy as we are."

The Next Pill

"RU 486 is a revolution," declares a reproductive health worker in developing countries. "I can't wait until we get our hands on this stuff." On the other hand, a leader of the National Right to Life Committee says the drug is "chemical warfare on the unborn."

What they're arguing about in the June Mother Jones is the so-called abortion pill, developed by the French pharmaceutical company Roussel-Uclaf, which terminates pregnancies reliably up to three weeks after a missed menstrual period. Writer Laura Fraser makes the case for it bluntly: "For a woman whose period is late, using RU 486 means no waiting, no walking past picket lines at abortion clinics, and no feet up in stirrups for surgery. It also means she will never have to know whether she had actually been pregnant."

This last seems to have antiabortion forces sweating the possibility that RU 486 would cost them "some of our best arguments." Although women in five foreign countries (France, China, Britain, the Netherlands, Sweden) will be permitted to begin using the drug this year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration still has much testing to perform.

For now, Fraser reports, RU 486 has drawn the uncharacteristically unified "tentative support" of both feminist health activists and old-line family planning organizations (Planned Parenthood, the World Health Organization). A well-organized public clamor, she concludes, "could outweigh a pharmaceutical company's concerns over a right wing boycott."

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PEOPLE

Tobacco Heir Puts Out His Family Legacy

MICHAEL ROBERTSON, CHRONICLE STAFF WRITER
762 words
23 June 1988
The San Francisco Chronicle
FINAL
B3

.

Anti-smoking crusader Patrick Reynolds is a lucky man. His enemies are wicked, and his family is strange.

For the last two years, Reynolds' enemies have been the manufacturers of American tobacco products and the politicians who defend them, a clan of apologists nearly capable of finding a bright side to crib death.

But it was not just the carnage inflicted by smoking that moved Reynolds. When it comes to cigarets, he feels a particular responsibility.

His grandfather was R.J. Reynolds, the North Carolina tobacco tycoon. His father was R.J. Reynolds Jr., the tobacco heir and sometime playboy who first ignored and then disinherited his youngest son - as he did all his children except his then-unborn daughter. (By the way, Reynolds says, "My mother had an affair with Porfirio Rubirosa.")

A guy could write a book about a family like this.

A guy did. Reynolds' three-generational saga, "The Gilded Leaf," will be published next spring by Little-Brown.

It is only fair to add that Reynolds, 39, is a good-looking former actor who knows how to offer his cheekbones to the camera. His last big role was as Mandroid in "The Eliminators" in 1985, available at many video stores. He says he has given up his acting career for the time being.

In short, he is a do-gooder who seems too good to be true. His cause is just, but he seems so perfectly suited to profiting from his high-mindedness, in contrast to someone like Ralph Nader, whose hopeless nerdiness seemed to guarantee the purity of his crusade.

Reynolds, who smoked for 10 years until 1984, is on a national tour, lashing out against the untruths and veiled actions of Big Tobacco - and simultaneously hyping "The Reynolds Stop Smoking Program," a self-development cassette course developed by popular psychologist Dr. Wayne Dyer, who wrote "Your Erroneous Zones." The price is $125. Vitamin supplements are included.

Reynolds says he's no canny self-promoter. He says he hates cigarets because his father died of emphysema. (A half-brother - who owns tobacco stock - insists the father died of pneumonia.)

It's not money he's after. An inheritance from his grandmother allows him to live comfortably. In fact, he says, he's put his fortune at risk by investing in his stop-smoking program, though, if it prospers, so will he.

His public involvement in the fight against tobacco began two years ago in Washington, D.C. His question in a public meeting about low cigaret taxes attracted the attention of Senator Robert Packwood, R-Ore., who asked him to testify before Con gress, a step he took only when he realized his name would attract attention.

Now, he says, "My voice can speak to millions of people. I can make a difference with my life. No matter what I am accused of, I will keep doing this. I think you can tell a lot about people - whether they are cynical or still have their innocence - in their attitudes toward me."

Having chastised his sneering critics, he recites his litany of worldwide tobacco scandal:

-- Cigarets are the most heavily advertised product in the United States, representing an annual ad investment of $8 for every man, woman and child in this country.

-- Tobacco use is rising 9 percent a year in China, as American companies try to exploit foreign markets to compensate for the decline of smoking in America.

-- Two-thirds of Californians would like cigaret taxes raised but the legislature won't do it, probably because two-thirds of California's legislators get contributions, directly or indirectly, from the tobacco industry.

-- A ban on cigaret advertising would not violate the First Amendment because tobacco is the only product that causes death if used in exactly the way the product is intended to be used.

There is more, so very much more.

Reynolds says the tobacco companies are trying to rewrite history by claiming the recent judgment against the Liggett Group for contributing to the death of smoker Rose Cipollone was actually a victory because it was "only" $400,000.

If you think that a relative died from heart disease, cancer or lung disease with smoking as a contributing cause, Reynolds says you should write to the Tobacco Products Liability Project at the Northeastern School of Law in Boston.

Then, he advises, sue the pants off the tobacco companies.

He sold his tobacco stock in 1979.

PHOTO; Caption: PATRICK REYNOLDS / He sells stop-smoking program

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Reynolds Heir Blows Smoke in Tobacco Industry's Eyes

By Alf Siewers
944 words
4 October 1988
Christian Science Monitor
Pg. 1
v80, n217, Section 1

Copyright The Christian Science Publishing Society 1988

Chicago, IL, US --

PATRICK REYNOLDS is the ultimate tobacco-industry diversification.

This grandson of tobacco king R. J. Reynolds has beaten his cigarettes into audiocassettes so people will learn smoking no more.

Mr. Reynolds sold his tobacco stock several years ago and now promotes tapes that aim to help people stop smoking.

That's a little like the scion of a New England slave-trading family taking up abolitionism, or a bootlegger's boy taking the pledge.

Reynolds likens American tobacco-company efforts to market cigarettes abroad, while smoking in the United States declines, to "a new opium trade."

"It's a product as addictive as heroin," he said, spearing some pasta for emphasis at lunch here. "We have one set of standards for our own citizens, and another set of standards for foreign peoples."

Such sharp comments, coupled with his family name and a photogenic presence honed by his acting career, give Reynolds unique stature as drum major for the anti-smoking movement.

And he's riding high in a year that has seen a report from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop that found cigarettes can be addictive and a historic jury decision in New Jersey that found a cigarette company partly responsible for a woman's death.

A wave of hundreds of local smoking ordinances continues to swell across the US, including a recent one in Chicago where typically combative aldermen were photographed defiantly lighting up in the City Council chamber.

Oregon voters will rule on a strengthened indoor pollution measure in November, while a California referendum will seek to raise cigarette taxes, with some of the proceeds going to medical research.

Meanwhile, antismoking advocates hope that they will have the votes in Congress next year to pass the Luken bill and follow Canada's lead by banning the promotion and advertising of cigarettes. The bill would also ban vending-machine cigarette sales and includes other measures as well.

Now Reynolds can taste the "ultimate" goal that he says has kept him living in the present rather than feeling guilt for the damage wreaked by the cigarettes on which his fortune was built.

That goal is a "smoke free" society.

"It's getting closer," he says.

And it will be prohibition by the black door when it comes.

A ban on cigarette ads and restrictions on cigarette exports are just two of Reynolds's pet proposals for Congress as he buzzes around the US speaking on topics such as the "smokeless cigarette," a new R.J. Reynolds tobacco company product that he says is as addictive as regular cigarettes. He also backs higher cigarette taxes and a ban with strict penalties for selling cigarettes to those under 21.

Reynolds also has a book coming out appropriately entitled "The Gilded Leaf," which profiles his family, the founders of the R.J. Reynolds Company, which bought Nabisco and changed its name to RJR Nabisco Inc. in 1985.

The move illustrates to some industry analysts how profitable tobacco companies are trying to diversify in the face of negative attitudes toward their product in the US.

Reynolds, who reportedly inherited about $2.5 million before selling his stock and hitting the lecture circuit, says he is following an industry trend to an extreme. "At this point, fully two-thirds of R.J. Reynolds's gross sales is coming from nontobacco related products," he says.

Unlike his own ventures, however, "Fully half of the profits come from cigarettes -- this gives you an idea of how profitable cigarettes are."

A star of the little-remembered 1986 science-fiction flick "Eliminators," Reynolds brings a laid-back, New Age moral tone to a debate that at the public policy level is often couched exclusively in health terms.

That approach is rooted in his own experience. He tells of an emotional reunion with his father, who was incapacitated by a smoking-related illness, and of his own struggle to stop smoking afterward.

"I, a young man who saw my father dying from cigarettes, nevertheless took up smoking at the age of 18. It really proves to me that the lure of cigarettes to teenagers is very powerful indeed," he says. "It took me 15 years then to successfully stop smoking." He feels smoking impinges on a person's sense of self- worth. An upcoming set of stop-smoking tapes that he is promoting, which includes a video appearance by him, stresses self-motivation, as did an earlier set of tapes that sold over 30,000 copies.

Gary Miller of the Tobacco Institute, like RJR Nabisco, won't comment on Reynolds's activities, but he disputes the idea that tobacco is addictive.

Reynolds disagrees. He says his own battle with cigarettes ended when he became alert to the moods that made him crave one. Two years later, in 1986, he testified in Congress on the need for a ban on cigarette advertising.

Since then, he has become either a media terror or an unscientific nuisance (depending on which side you're on) to tobacco companies, studying their advertising methods to use against them.

"They refuse to appear on talk shows with me," he says, recalling one exception on a television show where a tobacco spokesman said that countries that banned cigarette advertising showed no substantial decline in the rate of smoking

"I replied that if there was really no substantial decline in the rate of smoking without advertising, why do the tobacco companies want to spend $2 [billion] to $3 billion a year in the US promoting a product that's killing people?" Reynolds recalls with a grin.

Illustration: photograph

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1; Metro Desk

Reynolds Scion Taking Role in Prop. 99's Anti-Tobacco Drive

MARK A. STEIN
Times Staff Writer
914 words
27 October 1988
Los Angeles Times
Home
3

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1988 All Rights Reserved)

Scrambling to keep a lead in the opinion polls, sponsors of Proposition 99, the tobacco tax initiative, are covering the state with low-cost, high-profile events, including a public endorsement by the grandson of tobacco pioneer R. J. Reynolds.

Anti-smoking activist Patrick Reynolds' Yes on 99 plea highlights a week of unusually vibrant campaigning by supporters of the 25-cents-a-pack increase-a week in which debates, a "health run" and a Halloween skit for children also are being used to counter TV ads eating away at the proposition's popularity.

Meanwhile, tobacco interests are going beyond their negative ads and are trying to directly rebut the medical community's campaign. For example, it mocked the anti-smoking skit by giving out bags of candy that said, "The real trick is the multimillion-dollar treat doctors have written for themselves."

Despite the new campaign vigor, campaign themes for both sides are the same.

Doctors say the first tobacco-tax boost in 21 years would discourage smoking and raise money for indigent health care and tobacco-related disease research. Tobacco interests contend that the increase would be unfair to smokers, a burden on the poor and a windfall for wealthy doctors who are paid to treat the poor.

Proposition 99 would increase California's state tobacco tax, now among the nation's lowest, to 35 cents a pack and then use the money to help provide health care for uninsured indigents, fund anti-smoking education programs, finance research into tobacco-related diseases and improve public parks.

The proposal was supported by 72% of those queried by the California Poll in July, but last week the poll found support had dipped to 51%, with 30% opposed and 19% undecided. The Los Angeles Times Poll released Wednesday found that 58% of voters support the measure, 36% oppose it and 6% are undecided.

Controversial Ads

Tobacco interests have sought to whittle down support for the proposal with a series of controversial TV ads alleging that the measure would increase crime and enrich doctors. The medical community denies the charges, but it has less than one-tenth of the tobacco industry's $10-million advertising budget, so doctors have turned to grass-roots campaigning instead.

Pro-99 events this week range from a debate Monday in San Diego to a caravan down Highway 99 in the Central Valley on Tuesday and Wednesday to a "Walk-and-Fun Run" on Sunday in Long Beach. Today's schedule includes debates in Orange and San Mateo counties and press conferences at both ends of the state announcing Reynolds' endorsement.

Important Symbol

Reynolds, 39, of Beverly Hills has become a powerful symbol to anti-smoking forces since he first stepped forward in 1986 to support a proposed ban of all tobacco advertising. Congress ultimately rejected the idea, but the experience persuaded Reynolds, an ex-smoker himself, to leave acting and instead campaign against smoking, as well as writing a book about his wealthy and well-known family.

"I thought people would listen to me, but I didn't expect to be on Dan Rather that night," Reynolds recalled. "I realized in the ensuing weeks and months that I could have an impact."

His distaste for smoking is not difficult to understand, he said. His first memory of his father, R. J. Reynolds Jr., is of him lying down with sandbags on his chest to exercise his impaired lungs.

Lung Disease

"My father (a lifelong heavy smoker) died of emphysema caused by the very product that made our family fortune," he said. "I didn't know my father all that well, because he died when I was still a boy. To learn more about him, I began researching the family and the company."

And, he added, the way in which the company made its money.

"The more I learned, the more concerned I became," he said, adding that he believes the ad campaign against Proposition 99 typifies the industry's use of misinformation.

"Out of one side of their mouths, they say, `Oh, this will hurt low-income people,' but at the same time, they have been raising their prices 300% (since the last tax increase in 1967)," he said.

Support for Doctors

He also criticized the tobacco industry's implication that doctors support the measure chiefly to benefit themselves.

"Doctors don't get rich treating the poor," he contended.

In any case, after researching his family, Reynolds resolved not only to quit smoking, but also to sell the company stock he inherited. He said he did not own a single share of stock in what is now RJR Nabisco Inc. between 1979 and 1986, when a brother teasingly bought him two shares as a Christmas present.

Reynolds said he will donate both those shares to the Yes on 99 campaign at the press conference scheduled for today.

Officials at the tobacco industry-financed campaign opposing the initiative were unimpressed with the symbolism.

"The guy has spent his whole life doing this (working against smoking)," No on 99 spokesman Jeff Raimundo said. "We probably don't even have a comment, except to note he has not turned back any of the money (from his inheritance)."

Reynolds shrugs off such criticism.

"I've really been able to make a difference with my life in this arena," he said, "and it feels great."

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R. J. Reynolds' Grandson Aligns With California Company to Laun ch National Ad Campaign Against Tobacco Industry

By Matt McDowell
600 words
15 November 1988
Business Wire
Pg. 1

Copyright Business Wire 1988

Pleasanton, CA, US --

After more than two years of combatting the tobacco industry through lectures, public appearances and congressional testimony, Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R. J. Reynolds, has decided to take his hard-hitting anti-smoking crusade to the smoking public.

The announcement that Reynolds has teamed up with Pleasanton- based SyberVision Systems to convince the estimated 50 million Americans who smoke to kick the habit came just two days before the Nov. 17 Great American Smokeout, a national quit smoking day established by a coalition of the American Cancer Society, the American Heart Association and the American Lung Association.

To educate the general public about the truths behind nicotine, the Reynolds crusade will utilize advertising - the very same medium the tobacco industry has used to hook American consumers on cigarettes.

The Reynolds/SyberVision campaign will feature Reynolds in a 30- minute informational television program which reveals many shocking truths about the tobacco industry.

The program also offers a unique breakthrough solution to the how-to-quit-smoking dilemma faced by millions of Americans every day. The program is scheduled to air beginning in December in more than 200 U.S. markets at a frequency of up to 600 times per week.

"In using approximately 300 hours a week of national television to spread our message, we are declaring war against the cigarette manufacturers themselves whose ads for years have deceptively associated smoking with romance, success, sports and friendship," said Reynolds.

"Through my alignment with SyberVision, we will make millions of people aware of the real facts about tobacco industry tactics and also offer a proven method for getting unhooked from their products."

The stop smoking solution presented by Reynolds and SyberVision is in the form of a unique audio cassette system called The Neuropsychology Of Smoking Cessation -- How To Quit Smoking For Life.

This system was developed through the resarch of Dr. Tom Ferguson, a graduate of the Yale University School of Medicine and one of the nation's foremost experts on smoking cessation and Dr. Karl Pribam, head of the Stanford University Neuropsychology Laboratory.

"When my grandfather R.J. Reynolds began marketing cigarettes he didn't know they would cause millions of deaths. Now, the evidence that smoking kills is everywhere. As a former smoker, I know how difficult it is to quit. Helping others quit is the focus of my life. I care more about smokers than any other group," stated Reynolds.

"Together with a team of researchers I have conducted a two year search for the state of the art in quitting smoking. How To Quit Smoking For Life" is, according to Reynolds, "the most logical and comprehensive approach I've found to breaking the nicotine habit.

"I'm genuinely enthusiastic about it. It's the best program yet. This system gives the smoker the knowledge and the tools needed to develop the deep-seated core belief that he can quit. Most stop smoking programs ignore this vital preliminary step."

Reynolds will be donating a portion of his revenue from the sales of this program to the sponsors of the Great American Smokeout and the rest will go to financing his on-going crusade.

Reynolds, who first spoke out against the tobacco industry in July 1986 at a Congressional hearing in favor of a complete ban of cigarette advertising, is determined not to end his crusade until America becomes a smoke-free society, a dream he hopes will come true by the year 2000.

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Millions Try To Kick the Habit for Great American Smokeout

LARRY RYCKMAN
920 words
17 November 1988
The Associated Press

(Copyright 1988. The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

Millions of smokers on Thursday swapped their cigarettes for apples and gum, went cold turkey for free turkey sandwiches and tossed their tobacco into bonfires as part of the 12th annual Great American Smokeout.

Newborns in several hospitals wore "I'm a Born Non-Smoker" city workers in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, sported pins and stickers that said, "Kiss Me, I Don't Smoke; and non-smokers joined "adopt-a-smoker" programs to help smokers through a smokeless day.

The American Cancer Society estimates nearly 40 percent of the nation's 50 million smokers tried to quit for the day. About one-tenth, or 2 million people, will kick the habit permanently, said Paul Rosenberg, a cancer society spokesman in New York.

"My grandkids keep telling me it's time to quit smoking," said Pat Zielke, mayor of La Crosse, Wis., and a pack-a-day smoker for 40 years. He quit smoking for the day and was "adopted" by a cancer society volunteer.

Actor and former smoker Larry Hagman, star of the television show "Dallas," said the smokeout was the day to just quit lighting up.

"The key to quitting for good is just quitting. There's no tapering off, you just have to go cold-turkey," said Hagman, who is honorary chairman of the observance.

In New York, the cast and crew of Off-Broadway's "Steel Magnolias" went cold turkey.

"It's going to curl some of their hair," teased non-smoker Bobby Grayson, hair designer for the play, which is set in a beauty parlor.

Smokers traded their cigarettes for apples in several cities, including New York, Norwalk, Conn., and Philadelphia. Non-smokers got apples, too, along with a "good for you."

Some hard-core New Yorkers eyed the apples suspiciously. Others took them to wives, boyfriend or co-workers who smoke. Some, like Sino Perratore, threw their cigarettes into a waste basket at Rockefeller Plaza.

In Hammond, La., pharmacist Don Fellows Jr. burned four cartons of cigarettes, four boxes of cigars and several boxes of chewing tobacco in a hibachi outside his store.

The burning tobacco was all he had left after deciding several months ago to stop ordering the products and to burn what was left.

"I thought I would make a statement; maybe someone would stop and think and stop smoking cigarettes before it was too late," Fellows said.

A chain of three pharmacies planned a similar tobacco bonfire in Austin, Texas.

In Indianapolis and Fort Wayne, Ind., 10-feet-tall cigarettes were erected downtown, complete with smoke-generating machines. Fire crews doused the smoldering cigarettes and chopped them into small pieces.

In Little Rock, Ark., a 5-foot-tall smoking cigarette was put out with fire extinguishers by workers at the Baptist Medical System building. One employee, Lana Campbell, said this is about the third time she's used the smokeout to try to quit.

"You know what they say, if at first you don't succeed," said Ms. Campbell, 27, of North Little Rock.

The grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds joined with Pleasanton, Calif.-based publisher SyberVision to launch a $20 million television advertising campaign accusing the tobacco industry of addicting millions of Americans.

"My grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, helped get America hooked on cigarettes through clever advertising. Now, I'm going to use the power of advertising to get America unhooked," Patrick Reynolds said.

Thousands of Californians rode aboard the "Smokeout Express," a train coach on Amtrak's San Diegan, which took a whistlestop no-smoking journey through Southern California. A pipeless Mr. Potato Head, the popular toy spud, joined them.

One California crusader against smoking tried to stuff 143 cigarettes in his mouth at one time to show that smoking is ugly and hazardous to your health.

"I'm showing how ridiculous it looks. Some people smoke this much in a day or week," said Jim Mouth as he prepared to shove the more than seven packs in his mouth at John's Pipe Shop in Hollywood.

Businesses and schools in Concord and Bedford, Mass., received visits from a 6-foot-tall turkey clad in winter garb.

"Our turkey is wearing a scarf and a vest and encouraging people to quit cold turkey," said Deb Beatty, a cancer society spokeswoman.

They were also talking turkey near the Texas Capitol in Austin, where a sandwich shop gave free 6-inch turkey sandwiches to people who turned in a half-pack of cigarettes.

The anti-smoking demonstrations persauded many to try to kick the habit. Others finally heeded the warnings that smoking causes lung cancer, heart disease and respiratory disease. The surgeon general has warned of the potentially fatal risks of smoking and the addictive properties of nicotine, the drug in cigarettes.

Eileen Ham, a smoker for 35 years, got the message.

"I've been cutting down slowly. I've gone a whole day without smoking in the last two weeks, and I've cut down to five or six cigarettes a night," she said in Austin. "I want to quit because it will make me feel better and it will give me more energy."

Still, there's one in every crowd.

Alan Farnham, a reporter for Fortune magazine in New York, gathered 40 "like-minded people" for a tongue-in-cheek "smoke-in" at a Manhattan restaurant.

"By reducing stress, tobacco adds years to life," Farnham said. "Galen, the Greek physician, believed tobacco adds years to life."

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A

For one day, habits go up in Smokeout

Associated Press
440 words
18 November 1988
Houston Chronicle
2 STAR
15

Millions of smokers Thursday swapped their cigarettes for apples and tossed their tobacco into bonfires as part of the 12th annual Great American Smokeout.

Newborns in several hospitals wore ``I'm a Born Non-Smoker'' T-shirts, city workers in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, sported pins and stickers that said, ``Kiss Me, I Don't Smoke,'' and non-smokers joined ``adopt-a-smoker'' programs to help smokers through a smokeless day.

The American Cancer Society estimates nearly 40 percent of the nation's 50 million smokers tried to quit for the day. About 2 million will kick the habit permanently, said Paul Rosenberg, a cancer society spokesman in New York.

``My grandkids keep telling me it's time to quit smoking,'' said Pat Zielke, mayor of La Crosse, Wis., and a pack-a-day smoker for 40 years. He quit for the day.

Smokers traded their cigarettes for apples in several cities, including New York, Norwalk, Conn., and Philadelphia. Non-smokers got apples, too, along with a ``good for you.''

In Hammond, La., pharmacist Don Fellows Jr. burned four cartons of cigarettes, four boxes of cigars and several boxes of chewing tobacco in a hibachi outside his store.

The burning tobacco was all he had left after deciding several months ago to stop ordering the products and to burn what was left.

``I thought I would make a statement; maybe someone would stop and think and stop smoking cigarettes before it was too late,'' Fellows said.

A chain of three pharmacies planned a similar bonfire in Austin.

In Indianapolis and Fort Wayne, Ind., 10-feet-tall cigarettes were erected downtown, complete with smoke-generating machines. Fire crews doused the smoldering cigarettes and chopped them to pieces.

The grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds joined with Pleasanton, Calif.-based publisher SyberVision to launch a $20 million television advertising campaign accusing the tobacco industry of addicting millions of Americans.

``My grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, helped get America hooked on cigarettes through clever advertising. Now, I'm going to use the power of advertising to get America unhooked,'' Patrick Reynolds said.

The surgeon general has warned of the potentially fatal risks of smoking and the addictive properties of nicotine, the drug in cigarettes.

Alan Farnham, a reporter for Fortune magazine in New York, gathered 40 ``like-minded people'' for a tongue-in-cheek ``smoke-in'' at a Manhattan restaurant.

``By reducing stress, tobacco adds years to life,'' Farnham said. ``Galen, the Greek physician, believed tobacco adds years to life.''

Photo: Veronica Flynn during the Great American Smoke Out; Credit: John Everett/Chronicle

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NATIONAL

Florida 5th in U.S. in smoking death rate

ROBERT BYRD
Associated Press
774 words
18 November 1988
St. Petersburg Times
CITY
1A

ATLANTA - On the day of the Great American Smokeout, a government report released Thursday shows Kentucky with the nation's highest smoking-related death rate, and Florida in the top five.

Kentucky reported 176 smoking-related deaths for every 100,000 residents in 1985, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported. At the other end of the scale was Utah, with just 45 smoking-related deaths for every 100,000 people over the course of the year.

Nationwide, smoking killed 314,574 Americans that year.

The worst states, after Kentucky, were West Virginia, with 172 smoking-related deaths per 100,000 people in 1985; Arkansas, 164; Rhode Island, 164; and Florida, 161.

Best on the list, after Utah, were: Alaska, 54; Hawaii, 77; New Mexico, 85; and Colorado, 94.

The report is based on computer analysis of statistics from 1985, the latest CDC analysis available. And while the state-by-state totals are not age-adjusted - to compensate for areas with more older or younger people - the rates provide valid ``ballpark comparisons,`` said Dr. Thomas Novotny, a specialist in the CDC's Office of Smoking and Health.

For instance, it stands to reason that Utah, with its large Mormon population, would have a lower rate of death from smoking, he said. The Mormon Church discourages smoking.

The CDC estimates the number and rate of smoking deaths through a mathematical formula, counting deaths from diseases that can be caused by smoking - lung cancer, for instance - and factoring in the prevalence of smoking in a particular state.

While there might be cases not easily explained - a chain-smoking Kentucky coal miner, for example - ``the tobacco-related illnesses far outweigh the risk of other exposures,`` Novotny said. He added that the number of smokers in any particular state greatly exceeds the number of people who might work in a given cancer-risk occupation.

``Smoking goes across all sorts of lines, men and women,`` he said. ``These other things are not something that we think will complicate the calculations enough to make them invalid.``

``Even as smoking prevalence declines in this country,`` the CDC said, ``smoking-attributable illness will continue to produce an enormous disease burden well into the 21st century.``

About 27 percent of the nation's adults are smokers, according to the latest national estimate. Four decades ago, the percentage was 41 percent.

``We still have a lot of work to do to prevent people from dying from smoking-related illnesses,`` Novotny said. ``It's still a big issue.``

Federal researchers hope the new state-by-state findings will help health professionals at the state level get a better idea of their specific problems and goals, Novotny said.

Smoking causes lung cancer, heart disease and respiratory disease. The surgeon general has warned of both the potentially fatal risks of smoking and the addictive properties of nicotine, the drug in cigarettes.

The CDC report said that 67 percent of the smoking-related deaths in the United States were among men; 32 percent among women and less than 1 percent were among children younger than 5.

Most smoking deaths, Novotny said, occur at a relatively advanced age - older than 65. ``Chronic lung disease goes on for a long time,`` he said. ``You may be alive for 20 years with it, but that doesn't mean you're not sick.``

The prevalence of smoking ``is definitely going down everywhere,`` Novotny said. However, he added that ``it is declining less rapidly in women.`` More women than men are expected to be smoking ``sometime in the 1990s,`` he said.

Thursday was the 12th year for the Great American Smokeout, the American Cancer Society's annual attempt to persuade smokers to give up the habit, even if just for one day.

The society estimates that nearly 40 percent of the nation's 50-million smokers tried to quit for the day, many of them by swapping cigarettes for apples and gum. About one-tenth, or 2-million people, will kick the habit permanently, said Paul Rosenberg, a cancer society spokesman in New York.

The would-be quitters got encouragement from the grandson of tobacco magnate R. J. Reynolds. Patrick Reynolds joined with Pleasanton, Calif.-based publisher SyberVision to launch a $20-million television advertising campaign accusing the tobacco industry of addicting millions of Americans.

``My grandfather, R. J. Reynolds, helped get America hooked on cigarettes through clever advertising. Now, I'm going to use the power of advertising to get America unhooked,`` Patrick Reynolds said. - Information from the Los Angeles Times was used in this report.

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NEWS

Great American Smokeout / Millions Try to Stop Puffing for a Day

Perry Lang, Chronicle Staff Writer
830 words
18 November 1988
The San Francisco Chronicle
FINAL
A3

.

Maria Pardes, 21, quit smoking about a year ago.

Yesterday, in the classic manner of the recently converted, he was trying to get his sister to quit.

"It's a disgusting, smelly habit," said Pardes, as he stood outside a BART station in the Mission District of San Francisco collecting anti-smoking literature in Spanish for his sister to read.

The Mission District streetcorner nonsmoking campaign was one of thousands throughout the nation as part of the 12th annual Great American Smokeout, aimed at getting smokers to kick the habit for at least one day.

The American Cancer Society estimates that nearly 40 percent of the nation's 50 million smokers tried to quit for the day. About one-tenth, or 2 million people, will stop permanently, said Paul Rosenberg, of the cancer society in New York.

Among the estimated 1.5 million smokers in the Bay Area, about 300,000 were expected to stop smoking yesterday, according to Helen Jones of the cancer society in San Francisco. Jones said 30 percent of those who stopped smoking for the day were likely to stop permanently.

BAY AREA EVENTS

Some of those who were trying to kick the habit yesterday were teenagers at George Washington High School in San Francisco, where an estimated 300 smoking students vowed to quit.

Students set up a "Smokeout Survival Station" where smokers willing to quit were "adopted" by nonsmoking students who helped them resist the urge to puff.

"There's a lot of nervous energy around here," said Don Leach, a teacher and counselor who helped organize the school's smokeout campaign.

In San Jose, students wore red to show they "say no to smoking." In San Mateo, there was an anti-smoking concert and health fair at the College of San Mateo. In Hayward, newborns were dressed in "I'm a Born Nonsmoker" T-shirts. And in San Rafael, a "Smokeless Comedy Night" was held at New George's club on Fourth Street.

Outside the Bay Area, Amtrak sponsored a whistlestop no-smoking journey through Southern California from San Diego to Santa Barbara. At a stop in Glendale, the train picked up actor Michael Gross of NBC's "Family Ties" and greeted Cancerette, a dancing cigaret pack.

In other parts of the country, cigarets were swapped for apples, gum and "cold turkey" sandwiches.

TOBACCO BARBEQUE

In Hammond, La., pharmacist Don Fellows Jr. burned four cartons of cigarets, four boxes of cigars and several boxes of chewing tobacco in a hibachi outside his store.

The burning tobacco was all he had left after deciding several months ago to stop ordering the products.

"I thought I would make a statement: maybe someone would stop and think and stop smoking cigarets before it was too late," Fellows said.

The "Great American Smokeout" also touched the heart of Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco magnate R. J. Reynolds. Reynolds joined with Pleasanton-based publisher SyberVision to launch a $20 million television advertising campaign accusing the tobacco industry of addicting millions of Americans.

"My grandfather, R. J. Reynolds, helped get America hooked on cigarets through clever advertising. Now, I'm going to use the power of advertising to get America unhooked," Patrick Reynolds said.

But not everyone was willing to kick the habit.

GREAT AMERICAN WELCOME

The Tobacco Institute, the Washington trade group for tobacco companies, chose this week to launch its new campaign, called the Great American Welcome.

The campaign is aimed at hotels and restaurants. The institute is trying to get the businesses to display red-white-and-blue signs welcoming both smokers and nonsmokers to their establishments.

The signs show one hand holding a cigaret; the other does not. Both hands give a thumbs-up sign.

SMOKING-RELATED DEATHS

Also yesterday, the federal government released a report that shows that Kentucky has the nation's highest smoking-related death rate. Utah has the lowest.

Kentucky reported 176 smoking-related deaths for every 100,000 residents in 1985, the national Centers for Disease Control reported. Utah reported just 45 smoking-related deaths for every 100,000 people over the course of the year.

The CDC, blamed smoking for 16 percent, or 314,574, of all the deaths that occurred in the United States in 1985.

Smoking causes lung cancer, heart disease, emphysema and other life-threatening illnesses.

California, the state with the largest population, led the country overall in total smoking-related deaths with 28,533, including 236 children, according to the government's first state-by-state breakdown of such deaths. But at 109.5 deaths per 100,000 people in 1985, the last year for which statistics were available, the state's rate was lower than the national average of 130.0.

PHOTO; Caption: Jason Peneyra signed a no-smoking pledge at the 'Smokeout Survival Station' in San Francisco's Washington High School / BY JERRY TELFER/THE CHRONICLE

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Metro; 2; Metro Desk

Anything But a Drag-Smokeout Hailed

GEORGE BUNDY SMITH
Times Staff Writer
492 words
18 November 1988
Los Angeles Times
Orange County
3

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1988 All Rights Reserved)

Alice Dodge of Capistrano Beach has been smoking for 3 years and really does not plan to give it up. But Thursday, she sat by the pool at the Dana Point Resort, nibbling carrots and celery in an effort to keep her mind off cigarettes.

She was joined there by 50 other smokers nibbling vegetables and cold-turkey sandwiches as they observed the 12th annual Great American Smokeout, an effort by the American Cancer Society to persuade people to stop smoking.

"I've been a good girl today," Dodge said.

But her friend, Adelia Williamson of San Clemente, 68, wasn't sure that Dodge's effort went untainted.

"She took a walk to the lobby before. She won't tell me if she smoked or not," said Williamson, who sat with a button on her dress that read "Smoking Stinks."

"It's none of your business," cracked Dodge, who declined to specify her age, as she reached for another carrot.

Williamson, who smoked for 15 years before quitting, had "adopted" Dodge for a day to try to help her kick the habit.

"When I first asked her to join the Smokeout, she said, `I'll let you know,' " Williamson recalled. "But she called back . . . and I'm very happy."

Strongheart of Laguna Beach ("just Strongheart") said on the boardwalk at Main Beach Park that he's not too sure about the Smokeout.

"I'm not sure if this is permanent," he said, "but I'm gonna take it day by day. "I know that smoking is not a good thing, but I smoked for 7 years to see what it was all about," said Strongheart, 45. "I guess we have to take more responsibility for our health."

The quit-smoking effort apparently didn't reach everyone. "That's today?" said Jon Flick as he sat across from Strongheart and puffed on a cigarette.

"I thought it was the 20th," he said, taking another drag. "That's my birthday."

50 Million U.S. Smokers

The American Cancer Society estimated that nearly 40% of the 50 million U.S. smokers would try to quit Thursday and that one-tenth, about 2 million of them, would succeed.

A Gallup survey said 19.5 million of the nation's smokers tried to quit for a day last year.

In New York, the cast and crew of off-Broadway's "Steel Magnolias" went off cigarettes cold turkey.

Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, helped launch a $20-million TV ad campaign accusing the tobacco industry of addicting millions of Americans.

PHOTO: Donald P. Kiely, head of county's Great American Smokeout effort, gives information packet to Alice Dodge. / GARY AMBROSE / Los Angeles Times PHOTO: `I know that smoking is not a good thing, but I smoked for 7 years to see what it was all about.'-Strongheart

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Marketing WANNA WATCH MIAMI VICE OR A HALF-HOUR AD? --- Programs with a pitch spread, but the FTC's stepping in

Richard W. Anderson in Philadelphia
827 words
28 November 1988
Business Week
Pg. 114
Vol. Number 3081

Copyright 1988 McGraw-Hill, Inc.

''My guest today is one of Hollywood's biggest stars. His face has been in every major magazine, and he's often seen with some of the sexiest women in the world. Today, for the first time ever, he's going to reveal his very own personal method for looking so good.'' --from Morgan Brittany on Beauty. All right--so it isn't exactly The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour. But it isn't the TV talk show it sounds like either. While George Hamilton and former Dallas star Morgan Brittany share beauty tips, viewers are encouraged to call toll-free to order the George Hamilton Skin Care System for $39.95. The show is really a 30-minute commercial, paid for by Pantron I Corp., which markets George Hamilton's cosmetics.''The half-hour format is an extremely powerful tool,'' says Pantron President Hal Z. Lederman, and more and more marketers agree. Program-length commercials hawking everything from financial planning seminars to hair-growth elixirs are changing the complexion of late-night and weekend TV.

Advertisers will buy $160 million worth of airtime for these 30- and 60-minute shows in 1989, 28% more than they did in 1988.

The industry's growth faces some serious threats, however. The Federal Trade Commission is cracking down on shows that unsuspecting viewers might mistake for regular programming. Moreover, some cable channels are cutting back on the amount of time they are selling to these controversial sponsors. Program-length commercials began airing about five years ago. They often feature talk-show formats and such well-known faces as Chuck Connors, Meredith MacRae, and Alex Karras. One forthcoming show stars antismoking crusader Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco king R. J. Reynolds, plugging a quit-smoking program. SALES EXPLOSION. A few years ago, advertisers such as Procter & Gamble Co. experimented on cable TV with two- and five-minute spots combining recipes and other information with a product pitch. But the sponsors of these longer shows are usually small companies looking for cheap advertising. USA Network, a cable channel, runs about 20 hours of program-length ads a week. A half-hour on Saturday morning costs $12,000 and typically reaches about 230,000 viewers. In contrast, a 30-second prime-time ad on network TV costs about $100,000 and is seen by about 20 million viewers.

Cable and independent TV stations were quick to embrace the new ad format. Sponsors often pay cash up front, and the shows fill hard-to-sell airtime. Black Entertainment Television, Lifetime, and Financial News Network run about 60, 30, and 12 hours of program-length commercials a week, respectively. But some cable channels, worried that the ads will turn viewers off, have cut back on these shows. USA Network, for instance, is taking back its 10 a.m.-to-noon Saturday slot for its own shows.

While the FTC hasn't made a general ruling on the shows, it's investigating whether or not they are misleading. Joseph Sugarman, chairman of JS&A Group Inc., settled a dispute with the FTC on Nov. 2 over a 30-minute spot pushing sunglasses, which JS&A sells by mail. The FTC said the show, ''Consumer Challenge,'' failed to inform viewers that the panel of guest ''experts'' were paid participants. Sugarman took the show off the air a few months ago and has agreed to make changes.

Most cable channels run disclaimers before and during the shows warning viewers that they are watching ads. But some companies that make these shows say disclaimers are unnecessary. ''I don't think the consumer gives a tinker's damn,'' says Tom Fenton, co-founder of Synchronal Corp., the largest producer and marketer of half-hour ads.

As cable channels make less time available for the shows, their producers are scouting other markets. Many are relying more on independent stations, which so far show no signs of cutting back. Steven A. DeVore, chairman of SyberVision Systems Inc., a company that produces ads hawking its line of self-improvement tapes, says he is trying to start a cable channel that shows only program-length commercials.

Twenty-four hours of self-help ads? ''That would be a scary proposition,'' says John Silvestri, a senior vice-president at USA Network. It's also scary for advertisers. Once viewers figure out that they're watching a string of 30-minute ads, they're likely to do the same thing they do to a 30-second spot: Zap it.

THE LEADERS IN 30-MINUTE ADS Agency Spending (millions of dollars) 1988 1989* SYNCHRONAL $25 $40 SYBERVISION 20 30 MEDIA ARTS INTERNATIONAL 15 22 INDUSTRY TOTAL $125 $160 *Estimates DATA: COMPANY REPORTS, BW

Photograph: REYNOLDS: THE ANTISMOKING CRUSADER'S SHOW ENCOURAGES VIEWERS TO KICK THE HABIT PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMIE TANAKA

 

 

 

NEWS

SMOKE STICK LIGHTS UP A CONTROVERSY

J A Lobbia, Special to The Tribune
753 words
18 December 1988
Chicago Tribune
FINAL EDITION; C
6

A doctor talked about the virtues of smoking. A man whose family built its fortune by selling tobacco products decried cigarettes. And smokers didn't show up.

That was the scene at a public forum held by the Missouri Board of Health for a closer look at Premier, the newfangled tobacco product being test marketed in Missouri and in Arizona by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.

Premier is a high-tech tobacco stick in which aluminum capsules containing tobacco pellets are heated instead of burned. That produces less smoke and ash than traditional cigarettes-and, Reynolds hopes, less pressure on smokers to abandon their habit in an age of increasing public criticism and restriction.

Although Premier at first sight looks like a traditional cigarette, it acts differently, remaining largely intact rather than being slowly reduced to a pile of ashes. It even comes with its own instruction booklet.

Reynolds says Premier is the best thing that's happened to smokers since filtered cigarettes. Many health officials disagree.

"Along comes R.J. Reynolds with this 'new' cigarette, but it isn't a cigarette at all," says Dr. Jack Kayes of the St. Louis Metropolitan Medical Society. "It's a drug delivery system disguised to look like a cigarette."

The two sides are so far apart they can't even agree on what to call Premier. That was the focus of last Thursday's hearing, which was held to gather public comments to forward to the Food and Drug Administration.

Together with the state health board and the American Medical Association, Kayes wants the FDA to classify Premier as a drug-a status that would effectively kill the product. Reynolds insists Premier is a cigarette and should be sold as other cigarettes, which are unregulated by the FDA.

No FDA decision is expected in the near future. If the agency labels Premier a drug, it would have to meet federal standards for medical safety and effectiveness-a move that David Iauco, a Reynolds senior vice president, says the company won't even try.

The strongest public claim Reynolds makes is that Premier is "cleaner" than traditional cigarettes.

Iauco says the opposition's response to Premier is ironic. "They're the ones who raised these criticisms about smoke, and so we respond to that with this cigarette," he complains. "And what do they do? They want to ban it."

But Matthew Myers, director of the National Coalition on Smoking and Health, says opposition to Premier is based on deep mistrust of the cigarette industry.

"This is one of the most dangerous, deceptive PR campaigns of all time," Myers told the health board. "It's a house of mirrors; an extraordinary deception because they're telling consumers that they should smoke Premier because of the health benefits, but they're telling regulators that they're making no such claim."

Reynolds had its own witnesses, including Sam Simmons, a doctor who defended tobacco as no more addictive than ice cream or caffeine. Simmons, who works for Reynolds, even touted the benefits of smoking, which he says include reduced hypertension and weight.

The antismoking forces trotted out their own golden boy, Patrick Reynolds, the 40-year-old grandson of Richard Joshua Reynolds, who founded the tobacco company before the turn of the century. Two years ago, Patrick Reynolds sold his stock in the company. Now he makes a living by lecturing about the hazards of cigarettes and promoting motivational tapes to stop smoking.

"Today the evidence against tobacco is overwhelming, yet R.J. Reynolds insists that nicotine hasn't been proven to cause cancer, or any disease at all," Patrick Reynolds told the health board.

"These are words that smokers love to hear, but the question is: Are the people at RJR Nabisco greedy, profit-hungry and amoral, or do they care and have a social conscience as they claim?"

At times the debate about Premier was larded with scientific minutiae; other times, the rhetoric was oversimplified and hyperbolic.

Several opponents tried to link Premier, and smoking in general, to larger social ills.

In the end, Premier's death knell may be sounded by the market, not by antismoking lobbies or government regulations. Although Reynolds won't comment until the test period is over, poor initial sales in the Missouri and Arizona test markets were reported.

CAPTION:

PHOTO: AP Laserphoto. Premier, the new R.J. Reynolds tobacco product, comes with its own instruction booklet.

PHOTO

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METRO

Tobacco king's grandson attacks cigarette ads

Jeffrey Brody:The Register
585 words
6 March 1989
The Orange County Register
EVENING
b01

Copyright (c) 1989 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

When smokers ask Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, why he campaigns so vigorously against cigarettes, he tells the sad tale of his father, who died when the younger Reynolds was 15.

"Cigarettes took my dad away from me. I remember him gasping for breath," Reynolds said. "My only memories of my father are of a man lying down on his back, dying of emphysema."

Tall, square-jawed and athletic, Reynolds, 40, a former actor who starred in the science-fiction movie "The Eliminators," could easily play the role of a corporate spokesman for the company that spawned his family fortune.

Instead, he has chosen to spurn the tobacco industry and speak out against smoking. He has co-written a book, "The Gilded Leaf," about the R.J. Reynolds family and fortune, which will be published in April. And last week, he incorporated the Patrick Reynolds Foundation for a Smoke-free America.

On Sunday, Reynolds drove from his Beverly Hills home to the Disneyland Hotel to plead his case against tobacco before a convention of the California Medical Association.

"When my grandfather began making cigarettes at the turn of the century, he didn't know they caused cancer, heart disease and lung disorders," Reynolds said. "Now the truth needs to be told about smoking."

Reynolds, who was active in the Proposition 99 campaign to raise cigarette taxes, said he gave away his last two shares of Reynolds stock to help Prop. 99, which won voter approval in November.

The proposition went into effect in January, raising the state tax on a pack of cigarettes from 10 cents to 35 cents.

He said the two Reynolds shares were a present given to him in a sealed envelope by a brother who made him promise not to sell what was in the envelope.

"I didn't sell the shares. I donated them to Proposition 99," Reynolds said, straight-faced.

Despite his stance on smoking, Reynolds said, he maintains warm relations with relatives. "My brother Mike says, `If you don't smoke, don't start, but if you must smoke, smoke Reynolds.' "

No member of the family has worked in the tobacco industry in 40 years, Reynolds said, although some have received trust funds and dividends from tobacco stock.

Reynolds, a smoker for 16 years, quit in 1984. He said he tried to quit many times before he was successful. In the years since, he has dedicated his life to the campaign against smoking, appearing before the US Senate, state legislative bodies, schoolchildren and anti-smoking groups.

He told physicians Sunday that he supports a ban on the sale of cigarettes to those under 21, and a complete ban on cigarette advertising.

"Ninety-one percent of all those people who smoke get cemented in their nicotine addiction before age 20," he said.

He called cigarette advertising "the greatest abuse of freedom of speech in history."

"The tobacco companies are spending $.5 to 3 billion dollars per year on advertising, or more than $8 for every man, woman and child in this country," Reynolds said.

"When cigarettes are shown to be killing 1,000 Americans every day of the year, to allow continued advertising of them is plainly a great wrong in our society."

BLACK & WHITE PHOTO; Caption: Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, speaks out against tobacco at a California Medical Association meeting Sunday in Anaheim.; Credit: Charlaine Brown

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Metro; 2; Metro Desk

Tobacco Has Been Friend and Foe of Reynolds Grandson

MARCIDA DODSON
Times Staff Writer
1,188 words
6 March 1989
Los Angeles Times
Orange County
1

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1989 All Rights Reserved)

Tobacco has made his family flourish, but these days the grandson of R.J. Reynolds sees no good in cigarettes.

A descendant of the biggest name in the industry who lost his father to emphysema brought on by smoking, he has spent the last 3 years speaking out against the industry, encouraging people to stop puffing, and fighting for restrictions on cigarette advertising and sales.

And Sunday, Patrick Reynolds' campaign for a smoke-free America brought him to Anaheim and a sympathetic audience of doctors gathered for the California Medical Assn. convention.

Reynolds, who gave away his last two shares of company stock last year to help finance the successful voter initiative that increased California's cigarette tax, said he does not consider it odd that he is using the Reynolds name to fight the industry that made his family millionaires.

"Cigarettes took my dad away from my life. If a father isn't there to show his son the family business, he's got to make his own way," he told the people gathered for a session called "News From the Front-Update on the Tobacco Revolution."

"My only memories of my father are of a man lying on his back," hooked up to an oxygen tank, he said. "I remember him gasping for breath."

Reynolds, 40, said he sold his shares of R.J. Reynolds stock in 1979, even though he was a smoker then, because "I didn't feel comfortable garnering my income from that. . . .

"In one hand I had a cigarette, and in the other I had the phone, telling my broker to divest," Reynolds said in comments after his speech. (A few years later, Reynolds was given two more shares of family stock by his half-brother, Will, who made him promise not to sell them. Instead, he donated them to the Proposition 99 campaign last year.)

Reynolds, who began smoking at 18, finally stopped in 1984. "I got hooked like everyone else," he said. Two years later, he began his crusade against the tobacco industry.

His top priority in his fight against tobacco companies, he told the doctors Sunday, is to get Congress to limit the export of U.S. cigarettes. Since 1968, smoking abroad has increased 83%, he said.

Recruiting Abroad

It is a travesty that as the numbers of smokers in the United States decrease, American tobacco companies are magnifying their efforts to recruit new customers abroad, particularly in Third World countries.

Yet, poor people abroad can least afford to buy cigarettes or pay for medical care when they develop lung and heart disease, he said.

"They are taking advantage of people eager for the U.S. products but whose awareness of the health consequences of smoking is far less than our own," he said. In the Philippines, he said, no warning labels are required on cigarettes, as they are in the United States, and higher tar levels are allowed in some countries.

"We have one set of standards for our own citizens and another set of standards for foreign peoples," he said. "As a direct consequence of the tobacco companies' recent advertising and marketing efforts, there will be tens of millions of deaths which would not have otherwise occurred and immeasurable pain and human suffering."

Tobacco companies have maintained that there is no proven link between smoking and disease.

Treat Cigarettes as Liquor

His second priority, he said, is to treat cigarettes as liquor and ban sales to people under 21. Merchants who sell to minors should face harsh penalties, he said, adding that more than 90% of smokers begin before they are 20.

Reynolds also called for a ban on all cigarette advertising.

"Cigarette advertising is, in my opinion, the biggest lie ever perpetrated on the American public," he said. Tobacco companies spend $8 on advertising for every person in the United States each year, he said.

"When cigarettes are shown to be killing 1,000 Americans every day of the year, to allow continued advertising of them is plainly a great wrong in our society," Reynolds said.

Further, he said, cigarette taxes should be raised. For every 10-cent increase in the price of a pack, there is a corresponding decrease in purchases among minors, he said. If taxes were raised enough to cover the health costs of smoking, each pack would cost $3, he said. Nonsmokers, who make up 75% of the population, are paying the health care costs of smoking, Reynolds contended.

Helped Fight for Ban

While Reynolds helped fight for the current ban on smoking on flights of 2 hours or less, he said that the ban should be extended to all flights. Airliners recirculate air during flights, and because more smoke accumulates over long periods of time, the air becomes filled with even more secondhand smoke on longer flights, he said.

When he is not speaking against the tobacco companies, Reynolds, who lives in Beverly Hills, is trying to revive his acting career. (He had a bit part in the movie "Nashville" and starred in "Eliminators" a few years ago.) He recently incorporated a nonprofit group called the Patrick Reynolds' Foundation for a Smoke-free America to fight the tobacco industry.

He also has finished a book, "The Gilded Leaf: Triumph, Tragedy and Tobacco," a history of the Reynolds family, which he says is fraught with business, political and personal intrigue. The book, published by Little, Brown & Co., will be released April 26.

His family has flourished on and been devastated by tobacco, he said. His grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, chewed tobacco and died of cancer of the pancreas in 1918, when his son, R.J. (Dick) Reynolds Jr., was 12. R.J. Jr. died in 1964 when Patrick was 15, and his mother, a smoker, later died of heart disease. Two aunts, also smokers, died of emphysema and cancer, he said.

"My family was decimated by cigarettes," he said.

Reynolds did not know his father well, and he died in seclusion, he said. R.J. Jr. married four times. He had four sons during his first marriage and two-including Patrick Reynolds-during his second. He had no children during his third marriage. He was married 3 years to his fourth wife, and a daughter was born the day after R. J. Jr. died, Reynolds said.

"None of us even knew she was pregnant," he said.

Although some of his cousins are not completely happy with his fight against the family business, Reynolds said he gets along well with his brothers.

His father disinherited his sons and left his fortune to his last wife, Reynolds said. Although there is some speculation that the will was changed, another theory is that his father "wanted his sons to work." Reynolds and his brother and half-brothers inherited their interest in the family business from their grandmother, who acquired the fortune from their grandfather.

"I'm sure he never foresaw this," Reynolds said of his fight with the tobacco industry.

PHOTO: Patrick Reynolds / Los Angeles Times

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PART II

A Past in Ashes A former Winston he-man vows to stamp out cigarette smoking. See end of text for sidebar: A Sincere Conversion - or a Smokescreen?

By David Behrens
2,324 words
30 March 1989
Newsday
NASSAU AND SUFFOLK
04

(Copyright Newsday Inc., 1989)

FROM THE BACK of the school bus, one of the guys asked the fat kid, "You wanna smoke?"

"Sure," said Dave Goerlitz, who was a fat kid at age 14.

At Pennsauken High, in the smoky year 1964, only the cool guys smoked in the back of the bus and, Goerlitz knew, cool was the only cure for fat. He bought his first pack of Marlboros that afternoon.

Years later, he would describe himself as "the John Belushi of Pennsauken, New Jersey," the class clown who felt grown up only when he puffed away, just like the Marlboro man.

Goerlitz' father was a Baptist preacher, so smoking was a secret passion, as were his fantasies of playing heroic roles like Zorro or Tarzan. In real life, he was an ungainly, insecure, former bedwetter.

But time blew by like a wisp of smoke. The fat kid grew up. Served in the Army. Married a pretty girl from high school. Landed a job with a trucking firm. Had a couple of kids. Life wasn't bad at all, except for his ulcer. And being fat. * * *

For almost 10 years, Dave Goerlitz worked for a Ryder truck rental agency in New Jersey, worrying about the big rigs breaking down somewhere in the night. "It was a high-stress job and I smoked all the time. But it looked like a pretty good career, with benefits and security and all that." Certainly he was able to put enough food on the table. His weight edged to 240 pounds. Then, at 29, the ulcer started to bleed and his doctor warned: Take off the pounds or else.

"I experienced a tremendous loss of weight. First thirty-five or forty pounds. Then ten more and then another ten. Finally I was down seventy-five pounds. I had cheekbones!

"It was a tremendous shock to my system. I was a guy who couldn't buy a date if his life depended on it, and all of a sudden, strangers were coming up to me and asking, `Are you a model?' What an ego trip!"

Well, why not? Goerlitz started slowly, staying at Ryder while landing modeling jobs in Philadelphia. Soon, he was knocking on doors in Manhattan.

One day, an agent named David Roos called. An ad agency had interviewed more than 900 men but couldn't find the right faces. Eventually, three men were chosen: John Martin, now a regular on the TV soap "One Life to Live," Corbin Bernsen of "L.A. Law" - and Goerlitz.

In 1980, they became Winston Men, smoking their way to the top, literally, of the modeling world:

There was Dave Goerlitz, rugged and craggy-faced, saving a stranded climber on a mountain in Arizona. There was Dave Goerlitz, at the controls of a helicopter. There was Dave Goerlitz, in Life magazine's centerfold, wearing his search-and-rescue windbreaker, lighting up a Winston, at Alaska's Glacier Bay.

For six years, until 1986, Goerlitz searched and rescued for fun and profit. He earned close to $100,000 a year and was treated like a star, he said. He and the other Winston Men - most of whom did not smoke off camera - posed for more than 36,000 photographs. When the ad agency lost the Winston account in 1986, Goerlitz observed a number of contractual limits for two years. He was barred from working in any commercials remotely negative to the world of smoking, including toothpaste and mouthwash. Expressing a dark thought about smoking was out of the question.

At the time, Goerlitz had no dark thoughts to express. He was smoking three packs a day, even though, he says now, it wasn't much of a pleasure. Cancer? What did cigarettes have to do with it? As the former Winston Man puts it, with an ingenuousness some listeners find incredulous, "I was part of the poisoning of America and I didn't know any better."

Four months ago, Goerlitz joined the national crusade against cigarette smoking. The turning point, he says, was a series of visits to a Boston cancer hospital, where his brother was a patient. "It hit me - all these people are my age and they're dying."

Last November, at age 38, he stopped smoking for the first time since 1964, the year it all began in the back of a school bus - the same year the surgeon general issued the first official warning to Americans about the hazards of smoking. For Goerlitz, the ego trip had ended and a guilt trip was about to begin. * * *

The fifthand sixth-graders from PS 63 on Manhattan's Lower East Side listened intently to the former Winston Man. Maybe it was the snazzy outfit - paratrooper windbreaker, fatigues and boots. Maybe it was the rugged movie-star looks. Maybe it was the subject matter.

For an hour, they heard horror stories about the perils of cigarettes and testimonials from three ex-smokers who spoke with artificial voice boxes. One of them, exhaling in robot-like monotones, warned: "I started to smoke when I was twelve, like you are now, and this is what happened to me."

Goerlitz followed. "Oh, I was cool," he told the kids at the program moderated by Wall Street broker Joseph Cherner, founder of Anti-Smoking Educational Services. "I was the Winston Man up there on the mountain. Until last November, when I stopped smoking, I thought of myself as a hero . . . flying helicopters, rescuing people off mountaintops, saving lives. Well, the tobacco industry lies to you. I wasn't cool. I was the biggest excuse of a wimp there was."

In fact, Goerlitz sees himself as far worse - an accessory to murder. "I'll have to live with that . . . that's why I plan to spend the rest of my life trying to bring the tobacco industry to its knees."

But why, some of the children wondered, did he play the part of the Winston Man all those years? As one of them asked, "Why didn't he read the warning on the pack?" Goerlitz also wonders why. So do some of his friends. So do his former friends. * * *

Since December, Goerlitz has been campaigning against the evils of smoking with almost compulsive religiosity. His antagonists within the tobacco industry look upon him as an out-of-work model trying to build a new career on the ashes of the old one.

Goerlitz, who hopes to resume his stalled modeling career, sees himself as a man on a new search-and-rescue mission. It began, he recounts, when he volunteered his services in November to the Philadelphia chapter of the American Cancer Society. He thought being on a few local talk shows might give him an edge during the early weeks of nicotine withdrawal. "Maybe I'd think twice before lighting up again, being a hypocrite in public," he told himself.

He claims he had no idea that he'd draw national attention. But within the anti-smoking camp, Goerlitz was treated like some Gorbachev come to town to promote free enterprise.

Within weeks, Goerlitz made his debut on network and local television news shows, the turncoat of the month. Hometown newspapers celebrated him. Local schools invited him. Anti-smoking commercials were planned around him. After a slow year, it was good to be working again, even for pocket money.

The travels go on. Goerlitz has been to Albany to help promote the anti-smoking proposals of the New York State Coalition on Smoking and Health. He's going to Harvard, the University of Illinois and the University of Southern California. And he will return to New York for an assembly at IS 44 in Manhattan next Tuesday. * * *

After the assembly at PS 63, Goerlitz talked about the disappearance of Dave Goerlitz.

"In the 1980s, the Winston Man took over my life. Everywhere I went, my wife would say to me, `Hey, would you stop being the Winston Man! Can't you just try to be who you are?' "

Until his mid-1988 trip to see his brother, who had lymphatic cancer, Goerlitz claims he never worried about cancer. "I don't know why but I could not believe our government would allow cigarette smoking to be legal when they cracked down on so may other things. And the warning on the package? I saw that as just some legalistic maneuver, to get around problems."

Goerlitz thinks he may have blocked out a lot of facts and feelings because, as a former fat kid, he was so grateful to Winston for his career. "I didn't want to be fat ever again. But in the hospital, I watched older women hugging their sons and daughters who were dying first. I really saw what this disease was doing. Ninety percent of the patients had terminal lung cancer. By the time I left Boston, I believed, for the first time, that cigarettes were killing those people."

He hadn't believed that earlier. In the days on location, Goerlitz remembered, the Winston men would sit around with sales executives. "They'd tell us to recall what we felt like when we were twelve or thirteen, playing soldier, pretending we were on a mission . . . to get that kind of look on our faces.

"I remember when we heard that several of the original Marlboro Men died of lung cancer. We were so macho we'd joke and say, `Well, we'll have to quit when we get that old.' I remember that there were five of us on location in Arizona. Only two of us smoked. The other three thought we were nuts to smoke but we didn't think about dying. Maybe we'd die fifty years later but not prematurely. I was only thirty-two or so and those Marlboro guys, they were in their forties!" * * *

On Nov. 25, Goerlitz returned to the 20th reunion of his high school class. "The week before, after I quit smoking, I'd been on the network news shows. When I walked in, everyone knew that the little fat kid had become the Winston Man. I felt so proud, everyone talking about me, looking at me. I could feel it. Guys would come up to me and say, `My wife wants to meet you.' I would not have missed that for the world, being this new honcho walking around on turf he didn't own before. When I was a kid, I swore to myself that someday, I'd walk into a room and turn heads and spite everyone who ever made fun of me."

But even at this moment of triumph, he worried to himself: "What if I gain back those seventy-five pounds?" He also remembered, years before, the photograph in the Life centerfold, the all-American hero lighting up a Winston. "I just wished I could have let people know that was me, the fat kid, but I didn't know how to tell them." In the end, Goerlitz did find the way. **** A Sincere Conversion - or a Smokescreen?

DAVID FISCHEL, senior vice president of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., keeps a file on Dave Goerlitz in his office on the 17th floor of the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem, N.C. Since January, people have been calling to ask about Goerlitz' campaign to "bring the tobacco industry to its knees."

At best, Fischel says, Goerlitz' attack on the manufacturer of Winston, Salem and Camel cigarettes is "silly" and uninformed. At worst, he suggests, Goerlitz is a hypocrite.

Defection is nothing new to R.J. Reynolds. Last year, Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R.J. Reynolds, sold his stock in the company, kicked a 15-year smoking habit and began selling stop-smoking kits. Like Goerlitz, Reynolds went on the TV circuit, becoming a nationally known anti-smoking activist.

Goerlitz says he stopped smoking on Nov. 17, 1988, after an emotionally jarring trip to a Boston cancer hospital last June. But, claims Fischel, Goerlitz contacted R.J. Reynolds on July 28, 1988, seeking a promotional job.

"He wanted to go on a tour to promote cigarettes, to be an expert witness on smoking. We told him that there was no need for his services," says Betsy Annese, a Fischel aide. She says Goerlitz then asked if he had the right to work for one of Reynolds' competitors. In an Oct. 13 letter, she says, Goerlitz was told that he could work for other cigarette makers after Nov. 11, 1988, when his contract expired.

Annese claims Goerlitz called again on Nov. 2, asking for a copy of his contract and "said that since the competitor [another cigarette manufacturer! did not need his services, he was going to work for the anti-smoking forces."

Goerlitz says he called the Reynolds office in May or June in regard to a possible job with Philip Morris, "before I visited my brother at the hospital and before I decided to give up smoking." His only other contact with Reynolds, he says, was on Nov. 2, when he sought a copy of his contract to examine provisions regarding anti-smoking activity. "But I did not tell them what I was about to do."

For the record, Fischel discounts Goerlitz' attack on Reynolds, contending that advertising is not a major factor in encouraging anyone to start smoking. Most ads are designed to get smokers to switch brands, "which is where the money is in our industry," he says.

1) Photo-Dave Goerlitz says he thought smoking was really macho when he was a Winston Man in the early '80s. 2) Newsday Photo by Bruce Newman-Dave Goerlitz, who smoked for 24 years until last November, takes the no-smoking pledge with students at PS 63 in Manhattan.

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RJR DEAREST. (PATRICK REYNOLDS HAS WRITTEN BOOK ABOUT R.J. REYNOLDS FAMILY) (FORTUNE PEOPLE)

By Mark Alpert
310 words
10 April 1989
Fortune
142

Copyright Time Inc. 1989

The smoke hasn't even cleared yet on RJR Nabisco's $25 billion leveraged buyout, and now the tobacco and cookie company faces a nemesis almost as frightening as a corporate raider: a tell-all book. Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R. J. Reynolds, is co-author of The Gilded Leaf, a juicy family history that revels in the peccadilloes of his Camel-making forebears. Reynolds's book, to be published April 26 by Little Brown, tells about the rise of R.J. and the decline of his playboy heirs in prose that is as flat as the prospectus for RJR's recent LBO. Sample tidbit: "R.J.'s sexual proclivities caught him in a bind typical of the Victorian era."

This isn't the first time that Reynolds, 40, has blown smoke at RJR. A former actor who became an antismoking crusader three years ago, Reynolds testified before Congress in favor of a ban on cigarette advertising and is now the spokesman for a California company that teaches smokers how to quit. "Some of my cousins are very unhappy about the book," Reynolds says. "I frankly don't care what they think."

None of Reynolds's close relatives work for RJR Nabisco. Despite his lack of business experience, Reynolds tried to get a seat on the RJR board several years ago, but he says the company refused to give him an interview. He doesn't hold out much hope for a change of attitude under the new ownership of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts. Although Reynolds won't comment on the possibility, his book has the makings of a great television miniseries. Just don't expect to see an Oreo ad during the commercial breaks.

CAPTION: Reynolds: airing dirty linen ILLUSTRATION: portrait CAPTION: Patrick Reynolds.

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BOOK WORLD

The High-Living Barons of Tobacco Road

Edwin M. Yoder Jr.
1,317 words
16 April 1989
The Washington Post
FINAL
x03

THE GILDED LEAF Triumph, Tragedy and Tobacco- Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Family and Fortune By Patrick Reynolds and Tom Shachtman Little, Brown. 353 pp. $19.95

IN THE PIEDMONT North Carolina of my youth, Winston-Salem was an experience. The reek of tobacco dust assailed one's nose, while the long, intriguing walls of Reynolda-the baronial family estate built by the tobacco fortune-incited curiosity beyond measure.

When I asked boyish questions about the folks who lived behind those walls, however, my father would purse his lips and clear his throat; and I knew the meaning of these signals without asking: Certain things were not discussed with children; and that included-as I only later learned-the sensational events of the evening of July 5, 1932, when one of the Reynolds heirs, Z. Smith, was mysteriously shot at Reynolda after an evening of revels. Even if scandals had been the sort of thing my parents discussed with children, it would have required a more precocious imagination than mine to compass the colorful secrets of Reynolda. But now, in our tell-it-all age, they are here in print. And they make an altogether fascinating story.

The Gilded Leaf is a professionally written mixture of tobacco tales and dynastic chronicles. The Reynoldses, certainly the most interesting of the tobacco dynasties, had long been substantial farm and small-manufacturing folk in Virginia before R.J. Reynolds migrated southward in the later 19th century to found his tobacco empire. They are labeled "planters" here, though "gentry" might be a bit closer to the mark. From the first, the family combined a taste for luxury and extravagance with asceticism-though much more of the former than the latter in the branch chiefly chronicled here. In everyone, however, there was a marked talent for making money. Family tradition ascribed the golden touch to a lucky gold piece, the "Joshua coin," whose touch brought luck. (The Reynoldses, appropriately, are among the few American families who have founded two giant manufacturing fortunes, one in tobacco and the other in metals.)

The main hero of the story told here, however, is R.J. Reynolds, who moved to the crossroads of Winston (now the bustling city of Winston-Salem) after the Civil War and flourished as a confectioner of chewing tobacco. This was some years before the development of an efficient cigarette-cutting machine made smoking the dominant, and most profitable, form of tobacco consumption (and the camel-actually sketched from a visiting circus dromedary-the most famous of its symbols).

Co-author Patrick Reynolds, a grandson of the founder who now calls himself an "anti-smoking activist," is persuaded that his grandfather only began concentrating on cigarettes after satisfying himself that they weren't a health hazard. (Chewing tobacco, odd as it may seem today, was initially thought of as a digestant and even "a preservative of the teeth.")

Old R.J. Reynolds had a talent for friendship (he borrowed confidentially from his rival James Buchanan "Buck" Duke to expand his struggling business) and for mergers and acquisitions. His own favorite chew was a competitive brand called Brown Mule. R.J. discovered its appeal one day when he casually spat some Brown Mule juice from the window of his railway parlor car and into the face of a station bystander. "When the fellow charged into the . . . car R.J. was ready to apologize, but the man only wanted to know the name of the chew, since he intended to switch to it instantly." Soon, R. J. had bought out the Brown Brothers and acquired the Mule.

R.J.'s big break, however, was less the product of his own considerable ingenuity and enterprise than of government policy. In the antitrust spirit of the TR-Taft years, James McReynolds (later the Supreme Court justice) prosecuted Buck Duke's American Tobacco trust and won a courtroom victory upheld by the Supreme Court in 1911. The bustup of the tobacco cartel, which R.J. had avoided, opened the way to competition and to fabulous fortune.

Like many of his male descendants, R.J. Reynolds was a gallant and ladies' man; and he was into his fifties, a bachelor about town, when he fell in love with and married his much younger cousin and secretary Katharine Smith. They produced four children and built Reynolda to house them-a grand imitation European manor complete with artificial lakes and ponds, stables, even a church and school. The empire was no sooner complete, however, when R.J. fell ill and died of cancer, leaving the young widow and four lively and adventurous children. These fledglings, all entrusted with more money than guidance, soon fell in with the spirit of the Flapper Age. R.J. left them to a life of aimless travel, cafe'-society dissipation, extravagance, drink and general hell-raising-with a good bit of philanthropy eventually thrown into the bargain.

One of the favorite diversions of the younger son Smith, before his untimely end on that July night in 1932, was to potshot at the Reynolda chandeliers with the same Magnum pistol that killed him. Having wooed a famous chanteuse, Libby Holman, in a sulky puppy-love courtship, he was in the habit of threatening suicide. It was never ruled out. The coroner's jury hinted at Miss Holman's culpability, though she was never brought to trial.

R.J.'s elder son, R.J. Jr. (Dick) survived an equally wild but longer youth to marry four times, serve as a naval officer in World War II and as mayor of Winston-Salem-and as sometime national treasurer of the Democratic Party, to which the Reynoldses were long the most generous contributors. Dick Reynolds was, in fact, the financial angel of Harry Truman's last-minute comeback in the election of 1948; and not long after the election the IRS generously ruled that he might deduct from that year's income tax liabilities as a "non-business bad debt" his uncollected loans to the Democratic National Committee. It was all a bit irregular, but the secret was kept for years. Dick Reynolds's equally colorful later years were devoted to the embellishment of various princely establishments, including his feudal barony at Sapelo Island, Ga. His miscellany of sons included Patrick, the actor and co-author of this account. Patrick's poignant recollection of his boyish efforts to befriend his distant, sickly and isolated father, prematurely wasted by his dissipations and infirmities, are among the frequent blue notes of The Gilded Leaf.

The Reynoldses-the tobacco branch, anyway-were marked in later generations by the unfocused, chaotic lives that sometimes come with unearned wealth. But even when they were part-time playboys (and girls), wastrels and eccentrics, the Reynoldses had a sense of civic obligation and (in their sometimes strange fashion) of social responsibility.

After an artless beginning, featuring a bit of potted southern social history, The Gilded Leaf quickly builds speed and interest and becomes an absorbing story of fortune and misfortune-half Forsyte Saga, one might say, and half Octopus. In its latest incarnation, as RJR Nabisco, the old family firm recently inspired the most extravagant of all the great bidding wars of the corporate takeover era. But when that happened in late 1988, Patrick Reynolds had sold his shares and taken to the public forum as a militant foe of smoking. Some of his kin are irked, were are told. But from what Patrick Reynolds and his collaborator tell us of his grandfather, the old man must be ruminating his celestial cud of Brown Mule and musing that the maverick strain in the family still breeds true.-Edwin M. Yoder Jr. is a columnist for The Washington Post Writers Group.

PHOTO-MUG,,From The Book Caption: Richard Joshua Reynolds, early 1880s

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TRIBUNE BOOKS
Nonfiction.

Nicotine misfits The very wayward ways of the R. J. Reynolds tobacco dynasty

Reviewed by Robert Ivan Bell, author of "You Can't Win at OfficePolitics" and other books on corporate intrigue.
866 words
23 April 1989
Chicago Tribune
FINAL EDITION; C
3

The Gilded Leaf By Patrick Reynolds and Tom Schachtman Little Brown, 353 pages, $19.95

`In the 19th Century, chewing tobacco was so much a feature of the American scene that foreign observers called the United States the land of the moving jaw, and one man thought we should replace our national symbol, the eagle, with the spittoon," write the authors of this fascinating book. They describe in stunning detail how one 19th-Century robber baron, R. J. Reynolds-portrayed here as a hard drinking, womanizing, charming rogue-tapped America's nicotine addiction to amass a staggering fortune, and how his son, Dick, flitted through "a life spent as the quintessential heir."

Although coauthored by an anti-smoking advocate who happens to be one of R. J. Reynolds' grandsons, this anecdotally told family chronicle isn't really about how smoking is bad for you. It's about how inherited money is bad for you if it doesn't come with strong fatherly guidance.

R. J. had a stern but generous father, who gave him most of his initial stake, "an amount equivalent to all the taxes paid by the inhabitants of Patrick County for an entire year." The money had been sweated from the sufferings of tenant farmers, slaves until the end of the Civil War. Then R. J. used this stake to enslave millions more to nicotine.

Hard working, he slept above his factory in Winston, N. C., gambled on anything, seduced countless women who worked for him and was heralded for producing chewing tobacco fundamentally different from the competition's; R. J.'s contained no horse manure. By 1890 he had become one of the richest men in the state

While publicly crusading against Buck Duke's widely hated American Tobacco Co. trust, he secretly sold two-thirds of his shares to Duke for $3 million and took regular train trips to New York to receive his orders. When the government broke up the trust, calling it "rich, powerful, conspicuous and guilty," R. J. got his company back. His stupendous wealth then came from Prince Albert smoking tobacco and Camels cigarettes.

At age 54, R. J. married his cousin once removed and 30 years younger. She was left with their four young children when he died of pancreatic cancer in 1918. Her death six years later left R. J.'s heirs with no effective parental supervision. They roared their way into the late '20s and '30s.

The two daughters eventually settled down, but the two boys dissipated their lives in legendary style, which the rest of the book chronicles. The younger son, Smith, had a near-literal "Cannon" wedding. Textile tycoon Joe Cannon forced the marriage at gun point after he found his daughter and teenager Smith in intimate embrace on the living room couch. When they divorced, Smith explained, "she likes big parties (and) I like small parties." His next marriage, to actress Libby Holman, ended with a bullet in his head one hot night in July, 1932, at the family estate, Reynolda.

The description of those events are too good to miss. Libby wore a "diaphanous nightgown" when she testified at the coroner's inquest, held in the library at Reynolda. As she entered the elegant room, she "went out of her way to pause in front of a stream of sunlight from a window. Various reporters commented on the wonder of her well-exposed figure."

Libby and a friend of Smith's believed to be her lover were later indicted for premeditated murder. But the district attorney dropped the charges after elder son Dick intervened. He himself had recently served time in England for killing a motorcyclist in a hit-and-run drunk driving accident.

Dick was not a total wastrel. He became treasurer of the Democratic National Committee, was elected mayor of Winston-Salem and was decorated for action in the Pacific during World War II. But he also had four marriages and four divorces, including two from his third wife.

Dick became the center of international society scandal. In one incident at the famed nightclub El Morocco he pulled a knife on notorious playboy Porfirio Rubirosa, who had been having a flagrant affair with Dick's second wife.

Perhaps Dick smoked too many Camels. He suffered from emphysema, becoming a Howard Hughes-style recluse living in Switzerland. He died there in 1964. In a handwritten final will, he left his entire estate to his current wife, in effect cutting out his six sons. Before that, he had pretty much ignored them anyway, and each, including co-author Patrick, 40, still pocketed $2.5 million from their grandmother's estate.

Although Patrick comes across as a confused rich kid, "both blessed and cursed" by his money, his book is anything but confusing. In fact, it's illuminating.

CAPTION:

PHOTO: In 1950, R. J. Reynolds, Jr. (above) seemed on good terms with his second wife, Marianne. His sons (below) gather at a 1959 wedding.

PHOTOS 2

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LIFESTYLE

BITTER LEGACY OF AN EMPIRE

By Diane Harris, Record Staff Writer
698 words
8 May 1989
The Record, Northern New Jersey
All Editions.=.Four Star P. Two Star. One Star
b03

Patrick Reynolds is fuming mad about what he says cigarettes did to his family. And he is even madder about what his family did to him. So mad, in fact, he has written a scathing, no-holds-barred book about the family's scandalous exploits.

"I wrote this book to try to get closer to my father and to work through the anger and sadness I've felt about never knowing him," says Reynolds. He's the son of Richard Reynolds Jr. and grandson of Richard Joshua "R. J." Reynolds, founder of one of the country's most powerful tobacco empires. He and his five brothers were disinherited by their father, who died in 1964 of emphysema caused by chain-smoking, Reynolds says. Two of Reynolds' aunts died of cancer-related illnesses, and R. J. died of pancreatic cancer caused, Reynolds says, by chewing tobacco.

"Cigarettes robbed me of my father," says Reynolds, who was in New York promoting "The Gilded Leaf" (Little, Brown and Company, $19.95). Reynolds, who had a pack-a-day habit himself from 1968 until 1984, has become one of the nation's most outspoken opponents of smoking. Last year, with a trust fund set up for him by his grandmother, he founded the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, a kit containing tapes narrated by self-help guru Dr. Wayne Dyer.

Reynolds' anti-smoking efforts have helped him make peace with the idea that his family "may have killed more people than Adolf Hitler and World War II combined," he says. But he says he wrote the book in an effort to come to terms with the rejection he felt after his father divorced his mother, actress Marianne O'Brien, in 1952.

Richard Reynolds left his estate to his fourth wife, a German woman named Annemarie Schmidt, and her daughter Irene, born 36 hours after his death.

Patrick spent his youth living the Hollywood high life cushioned by the $2.5 million trust fund left to him by his grandmother, a woman with both foresight and compassion. But in 1975 his anger crystallized, he said, on a visit to his father's estate at Sapelo, an island off the coast of Georgia. There, he says, stepmother Annemarie tried to sell him some of the family heirlooms, including a portrait of his father, a legacy he believed was rightfully his.

What Patrick Reynolds says he did inherit from his family was a lack of direction. Like his father, a notorious playboy during the Twenties, Reynolds felt no urgent need to earn a living or chart a course through life. He made a half-hearted attempt at acting, and his marriage to German socialite Regina Wahl failed after only 18 months.

In his book, Reynolds tells his family story from the late 1800s, when the lusty, hard-drinking R. J. began reaping huge profits from chewing tobacco and Camel cigarettes, to 1988, when the company became part of the RJR Nabisco Co. Along the way come the stories of R. J.'s wife Katherine who, after his death, married a younger man and turned the care of the children over to guardians and nannies; of an uncle, Smith, who after a brief marriage to heiress Anne Cannon (daughter of James W. Cannon, founder of Cannon Mills) married torch singer Libby Holman, a bisexual and bon vivant who was charged with murder when Smith died of a bullet wound to his head 18 months later; and of brother Zach, a Sixties flower child who owned the world's largest collection of motorcycles, kept a coffin in a secret chamber in his home, and died mysteriously in a small plane crash.

Needless to say, the surviving members of the Reynolds clan are not entirely happy with the book. One of his cousins, whose name Reynolds will not disclose, has threatened litigation. But Patrick Reynolds, for the moment at least, seems to have found a purpose. "I'm happy with what I'm doing," he says. "I've got a tale to tell, and I'm here to tell it."

PHOTO - PATRICK REYNOLDS, "A tale to tell"

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Two Family Stories Stretch the Truth Honest Insight In Short Supply In `Jackie,' `Leaf'

STAFF
1,050 words
14 May 1989
Atlanta Journal and Constitution
L/10

(Copyright 1989 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Don O'Briant Book Editor American readers are a hypocritical lot. They complain loudly about the scandalous biographies of the rich and famous every time one is published, then immediately rush to the bookstores to send the latest volume soaring onto the best-seller lists. The latest two offerings in the voyeuristic genre contain enough sex and violence to keep beach readers sizzling all summer. In the first, "A Woman Named Jackie," C. David Heymann, the author of biographies of Barbara Hutton ("Poor Little Rich Girl") and Ezra Pound ("Ezra Pound: The Last Rower"), focuses on the life and bad times of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis. Drawing upon newly released FBI and CIA files and interviews with 825 friends and acquaintances of Mrs. Onassis, Mr. Heymann paints an uneven portrait of a woman riddled with insecurity. Much of this we already know from reading other Jackie biographies and from glancing at the supermarket tabloids while waiting in the express checkout line.

The first third of the book is intriguing and professionally done. Mr. Heymann describes Jackie's childhood, her strong attachment to her father, "Black Jack" Bouvier, and the devastation of her parents' divorce when she was 8. Jackie's intense devotion to her father, a world-class womanizer, shaped her future relationships with men as well. She found she was only attracted to men she considered "dangerous," like her father. That is one reason, Mr. Heymann says, that she tolerated John Kennedy's affairs. She was disturbed by them, but she was also intrigued. The book goes downhill quickly after the early section. Mr. Heymann's tone becomes more sarcastic as he writes about Mrs. Kennedy's distaste for campaigning, her strained relations with the press during the White House years and the mutual animosity between her and others in the Kennedy clan. The middle portion of the book is devoted almost entirely to a litany of JFK's affairs, with various friends and former employees describing the liaisons in detail. There are few surprises, other than gossipy revelations about JFK's use of amphetamines and more details about his affair with Marilyn Monroe. (She actually thought JFK was going to divorce Jackie and install her as first lady.) Mr. Heymann handles the section on the assassination and funeral with great care, revealing Mrs. Kennedy at her best and brightest as the heroic widow. And he chronicles her fall from grace when she married Aristotle Onassis. When told she would fall from the public pedestal, she replied, "It's cold up there." It is still difficult for many Americans to resolve their conflicting feelings about Jackie Kennedy Onassis. The woman they remember in the pink wool bloodstained suit immediately after the assassination and the jet-setting wife of Aristotle Onassis are worlds apart. Mr. Heymann does little to solve the enigma in 631 pages. "One question remains," he writes. "What is Jackie really like? And the answer is: We may never truly know." "The Gilded Leaf," co-authored by Patrick Reynolds, a grandson of the founding father, is another fascinating saga of an American family touched by fortune and tragedy. Imagine two brothers from a modest Virginia tobacco plantation who set off after the Civil War to make their fortunes. Both begin manufacturing tobacco, but the older brother, Abram, soon diversifies into metals and other fields. The younger brother, R.J., builds a fortune on cigarettes and dies of cancer in 1918. His sons, left in the care of family retainers, drift through a succession of scandals - infidelities, murder, suicide and alcoholism. R.J. Reynolds is portrayed as a gambling womanizer who parlayed a modest stake into a tobacco fortune by 1890. At the age of 54, R.J. married a cousin who was 30 years younger. He died of pancreatic cancer in 1918, and she died six years later, leaving their two daughters and two sons to spend the fortune pretty much as they pleased. One son, Smith, was forced at gunpoint to marry Anne Cannon, the daughter of textile tycoon Joe Cannon, after the father found his daughter and the teenage Smith making love on the living room couch. After his divorce ("She likes big parties, and I like small parties," he explained), he became involved with Libby Holman, a notorious actress whose charms were enhanced for many by her bisexuality and constant flirtation. Less than a year after the marriage, he was found dead of a gunshot wound in the head. He was 20. His wife and a male friend claimed it had been suicide, but there was evidence to the contrary. Both were indicted for first-degree murder, but the case was ultimately dropped. Meanwhile, the other son, Dick, became a war hero, treasurer of the Democratic NationalCommittee and mayor of Winston-Salem. But his private life was almost as scandalous as his brother's. His first three marriages ended in violent drunken brawls after years of infidelity and drinking. He disinherited his six sons to prevent the family millions from tainting their lives and died mysteriously in Switzerland. Suffering from emphysema, he had become a recluse. A handwritten will left his entire estate to his wife, who, 36 hours after his death, gave birth to a daughter of dubious paternity. The rest of the book focuses on the divergent paths of two of Dick's sons, Zach, an eccentric who rode motorcycles, ingested large amounts of drugs and kept a coffin in a secret chamber in his home. His death in the crash of a small plane was thought to have been suicide. Patrick, the author, apparently saw the light just in time, altering his lifestyle from that of a jet-setting actor to one of America's staunchest anti-tobacco spokesmen. Entertaining and intriguing, this family chronicle should be stamped with the warning: "Caution: Inherited Wealth May Be Hazardous to Your Health." A Woman Named Jackie: An Intimate Biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis. C. David Heymann. Lyle Stuart, $21.95.

The Gilded Leaf. Patrick Reynolds and Tom Schachtman. Little Brown, $19.95.

Notes: Photo: Jacqueline Kennedy with the president and their children during a visit to Hyannisport. Photo: mug shot of R.J. Reynolds

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Orange County Life; 9; LIFE Desk
BOOKS & AUTHORS

The Sun Also Rises, but as it Sets Today Hemingway Fans Will Gather in Laguna

DENNIS McLELLAN
Times Staff Writer
781 words
20 May 1989
Los Angeles Times
Orange County
8

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1989 All Rights Reserved)

Upchurch-Brown Booksellers in Laguna Beach will host a "Hemingway Fest" today and Sunday, with readings and lectures by Hemingway scholars and aficionados.

Round Table-Biographer A. Scott Berg ("Goldwyn"), anti-smoking spokesman and tobacco heir Patrick Reynolds ("The Gilded Leaf") and novelist Stephen Birmingham ("Shades of Fortune") will speak at the Round Table West luncheon meeting at noon Tuesday at the Balboa Bay Club, 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. Cost: $25. For reservations, call (714) 548-1447.

 

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Los Angeles Times Magazine; Times Magazine Desk
COMING SOON

Sneak Previews of Forthcoming Books Not Like Father

PATRICK REYNOLDS; TOM SHACHTMAN
1,048 words
21 May 1989
Los Angeles Times
Home
8A

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1989 All Rights Reserved)

`Patrick was depressed when he returned to Hollywood. In a journal, he poured out what he knew of his father. He tried to stop loathing Dick and struggled to understand him.' From "The Gilded Leaf-Triumph, Tragedy, and Tobacco: Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Family and Fortune," to be published this month by Little, Brown and Co. This excerpt describes the period before tobacco heir Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R.J. Reynolds, became an anti-smoking advocate.

BY THE TIME of the Reynolds family reunion, Patrick was a young film maker. He bore the family name but only a small fraction of the money; he was Dick's son but had been disinherited, and so, along with his brothers, was somewhat ostracized at this gathering. Patrick lifted his movie camera and recorded the reunion; it was a wonderful way to be present and distanced at the same time.

Back in Hollywood, without the discipline of being forced to earn his own living, Reynolds went after his career goal inefficiently. He didn't seek the sort of jobs other aspiring film makers wanted, such as working as assistants in production companies. Instead, he attended film festivals around the world and took courses at UCLA and then at USC. He spent endless hours in an editing room perfecting his own short films.

As did many heirs, he tried to surpass his father by attempting to make a lot of money all at once. He plunged $400,000 into silver bullion and had the satisfaction of seeing the price rise. But he lost money on a prototype electric car, a mobile phone in a briefcase, a bank in the Bahamas, an executive-search company. Often he agreed to deals with a handshake, wrote checks to business partners without consulting attorneys and in other ways fell victim to associates whose enthusiasm far outweighed their credentials.

He was delighted when his old mentor, Albert Johnson, invited him to join other San Francisco Film Festival people in a tour of the Soviet Union. They met Soviet film stars and directors. To Reynolds, it was a revelation that in a communist country, where all were supposed to be equal, a few lived more comfortably than most. Perhaps it was the natural order of things that some were more fortunate than others.

Believing that, he concluded that he wasn't a bad (or a good) person for having a lot when others had very little; it was just the luck of the draw. He began to be more relaxed about his inherited wealth and decided there was nothing wrong with spending some of his money on himself. He rented a hilltop castle-estate in the Hollywood Hills. Wolf's Lair was grand and fake at the same time-many rooms, a hideaway pool, a panoramic view of the Los Angeles Basin, and another over the Lake Hollywood reservoir.

Actress Shelley Duvall was researching a role in Robert Altman's "Nashville" when Reynolds met her at the Starwood on Santa Monica Boulevard. Soon she moved into Wolf's Lair.

While visiting Duvall on the set of "Nashville," Reynolds was cast by Altman in a walk-on. Being a film director now seemed to be an unattainable goal; acting was more approachable.

The bit in Altman's movie led to a speaking role in a television production of "Bernice Bobs Her Hair," in which Duvall starred. After that production had concluded, Reynolds was scheduled to act in Altman's "Buffalo Bill and the Indians" when a letter from his aunt arrived. The missive announced that the Sapelo Island Research Foundation was offering to sell the South End mansion's furnishings to the brothers before holding a general auction. Reynolds was insulted by being asked to bid on what he believed should have been part of his inheritance. He decided that attending might be his last opportunity to see Sapelo.

The magnificence and emptiness of Sapelo, conjuring up both the wonderful and the terrible scenes that had occurred there, produced in Reynolds a profound sadness. He was quite depressed when he returned to Hollywood. In a journal, he poured out all that he knew of his father's and family's life. The writing was therapy. In the course of it, Patrick tried to stop loathing Dick and struggled to understand him: "Ignoring his children was only part of (Dick's) larger pattern. To successfully cope with the magnitude of his endowments in wealth, genius and physical stamina, he would have needed an equally extreme self-discipline, which he was never inspired or did not choose to cultivate." Patrick wrote that he himself hoped to have that discipline.

He decided to put the past behind him forever, to bury and forget it. He had his own future in films on which to concentrate. He was cast in a new musical by the authors of "Hair" and went to rehearse with it in New York; meanwhile, Duvall was on location making another film. At the end of one long-distance call, the relationship was over. The musical closed, too, after three performances. Reynolds returned to Wolf's Lair; without Duvall, the mansion seemed empty. He found an even more majestic estate, in Holmby Hills. This was Brooklawn, built in the 1920s by one of the founders of 20th Century Fox, Winifred Sheehan. It had enormous public rooms with 14-foot ceilings; there was a ballroom with a balcony. Its dimensions and amenities seemed perfect for the life Reynolds believed he had been cheated out of-the style of his father, which he wanted desperately to understand.

He gave two large parties a year, held private acting workshops in the ballroom, dated actresses and models. With a partner, he optioned some screenplays and properties but was not able to persuade the studios to put any of them into production. At what seemed to him to be the last moment, he lost many potential starring roles in films. The beauty of Brooklawn was a constant source of pleasure, but at times its enormous, empty rooms only amplified Reynolds' growing feelings of failure and despair. Copyright 1989 by Patrick Reynolds.

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FEATURES

Tobacco Road Tales: Reynolds Heir Details Family's Misfortunes

Don O'Briant Staff Writer
STAFF
914 words
22 May 1989
Atlanta Journal; Atlanta Constitution
D/01

(Copyright 1989 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

When Patrick Reynolds was watching "Dynasty" a few years ago, it occurred to him that this was tame stuff compared to the escapades of his family.

After all, murder, suicide, alcoholism, adultery, scandalous divorces and enormous wealth were commonplace among certain members of the R.J. Reynolds clan in North Carolina.

Patrick Reynolds's grandfather, R.J. Sr., was a gambling, womanizing, savvy entrepreneur who turned a modest chewing-tobacco company into an empire; his father was a dashing playboy who could have come straight out of an F. Scott Fitzgerald novel.

With his acting career stalled (in eight years, he appeared in "Nashville" and a few other films, but he never landed a major role), Patrick Reynolds decided to write a book that would drag the family linen out for public display.

This was not a malicious decision, the 40-year-old actor said while in Atlanta promoting "The Gilded Leaf: Triumph, Tragedy and Tobacco, Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Family and Fortune" (Little, Brown, $17.95). He simply wanted to learn more about the father who had disinherited him.

The quest began several years ago during a visit to Sapelo Island, the family's palatial estate off the Georgia coast. Patrick Reynolds had visited the island as a child but not very often.

"I only met my father on five or six occasions after my parents' divorce when I was 3, and he died when I was only 15," Mr. Reynolds said. "I had a lot of anger toward my father. I didn't understand him."

Mr. Reynolds had good reason to be angry. When his father, R.J. Jr., died in 1964, he left his $25 million estate to his fourth wife and nothing to his six sons.

The opulence of Sapelo only made him more bitter, Mr. Reynolds said. "I saw the magnificence I had been disinherited of, and it stung like a slap in the face."

Drawing upon interviews with family and friends and thousands of pages of documents, Mr. Reynolds uncovered a wealth of information about the family's fortune and misfortune.

In "The Gilded Leaf," he focuses on three generations of the Reynolds family, beginning with the shrewd dealings of R.J. Sr. to break up the American Tobacco Co. monopoly of North Carolina's Duke brothers.

A bachelor until well into his 50s, the elder Reynolds married his younger (by more than two decades) cousin, Katharine Smith, and produced four children.

When R.J. Sr. and his wife died within six years of each other (in 1918 and 1924), the children were left with too little supervision and too much money, according to Patrick Reynolds. Smith, the younger son, met an untimely death on a July night in 1932. His wife, actress Libby Holman, and a male friend were charged with murder, but the charges were dropped to keep unpleasant details of Smith's sexual activities from becoming public.

The other son, R.J. "Dick" Jr., lived the life of a playboy, buying yachts, taking lavish vacations and pursuing women. He became the center of a scandal at the El Morocco nightclub when he pulled a knife on international playboy Porfiro Rubriosa. Mr. Rubriosa, it seems, had been having an affair with Dick Reynolds's second wife. An alcoholic chain- smoker, he married four times and spent millions on three divorces.

But there was another side to Dick Reynolds. A decorated Navy pilot during World War II, he made a name for himself as treasurer of the National Democratic Party when he financed Harry Truman's come-from- behind victory in 1948. He later was elected mayor of Winston-Salem, N.C.

When he died as a virtual recluse in Switzerland, he left nine wills, including a handwritten final version that gave everything to his fourth wife, Annemarie. Since his three earlier wives had received substantial settlements, the sons were pressured into signing an agreement not to contest the will in return for $1 million each. Patrick and his brothers had been left $2.5 million each from their grandmother's estate, so none was in danger of poverty.

No heroes are in "The Gilded Leaf," not even the author. "I'm the least heroic of all," Patrick Reynolds said. "I write about all my warts, my hippie days at Berkeley, my wasted youth." Once a pack-a-day smoker, Mr. Reynolds now is a militant non-smoker who has testified before congressional committees about the evils of tobacco.

"My grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, chewed tobacco and died of cancer. My father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., smoked heavily and died of emphysema. My mother smoked and got emphysema and heart disease. Two of my aunts, also heavy smokers, died of emphysema and cancer," he said.

Mr. Reynolds said he is not bothered by charges that he is biting the hand that feeds him. "If the hand that feeds me is the tobacco industry, then that hand has killed millions of people."

Notes: photo: R.J. Reynolds Jr. left his $25 million estate to his fourth wife and nothing to his six sons, pictured in 1959. They are, from left in front: Patrick and Michael; back row from left: Josh, Will, Zach and John. photo: Patrick Reynolds photo: R.J. Reynolds Jr. and his second wife, former starlet Marianne O'Brien - Patrick Reynold's parents - are pictured circa 1950.

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MONEY

`Gilded Leaf'; Anemic tale of tobacco's first family

Martha T. Moore
365 words
23 May 1989
USA Today
FINAL
05B

The Gilded Leaf: Triumph, Tragedy, and Tobacco By Patrick Reynolds and Tom Shachtman Little, Brown. 353 pp. $19.95

Anyone who has visited Winston-Salem, N.C., has been struck by the influence the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company (now RJR Nabisco Inc.) has had on the town. In The Gilded Leaf, R.J. Reynolds' grandson - anti-smoking activist Patrick Reynolds - writes about the impact of the company on the family that founded it. Admittedly written to exorcise personal demons acquired growing up as a Reynolds, it's a familiar story of too much money and too little love.

The first and more interesting part of the book chronicles the making of the company. Born in 1850, Richard Joshua Reynolds started by making chewing tobacco with his father in Rock Springs, Va. After he struck out on his own - armed with the family ``Joshua coin,'' a lucky gold piece - he followed the market into smoking tobacco. First came the hugely popular Prince Albert brand, then Camel cigarettes, introduced with the first ``teaser'' ads - showing the camel but not identifying the product. Reynolds even took on James B. ``Buck'' Duke and the tobacco monopoly by joining, then beating, them.

After R.J.'s death in 1918, the story turns to his children: sons Richard Jr., (the author's father), then 12 years old; Smith; and daughters Nancy and Mary. The heirs inherited R.J.'s money - $11 million - but not, apparently, his ambition or discipline. A classic Jazz Age character, Smith drank, flew planes and chased showgirls. He married torch singer Libby Holman, then shot himself during a house party. Or was he murdered? Holman was indicted for the murder but never tried. Dick dabbled in aviation, yachting, politics --and marriage. He took four wives and fathered six boys, none of whom he bothered to know and whom he disinherited, and a girl, born the day after his death in 1964.

Unfortunately, this soap-operatic plot reads less compellingly than it sounds. Reading about dissolute lives can be as enervating as living them.

PHOTO;b/w(R,book cover,The Gilded Leaf,O)

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FEATURES

R.J. Reynolds Clan Is Still Fascinating

Celestine Sibley
STAFF
684 words
24 May 1989
Atlanta Journal; Atlanta Constitution
C/01

(Copyright 1989 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Gossipy biographies about the shenanigans of the rich and stylish don't interest me much, but I wouldn't have missed reading "The Gilded Leaf," the run-down on the R.J. Reynolds family, for anything. Written by Dick Reynolds's son, Patrick, and Tom Shachtman, a New York journalist, it was discussed in detail the other day in book editor Don O'Briant's interview with young Reynolds.

Right away, I had to grab it up to see how it dealt with the $7 million Reynolds divorce case, which I covered in Darien, Ga., back in the early 1960s. Remembrance is capricious, and our newspapers did not pay much attention to divorce squabbles in those days. But where $7 million and the multimillionaire high-liver and philanthropist Dick Reynolds, squire of Sapelo Island, were involved, it was news.

In those pre-expressway days, Gordon Roberts, the Journal reporter, and I had to sacrifice much of our Sundays at home to make the drive to Darien. But once there, it was a right jolly assignment. We stayed at a motel run by a delightful couple who grew strawberries in the back yard and surprised us with sumptuous strawberry shortcakes when our stint at the courthouse was over each day. Telephones were scarce, and we had to take turns using the one in the motel office, where the proprietors had a noisy myna bird who interrupted dictation to the office by screeching "Hell-ooh, babee!" and doing wolf whistles every few minutes.

Patrick Reynolds concentrates on the strategy of E. Smythe Gambrell, the Atlanta lawyer who succeeded Louis Nizer as Muriel Reynolds's attorney. But the ones Gordon and I enjoyed most were Mr. Gambrell's associates, James Hill and his brother Harold, now a state Supreme Court justice, and Robert Richardson, and Mr. Reynolds's lawyers, William Schroeder and Henry Troutman - Mister Henry, not for his courtroom appearances, but for the afterhours cocktail parties he held in his room.

Aaron Kravitch of Savannah and his daughter, now also a judge, started the divorce proceedings for the Reynoldses but withdrew or were fired before the second of the two trials. The high point of Mr. Gambrell's performance for many of us came when he, an Ivy league graduate who represented Eastern Airlines and was known to be wealthy and a little pompous, began his address to the jury by saying he was "just an old plow boy" himself.

One night, Paul Varner, Mr. Reynolds's McIntosh County lawyer, and Sheriff Tom Poppell invited Gordon and me to take a boat trip over to Sapelo Island to visit the magnificent home where the tobacco heir and, off and on, his four wives spent time. I now know from "The Gilded Leaf" that it was a rich and splendid mansion, but that night, the only thing that grabbed my attention was solid gold faucets in the bathrooms.

How could anybody, however rich, justify that? I wondered. "The Gilded Leaf" makes you wonder even more as you wade through pages of alcoholism and adultery, international yacht-buying and homebuilding. But the Reynoldses are an interesting family, not the least author Patrick, who is waging a battle against cigarette smoking. Dick was a New Dealer who entered politics and later served honorably in the Pacific in World War II.

Mrs. Reynolds, who dazzled me with her wardrobe trunks jammed with designer clothes and Cartier wares, lost her case before a McIntosh County jury, but after a year's negotiations, she received a settlement of $2 million plus with annual payments of $32,000 to her and her mother from a trust. Described in this book as a weirdo who toted a knife and practiced voodoo, she wasn't much weirder than her successor, German-born Annemarie Schmitt, who married Dick without letting the performing minister see his face and declined to let Dick's sons view his body after his death. To this day, there seems to be a little worrisome question about both marriage and death.

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Books THE BOOKS OF SUMMER: AN ALL-STAR LINEUP

JOAN WARNER
1,780 words
29 May 1989
Business Week
Pg. 14
Vol. Number 3107

Copyright 1989 McGraw-Hill, Inc.

Every Memorial Day you make yourself the same promise: This is the summer you'll catch up on all the important new books. And every Labor Day you pack up the handful of paperbacks you grabbed at the airport or train station, wishing you'd been better organized.

Here's help--BUSINESS WEEK's guide to the best of recent and coming releases. If your goal is to leave the office behind, there's a wide selection of books from sports to sociology. And if you like your reading ''relevant,'' there are entries proving that even another look at the budget deficit can be rewarding. HISTORY Forests have been decimated for books commemorating this year's bicentennial of the French Revolution, but two popular histories stand out from the crowd. Citizens by Harvard University's Simon Schama, already a best-seller, turns conventional accounts of the revolt upside down by concentrating on the viciousness of the mobs and the virtues of the monarchy they hated. Schama argues that far from clinging to an obsolete order, France's rulers had a passion for modernism. The changes they wrought contributed greatly to the political and social turmoil that ended in so much bloodshed. Closer to the mainstream, biographer Olivier Bernier's Words of Fire, Deeds of Blood uses portraits of key personalities on both sides of the conflict to bring the period to life. As the title suggests, this is a vivid reviewof populist rhetoric, the idealism ofenlightened statesmen, and the terrorist tactics of those they inflamed.

Rather read about America? The Crosswinds of Freedom is the final volume of James MacGregor Burns's trilogy, The American Experiment. He covers the years from Roosevelt through Reagan with encyclopedic but fast-paced political and social commentary. Burns approaches U. S. history as an ongoing struggle to balance autonomy against world influence and prosperity against fairness. In taking us from 1933 to the election of George Bush, the book gives a strong sense of drama in progress.

In American Genesis, sociologist Thomas P. Hughes has heartening words for those who fret about U. S. competitiveness. Hughes's theory is that the century from 1870 to 1970 was the most innovative in human history. And he doesn't think American ingenuity has faded a bit.

A different kind of chronicle is Lipstick Traces by journalist and music critic Greil Marcus. Subtitled A Secret History of the 20th Century, his illustrated annals of underground movements in politics and art are highly original. Marcus assembles the documents of cultural dissidence, from Dadaist poetry to rock lyrics, and comes up with the notion that there may be a kind of collective unconscious of revolt. Since he begins and ends with an outrageous British punk rock band, the Sex Pistols, the idea has considerable shock value. TRAVEL Armchair tourists can look forward to two magnificent trips. Time Among the Maya by Ronald Wright is an odyssey through Central America, where 5 million Maya still maintain much of their ancient culture. The Canadian author's adventures in Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico range from the mystical to the maudlin, and his prose has a gripping immediacy.

By contrast, Ian Buruma keeps the personal sentiment to a minimum in God's Dust: A Modern Asian Journey. Instead, he takes a hard look at the identity crises of eight Asian nations as they learn ''to be modern without losing their cultural sense of self.'' Buruma is politically sophisticated and well-versed in Asian history. His dispassionate picture may be an eye-opener to anyone who still romanticizes the ''exotic'' East. PEOPLE In place of blockbuster biographies are a number of books that use famous lives to typify a place and time. The Vanderbilt Era, by the prolific Louis Auchincloss, is a group portrait of the big spenders who dominated the American plutocracy in the decades before World War I. Similarly, in Otto the Magnificent, biographer John Kobler turns the life of Otto Kahn, the immigrant financier who became a high-powered investment banker and arts patron, into a saga of America's gilded age. If the U. S. had a renaissance, these were its Medicis; and the authors have a good time showing how a handful of families, hell-bent on leaving a mark with their money, sometimes succeeded all too well.

The fascinating Chaplin and American Culture, by film scholar Charles J. Maland, traces the love-hate relationship between a star and his public. Readers who are not daunted by Maland's academic approach will learn as much about American prejudices and politics as about the exile clown's persona on and off the screen. Another legendary figure, the enigmatic ''Lawrence of Arabia,'' speaks in his own voice in T. E. Lawrence: The Selected Letters, edited by Malcolm Brown. The 30-year correspondence is ILLUSTRATIONS BY ROGER ROTH likely to end much speculation about his military exploits, espionage career, and private life. Finally, the 18 profiles in John Hersey's Life Sketches add up to a journalistic tour de force. The personalities range from John F. Kennedy to an illiterate Army private, the dates from 1944 to 1988. Hersey based each sketch on personal encounters with his subjects, and the book represents a career's worth of new and brilliant writing. BASEBALL Baseball lovers are in for two treats. Journalist David Halberstam's Summer of '49 (BW--May 22), uses the 1949 Yankees-Red Sox playoffs as a starting point for a nostalgic tribute to postwar America. Baseball fans will enjoy his close coverage of the games, and Halberstam fans will relish his discussions of the days before sports and business became as closely entwined as they are now. The Progress of the Seasons by novelist George V. Higgins evokes the same period, but in a much more personal tone. Covering 40 years of Red Sox history, the book is a paean to Fenway Park and to the profound effect that baseball and its heroes once had on little boys--especially in Boston, but probably all over the country. SCIENCE Science buffs who weren't quite up to James Gleick's Chaos last year can indulge their passion for particles with a very accessible alternative. In Turbulent Mirror, authors John Briggs and F. David Peat show how random phenomena can suddenly turn predictable--and vice-versa. And they suggest that ''chaos theory'' might help explain events as diverse as the stock market crash of October, 1987, and persistent traffic jams.

For those more biologically inclined, Blueprints: Solving the Mystery of Evolution by Maitland A. Edey and Donald C. Johanson is a super-readable history of genetic theory, from Darwin to modern DNA research. The authors are famous for Lucy, the account of the 3 million-year-old hominid skeleton Johanson found in Ethiopia, and they know how to tell a story. BUSINESS Business books this season run the gamut from macroeconomics to management. From Robert Heilbroner and Peter Bernstein comes a slim volume, The Debt and the Deficit: False Alarms/Real Possibilities, that clears away much confusion and dispels many popular myths. If Americans are going to worry about living beyond their means, suggest the authors, they had better be worrying for the right reasons. No, deficits are not about to bring the economy tumbling down. In fact, they may continue to be engines of growth. But debt must be managed to be constructive, and this book is a primer on such responsible management. The Invisible Powers by John J. Clancy, a computer-industry veteran who now runs software startup Valisys, examines the images that companies use to describe their goals and strategies. Clancy draws on an unusual mix of material, much of it linguistic, to describe how corporations are perceived, how they motivate their employees, and how they approach problem-solving. Arguing that the metaphors currently in use are fast becoming obsolete, he urges business leaders to rethink corporate culture--or risk extinction.

Two first-person narratives take intimate looks at a couple of companies that have nothing in common except enormous wealth and clout. Inside IBM: A Personal Story by Jacques Maisonrouge is a cheerful account of the computer giant's global expansion, from the first non-American to serve on its board of directors. Maisonrouge's optimism is largely the result of his own success in the company, and even readers not particularly interested in IBM may be inspired by his story. Coming from the opposite direction is Patrick Reynolds' The Gilded Leaf: Triumph, Tragedy, and Tobacco. The antismoking black sheep of the R. J. Reynolds dynasty rips into his family with all the passion one would expect from a disinherited heir. Almost incidentally, he produces a lively corporate history that may make some folks at Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. wonder just what they have gotten themselves into.

Esquire columnist Stanley Bing may have the last word in summer business reading. His Biz Words, a paperback not much bigger than a memo pad, is a lexicon of corporate jargon that's really an ethics guide in disguise. Brief essays on such office practices as back-stabbing, passing the buck, and sexual harassment offer excellent advice. But Bing's book is better than wise--it's hilarious. FICTION The news in novels: John le Carre brings the superpower spy story into the age of glasnost in The Russia House. Complete with post-Cold War romance, this thriller suggests--without being in the least preachy--how dangerous it may be to hold on to meaningless stereotypes and unfounded mistrust. In Polar Star, Martin Cruz Smith's sequel to Gorky Park, a U. S.-Soviet fishing venture in the Bering Strait turns into a murder conspiracy that blurs the classic ideological lines. Detective Arkady is as cynicalas ever, always finding equal measures of stupidity and cunning on both sides of the Russian-American contest.An absorbing coming-of-age novel by John B. Schwartz, Bicycle Days, describes the adventures of a young man who spends a year working for a U. S. computer company in Tokyo.In trying to master Japanese manners, the hero winds up making more progress on the path to self-knowledgeand self-control than he possibly could have back home. And those who worry that they never read every word of War and Peace can assuage theirguilt with a new book of stories by Tolstoy's grandniece, Tatyana Tolstaya. Already much admired in the Soviet Union, she makes her U. S. literary debut with On the Golden Porch, a witty collection that is translated with style.

-- Assistant Copy Chief Warner is currently editing the Books section.

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News and Features

SMOKING BECOMES A DYING HABIT IN THE UNITED STATES

DEBORAH CAMERON
1,198 words
1 June 1989
Sydney Morning Herald
15

Copyright of John Fairfax Group Pty Ltd

TOBACCO smokers choked and gasped when they heard. Young Patrick Reynolds was a defector. Not only had an heir to the Camel cigarettes fortune kicked the habit, he had established the Foundation for a Smoke-Free America.

It was like Leo Schofield turning vegetarian or Bruce Ruxton becoming a pacifist, only worse. If there was one thing the smoking lobby had counted on it was the Reynolds family, especially the young ones. And young Pat had, at first, looked like a promising ally, doing the drawback at an early age and graduating to a pack-a-day habit.

But something went wrong. In 1986, after both his mother and his aunt died of smoking-related diseases, young Pat turned in his lighter and joined the increasingly vocal and dauntingly well organised US anti-smoking lobby. Since then he has given damaging evidence before a congressional committee inquiring into the tobacco industry and has gone on the lecture circuit.

Clearly, young Pat saw the writing on the wall. The years since he abandoned his tobacco-baron past have coincided with an across the-board decline in tobacco smoking in the United States, a vigorous new anti-smoking approach by local, State and Federal governments and a popular trend toward physical fitness.

In New York, last Saturday week, you could have bought an old advertising poster of a younger and impeccably air-brushed Ronald Reagan endorsing Chesterfield cigarettes. It was circa 1950, the hey-day of the US tobacco industry. In 1949 the cigarette companies had their best year, estimating that 44 per cent of adult Americans smoked. Now only 26.5 per cent of adult Americans smoke, most of them only after apologising or moving to a smokers'zone. It is expected that the figure will decline further, to about 20 per cent of adults, by the year 2000.

Dramatic losses have been suffered by tobacco companies in the past five years, though the first sign that fags were losing their fashionable appeal came more than 20 years ago when the US Surgeon-General reported the link between smoking and lung cancer.

The Surgeon-General had to wait a long time for complete vindication, but last year it came in a New York courtroom. A jury ordered a cigarette company to pay $US400,000 in damages to the husband of a woman who died of lung cancer at the age of 58. Her case against the company was that it had, by its sophisticated advertising, encouraged her to smoke without warning her of the consequences, even though it knew of cigarettes' potential to cause harm(health warnings on packs did not become mandatory until 1964).

While the tobacco companies thought the adverse finding would quickly fade from public consciousness, the anti-smoking bandwagon was rolling. Six months after the case, dozens of new lawsuits were pending and a major tobacco company, Philip Morris, diversified by buying Kraft - the makers of Vegemite and cheddar cheese slices - so reducing its dependence on cigarettes.

Now, faced with a declining market, tobacco companies are turning their attention to growth markets among poorer, less educated and less literate segments of the US population. In Los Angeles, public buses, the primary mode of transport for a large number of poor Hispanics, this year carried advertisements written in Spanish offering cut-price cartons of cigarettes by mail-order.

In the past week, there have been complaints about US tobacco companies'tactics in under-developed countries, including their efforts to have the health warnings erased from packets exported to the Third World from the US.

Although the tobacco companies deny following a deliberate marketing strategy, groups including the US Public Health Service, the Coalition on Smoking or Health and the American Medical Association have figures supporting the idea that smoking has increased among people with little formal education

According to the AMA, smoking declined between 1974 and 1985, but the fall was five times greater among those with university degrees than among those who dropped out of high school. Racial differences also tended to determine whether a person would be a smoker or not: in 1985, 35 per cent of blacks admitted to smoking, against 29 per cent of whites.

"Despite declining sales, the cigarette industry remains one of the most profitable and powerful businesses in America," the outgoing Surgeon-General, Dr Everett Koop, wrote last year. "It uses its vast economic strength to defend the promotion, sale and use of tobacco and to punish those who stand in its way."

In fact, as the times have got tougher, so have the cigarette and tobacco companies. It is almost impossible to make a tobacco company spokesman flinch at death statistics. Most will still argue there is no conclusive proof that tobacco smoke is any more harmful than air.

Late last year, in what was probably the most devilishly clever way to appeal to the free-market conscience of America, Philip Morris published a survey called "The American Smoker - An Economic Force". The findings, compiled from responses to a questionnaire in the quarterly Philip Morris Magazine, found that American smokers were patriotic and affluent. Although it did not go quite so far as to say that it was almost un-American not to smoke, it did say that "smokers lean toward American-made (products) and contribute significantly to every part of the US economy".

According to the survey, 24 per cent of smokers are in executive and professional occupations and about half of them use credit cards and often eat in restaurants. They had a combined income of $US1 trillion.

Once it had the survey results, Philip Morris scheduled advertisements in magazines and newspapers throughout the US proclaiming among other things: "Today, 21 million American smokers will go out to eat. That's a market you can sink your teeth into |" And in another advertisment aimed at the domestic aviation industry Philip Morris implored "Make room, America |", a jab at the airlines which have banned smoking on all flights of less than two hours or have banned smoking altogether.

While tobacco companies and smokers in NSW are wringing their hands about smoking bans in restaurants and other public places, the volume of debate in the US has subsided as more and more smokers say that they can "understand"the position of non-smokers.

There have been complaints by some restaurateurs in New York who, because of a city ordinance, must divide their premises into smoking and non-smoking sections, a sort of a green-line where hostilities cease.

Some restaurateurs say that they are faced with queues for the smoking section while the non-smoking section has vacant tables, but that appears to be an exaggeration. In fact, non-smokers are so comfortable with the new arrangements that any attempt to repeal them would doubtless meet a non-smoker's backlash. Most smokers also approve; they now sit with like-minded souls and no longer suffer the intrusion of withering looks and frantic fanning from nearby tables.

In the US at least, smokers and non-smokers have reached a firm, if somewhat hostile, truce.

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VARIETY

Few mourn `Beartown' cigarette-machine ban

Karin Winegar; Staff Writer
1,071 words
23 October 1989
Star-Tribune Newspaper of the Twin Cities Mpls.-St. Paul
METRO
01E

White Bear Lake is dampening the flames of teenage smokers. Many residents of "Beartown"- smokers and nonsmokers alike - think it's a good idea. Some are not so sure.

The city of 20,000 last week became the first in the country to ban cigarette vending machines. The City Council adopted on a 4-to-1 vote an ordinance requiring cigarette vendors to remove their machines from town by Jan. 7. There are 19 machines in the city.

At Kowalski's grocery store in White Bear Lake, manager Joe Van Dusartz hung notices about the new ordinance on the employee bulletin board. The checkout staff is instructed to ask for identification from anyone who looks younger than 18 who asks for cigarettes from checkout-counter racks.

"We're not expecting a great increase in the number of kids trying to buy cigarettes here after the ban goes into effect," said Van Dusartz. "But we've informed the cashiers to question them and make sure they have ID. I think the ban is a pretty good idea, because cigarettes are so habit-forming. It's just like having rules for alcohol. And they should be enforced: That's why they make rules."

White Bear Lake Council Member Bill Bennis, a former Deluxe Corporation manager, cast the only dissenting vote. "They were really not attacking the smoking problem," said Bennis, who quit smoking 17 years ago. "I don't see that removing the vending machines - half of which are in bars that restrict young people anyhow - will have an effect."

White Bear Lake resident Doreen Pollock said she thinks the new ban is terrific, just the same.

"Whenever I go to someplace like the White Bear bowling alley that has cigarette machines, boy, the kids are hot around it, and there's nobody around to check them," said Pollock, a salesperson for Dayton's. "Since I'm a nonsmoker and don't care to be around people that smoke, that grates me. I am proud that we're trying this."

Twin City Vending in nearby Maplewood will be removing three or four machines from White Bear Lake, said company vice president Bob Ambler.

"I understand the purpose of the ordinance and agree wholeheartedly with making it more difficult for underage people to smoke," said Ambler. "The only problem I have with it is that some of the businesses where we have machines are completely private: You have to get by a secure area to get in. And a machine will still be illegal in that business."

Ambler said the White Bear Lake ordinance came as no surprise. "A number of companies in the metro area have asked us to remove machines," he said. "But the cigarettes are a very small part of our volume (of vending), and we see it as just a convenience to customers."

Since the ordinance was passed, White Bear Lake city offices have been besieged with calls and letters of support and interest from Texas to the Pacific coast. The story has run on the Canadian Broadcasting Corp., Cable Network News in Georgia, Minnesota Public Radio, Market Week magazine, United Press International and Associated Press wire services.

"We're kind of surprised at the reaction, "said Sather. "It just didn't seem to be that much of a pioneering act. At that last council meeting the interesting thing was that the mayor and a lot of other smokers supported the ordinance. It was like an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, with people standing up and talking about how hard it is to quit and how addictive the stuff is. People said things like, `I smoke, but I'm not proud of it.'

"And everyone pretty much agreed that since most studies show kids get started smoking at 12 or 14, the ban just helps them reach an age where they could make a better decision." Said Bennis, "I think there's some well-intentioned hypocrites out there; if they are sincere, they shouldn't shake nicotine-stained fingers at kids. Merchants could take cigarettes out of their businesses.

"Kids are innovative, and putting a ban sends a signal that it's forbidden fruit. Kids tell me they will go to Maplewood Mall, Mahtomedi and North St. Paul to get cigarettes. And some said they'd get them at home; they'd sneak them from their parents.

"The council calls this a first step, but what is the second and third step? Tobacco use is at the bottom of the list of health problems for kids: What about AIDS and drugs and abortion?"

Adults are modifying their smoking as well. To his knowledge, Sather said, no one has lit up a cigarette or pipe in the new White Bear Lake City Hall since it was built last year, and the Rotary and Lions Clubs both recently became smoke-free as well.

The ban is inspiring similar legislation in other towns and suburbs. Shoreview City Manager Dwight Johnson said City Attorney Jerry Filla was drafting an ordinance for a Nov. 6 meeting that would ban cigarette vending machines in public places (private businesses would still be permitted to have machines). According to Johnson, the suburb of 25,000 has licenses for 21 cigarette vending sites, about half of which may be for cigarette machines.

Sather, Johnson and others said the interest in similar bans may spread. Jerry Urban, city administrator for Vadnais Heights, a St. Paul suburb of 10,000, said a ban probably would be proposed for that suburb soon.

White Bear's ban is the latest attempt in a nationwide effort by the U.S. Surgeon General and others to educate smokers, tobacco chewers and would-be users about the potential harmful consequences of tobacco consumption. Some of them would like to restrict sales even further.

Patrick Reynolds, an heir to the R.J. Reynolds tobacco fortune, has testified in Congress in favor of a ban on cigarette advertising and is lobbying for a new law banning cigarette sales to anyone younger than 21. Reynolds, author of "The Gilded Leaf" ($17.95, Little, Brown) and founder of the Foundation for a Smokefree America, is scheduled to speak at a forum beginning at 7:30 p.m. today at the Radisson South Hotel, Bloomington. A former smoker, he saw his grandfather R.J. Reynolds, a lifelong smoker, die of emphysema.

ILLUSTRATION

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NEWS
Johnson & Eskola

Rough ride on Brooklyn Bridge knocks Spike out

Cheryl Johnson; Staff Writer; Eric Eskola
847 words
24 October 1989
Star-Tribune Newspaper of the Twin Cities Mpls.-St. Paul
METRO
02B

# Movie director Spike Lee got the golf cart ride of a lifetime from Minneapolis native Van Hayden. Hayden, working in New York as an intern on Lee's new film "Love Supreme," was turning the cart around on the Brooklyn Bridge when he crashed into a support cable. Lee fell out. "I thought my film career was over, to be honest," said Hayden. But after casting a wry glance Hayden's way, Lee laughed and got back in the cart. The internship is a dream come true for Hayden, who aspires to become a filmmaker. He's due back here in December - perhaps to make his family happy by completing a degree at the `U' before attending the NYU Film School.

# That's "Women Who Cook" member Kathy Jensen playing the saxophone in Patti LaBelle's new music video.

# We were expecting deft arguments from attorney Don Nichols, the local master of the DWI defense, as he represented the Vikings' Ray Lenn Berry on a charge of driving the wrong way on a one-way. Something like: "But if it'd please the court, my client was driving only one way." But the football player has chosen to pay a fine rather than go to court Wednesday. . . . Isn't it nice to see those Vikes tossing Nichols some nonimpaired-driving business for a change?

# Former Gopher, former San Francisco 49er Keith Fahnhorst is one of 100 men raising money for the "U" Women's Athletic Department scholarship fund.

# Just how small is Patrick Reynolds' (grandson of the tobacco company founder) investment in the Natus Corp. of Edina? About $5,000. Five other investors invested more. But Reynolds totally believes in the natural health and wellness products this company produces and markets in recyclable packaging. . . . In the Twin Cities to speak on behalf of Natus and the Patrick Reynolds Foundation for a Smokefree America, Reynolds applauded White Bear Lake for being first in the country to ban cigarette vending machines. # Starting today attorney Dave Bieging, longtime aide to U.S. Rep. Martin Sabo, is back in Washington for the Dorsey and Whitney firm.

# Timberwolves co-owner Marv Wolfenson gets hot oil treatments or haircuts maybe as often as every day at T.C. Hawkins Hair Styling in the Conservatory. About those hot oil massages, Wolfenson said, "It feels good. It doesn't do anything for my hair. All you have to do is look at my hair to know it doesn't do anything." . . . Last week Wolfenson was spied getting a tension-relieving hot oil massage the day after Rick Mahorn decided to shoot hoops and eat pasta in Italy. It's lonely at the top.

# New U of M university relations director Marcia Fluer speaks Sunday at a meeting of the Campaign Fund to Elect Republican Women. The afternoon tea, at Kathleen Ridder's Mendota Heights home, also may feature an appearance by former Miss America Gretchen Carlson, who has expressed an interest in Republican politics and who is invited.

# Albert Eisele, former press secretary to Walter Mondale, is opening his own lobbying firm in Washington, D.C.

# The King of Ole and Lena Jokes, Red Stangland, will be at the Little Wagon in Minneapolis today between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. along with two actors portraying the ever-popular Ole and Lena.

# Despite the Vikings' win over the Lions, Sunday was not a great day for nose tackle Henry Thomas. First he reinjured his shoulder. Then a wing-window on his pickup truck was punched out near the WCCO television studios in downtown Minneapolis, where Thomas was guesting on a postgame show. Thomas' radar-detection system is missing. We hear it took the police an hour to respond to the call.

# New Minnesota Orchestra concertmaster Jorja Fleezanis discourages talk that she's "splitting" time between Minnesota and San Francisco. Fleezanis says she's living FULL-TIME in Edina.

# Comedian-actor Joel Hodgson is busy. His hilarious but probably-not-for-everyone Mystery Theater 3000 has been picked up by HBO . . . He's starring in the upcoming KTCA-TV (Channel 2) comedy special "Land 'O Loons III" and he's completed a pilot called "Seriously Weird Magazine" for television distribution. He's also building his own independent production studio in a warehouse in Eden Prairie.

# If you've been stopped by four artistic-looking high schoolers you're not alone. They're members of a "Writing as Performance" class at Minneapolis North Community High School. David Hlavac, Laura Dreyer, Joshua Scrimshaw and Anita Kirchoff have been performing a short piece about dreams to unsuspecting pedestrians at such places as the State Capitol and the University of Minnesota. "We freaked out one woman. Now we introduce ourselves," says Hlavac.

# Introduce yourself to us at 332-TIPS.

Cheryl Johnson, who writes this column, is a staff writer for the Star Tribune. Eric Eskola, who contributes, is government correspondent for WCCO-AM radio and cohost of KTCA-TV's "Almanac."

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NEWS

City faces Catch-22 on smoking;Health vs. livelihood in N.C.

Sharen Shaw Johnson
586 words
6 November 1989
USA Today
FINAL
03A

GREENSBORO, N.C. - Lori Faley may be among the few in this health-obsessed decade to get anonymous death threats because she suggested banning smoking in supermarkets.

But then, Faley, suggested it here, where the Lorillard cigarette plant (Kent, Old Gold, Newport) provides 2,300 steady jobs.

She said something snapped the day she got trapped in line between smokers.

``I was seven months pregnant so I asked to put them out. ... The guy in back put his cigarette on the little stand where you write checks. ... I'd had it. I threw his cigarette to the ground'' and went home to start a campaign.

It culminates Tuesday, 19 months later, when Greensboro voters decide whether to limit public smoking.

Yes, say the local medical, dental, heart, lung and cancer associations. No, say the Chamber of Commerce, merchant and restaurant groups.

Smoking isn't ``something to be regulated by government,'' said Chamber President and non-smoker Thomas Osborne.

The debate is only the latest rumble in a land where tobacco has been king for centuries.

The six top tobacco-growing states have among the USA's weakest anti-smoking laws, a 1989 surgeon general's report said. None curbs smoking in restaurants or supermarkets. Only South Carolina bans smoking in elevators.

But it now is limited in most Nashville city offices, and it's banned in Tennessee Valley Authority offices.

Activist Anne Morrow Donley said, ``Forty-two percent of Virginians now are protected by (local) anti-smoking laws. ... We've come pretty far.''

So has the tobacco industry. Its lobbyists spent at least $110,088 --defeating a statewide Virginia law in 1989.

In comparison, industry spending in Greensboro is pocket change, but the battle there hasn't been ignored.

The Washington-based Tobacco Institute is coordinating efforts there, said R.J. Reynolds' Betsy Annese. ``Tobacco companies are ... contributing funds,'' she said.

It's justified, said Lorillard's Alexander Speer: ``There is no question in my mind'' national anti-smoking groups are helping the local effort.

Greensboro activists should be so fortunate, said spokesman David Hudgins: ``We're a loosely knit group of 15 to 20 - depends on who can get a baby sitter as to who shows up.''

The vote is expected to be close. No public polling has been done, and political observers say they can't predict which side will win.

What Speer and Hudgins do agree on is much of their state's history is written on tobacco leaves - golden ones:

- Tobacco money helped found Duke University.

- Lorillard and its workers pledged $250,000 toward United Way's 1989 $7 million goal.

- Last week - on the day ordinance backers brought rebel tobacco heir Patrick Reynolds to town to speak on their behalf - the RJR Nabisco Foundation said it would give $30 million to U.S. schools.

``Isn't the timing interesting,'' said nurse Carla Fried, a smoking-curbs leader.

The foundation said the project was planned for months. But Fried's reaction, like Speer's, shows the dilemma facing Greensboro voters.

Don Baskin listed the local benefits --from the tobacco industry. ``But ... the No. 1 killer in this country is tobacco.

``So I guess it comes down to what's more important: jobs or killing people? In America, that's a tough choice.'' CUTLINE:REYNOLDS: Tobacco heir backs foes of smoking

Accompanying story:Where tobacco is king

PHOTO;b/w,Brent Jones(FP,R.J. Reynolds,F1)

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L.A. LIFE

HOLLYWOOD FREEWAY

FRANK SWERTLOW
1,034 words
6 December 1989
Los Angeles Daily News
Valley
L16

Some people buy their wives a ring for Christmas. Others take them on vacation, maybe even buy them a car. But Hugh Hefner has found a present that has to take the cake over any given this year. The buzz going around Hollywood is that he bought a title for Kimberley Conrad, the Canadian model he married in July.

Some people buy their wives a ring for Christmas. Others take them on vacation, maybe even buy them a car. But Hugh Hefner has found a present that has to take the candle over any given this year. The buzz going around Hollywood is that he bought a title for Kimberley Conrad, the Canadian model he married in July.

That's right, a spy of ours who saw the check said the Playboy king paid $570,000 to make Mrs. Hefner a princess. And whom did he buy it from? You got it - none other than Prince Freddy von Anhalt, Zsa Zsa Gabor's consort and the man who purchased his own title from an aging, now deceased Austrian aristocrat.

Playboy spokesman Bill Farley confirmed that Hefner did, indeed, buy the title. But, he said, the correct figure was "in the low four figures, enough money to buy him a good suit."

Meanwhile, Bedroom No. 2 at the Playboy mansion in Holmby Hills has already been designated as a separate bedroom when the princess's heir or heiress is born. Whether it will be a boy or girl, nobody knows. "She hasn't been tested, and, frankly, there's some question whether she wants to know in advance," said Farley.

Chip shots

Talk about an unlikely friendship. Scott Baio showed up at Bar One on Sunset the other evening - and so did his pal Harry Hamlin. The connection? Hamlin is dating Baio's ex, actress-model Nicolette Sheridan. And the soon-to-be-divorced Hamlin just happened to have her right with him. "Scott took it like a champ," said our man at the scene. "But Harry has her now.". . .

The Christmas cheer at Universal has taken a sudden nose dive, with "Back to the Future Part II" plummeting 56 percent at the box office from its opening weekend to the next. They don't need to worry about "Future II": It's clearly heading for the $100 million mark. But what they do need to worry about is the dismal exit polls that indicate audiences might just not be flocking to "Future III," that's already in the can.

Movers and shakers

"He was very humble and very bright," said an insider who sat in with Todd Bridges during an "Entertainment Tonight" interview that will be broadcast tonight. But the insider told us even the camera crew was surprised when Bridges, speaking to reporters for the first time since his release from jail, significantly modified the tale he told during the trial for attempted manslaughter that ended up with his acquittal. "In his testimony in court, he said that he was so drugged out on crack, he couldn't remember doing it (shooting a man). They acquitted him. . . . Now, he said that he wasn't even there when the crime took place." Prosecuting attorney William Hodgman, a deputy district attorney for Los Angeles County, told "Entertainment Tonight" it was news to him.

Want to buy a bachelor? The Bel Age Hotel will host an auction for a date with a bachelor. The event, scheduled for 6 tonight and hosted by KPWR-FM's Jay Thomas, will "auction," among others, anti-smoking leader Patrick Reynolds, actor Don Yesso ("My Two Dads"), Beverly Hills Sports Cars' owner Jakob Schneider, actor Matthew Laurance ("Duet"), cinematographer Steven Shaw and "Entertainment Tonight" reporter Garrett Glaser. The event will benefit L'Hermitage Foundation, a fund that supports children's institutions.

"Prancer" delivered some unexpected holiday cheer Monday to a young leukemia-stricken girl in the City of Hope Hospital. Eight-year-old Alexandra McConnell, asked if she'd like to see a film while she was in the hospital, requested the current film about one of Santa's reindeer. The hospital passed her request along to the film's producers, Nelson Entertainment, which sent a videocassette of "Prancer" to the hospital, where Alexandra and 25 other patients in the pediatric ward watched it.

The long goodbye

Former "Today" show newscaster and anchor John Palmer told Hollywood Freeway his decision to leave NBC and take a job with King World "wasn't (based on) the money." Palmer, who had been scheduled to join a Miami TV station as anchorman and part-time NBC News correspondent covering Latin America, opted to join "Only Yesterday," King World's new info show, when he received an offer from former ABC News vice president Av Westin for the grand sum of $700,000 a year. "Both salaries were about the same," said Palmer.

What he said did influence his decision was a desire to be with his children and let his wife finish her graduate degree in American studies at Yale.

Palmer acknowledged that turmoil began at NBC last fall when Deborah Norville was brought in to replace him as the show's news reader, and he moved on to the pre-"Today" "NBC at Sunrise." "It was a very painful, troubling time for me, and now I am leaving," he said, adding that he bears no ill will toward Norville. "She was as stunned as I was about what happened. I think she is getting a bad rap for what happened between her and Jane Pauley."

But leaving NBC News after 26 years isn't easy, he admitted. "It's frightening," he said. "I don't look forward to the actual day I leave. It's very emotional. I walk down halls and say to myself that I won't be walking down them again. But what I did was the right thing to do."

Source: With reports from Stephen Galloway.

2 photos; Caption: photo: (1) Playboy publisher Hugh Hefner has reportedly purchased a royal title for his wife, just-call-me-princess Kimberley Conrad. (2) Nicolette Sheridan Heads turn at Bar One DAVID CRANE/DAILY NEWS

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PART-P; Late Final Desk

Nation R. J. Reynolds Grandson Kills Self

From Times Wire Services
119 words
24 January 1990
Los Angeles Times
P.M. Final
2

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1990 All Rights Reserved)

John Dillard Reynolds, grandson of former tobacco industry executive R. J. Reynolds, leaped to his death from a hotel's 11th-floor balcony outside Orlando, Fla., on Monday. He was 54.

Spokesmen for the Orange County Sheriff's Department said witnesses saw Reynolds climb the balcony and prepare to jump.

Patrick Reynolds, a half-brother whose book, "The Gilded Leaf," chronicles three generations of the Reynolds family, described John as a "dear, sweet, good" person who was the victim of a dysfunctional family.

He was the second of four sons born to Richard J. Reynolds Jr. and his first wife, Elizabeth Dillard Reynolds.

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NEWS
U.S.-WORLD DEATHS

U.S.-WORLD DEATHS

AP
403 words
25 January 1990
Tulsa World
FINAL HOME EDITION
A18

Grady Huffman

GRANBURY, Texas (AP) _ Grady Lee Huffman, the bad-luck "Baby Bandit" of the 1930s who was shot 17 times in three decades of crime, died Tuesday of cancer at age 72.

Huffman picked up the "Baby Bandit" nickname at age 18 in 1934 after leading Fort Worth police on a wild, bullet-punctuated chase. He was captured after being shot in the face, and was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

He tried to break out of prison in 1935, escaped for four days in 1942, broke out the next year and spent four months on the lam, and tried to escape again the same year. In 1944, he busted out and stayed free for 20 months.

In spite of his record, Huffman was one of 10 convicts pardoned in 1947 by outgoing Gov. Coke R. Stevenson. Huffman drew 399 years in prison. Huffman was paroled in 1967 and had led a quiet life since then.

Charley Eugene Johns

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) _ Charley Eugene Johns, who was governor of Florida for 15 months in the mid-1950s, died Tuesday after a lengthy illness at age 84.

Johns became governor in 1953 after the death of Gov. Daniel Thomas McCarty.

He was elected 14 times to the state Senate and once to the House, and served as Senate president in 1953. Johns was also the founder and former president of the Community State Bank in his hometown, where he also operated an insurance agency.

John Reynolds

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) _ John Dillard Reynolds, grandson of former tobacco industry executive R.J. Reynolds, fell to his death from a hotel's 11th-floor balcony outside Orlando, Fla., on Monday. He was 54.

Spokesmen for the Orange County Sheriff's Department said witnesses saw Reynolds climb the balcony and prepare to jump.

Patrick Reynolds, a half-brother whose book, "The Gilded Leaf," chronicles three generations of the Reynolds family, described John as a "dear, sweet, good" person who was the victim of a dysfunctional family. He was the second of four sons born to Richard J. Reynolds Jr. and his first wife, Elizabeth Dillard Reynolds.

William Metcalfe

WINNIPEG, Manitoba (AP) _ William H. Metcalfe, a pioneer Canadian journalist who was managing editor of the country's first co-operative newspaper and of the Winnipeg Free Press and Ottawa Journal, died Monday at age 83.

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ACCENT

Your name here // THE ORANGE COUNTY ROUNDUP OF THINGS YOU WANT TO KNOW

Nicole Brodeur:The Orange County Register
507 words
24 May 1990
The Orange County Register
EVENING
j01

Copyright (c) 1990 Bell & Howell Information and Learning Company. All rights reserved.

TIME'S A'WASTIN Hurry up. We still need a name for this column -- you'll get $50 if we pick yours -- but time is running out: We need your entries by Tuesday! Send them to Your Name Here, Accent section, The Orange County Register, PO Box 11626, Santa Ana, Calif. 92711, and be sure to include a phone number.

WHO'S OLDER Actress Priscilla Beaulieu Presley is 45 today. Singer Rosanne Cash is 35.

ON THIS DATE Drained of funds by his successful bid for re-election, Huntington Beach Councilman Jerry Matney on May 24, 1972, announced plans to raffle himself off.

Tickets -- which sold for 50 cents each, or three for $1 -- were emblazoned with "Your Own Public Servant for a Day . . . To Do Whatever You Require (As Long as It's Legal)."

"Reporters eagerly snapped them up," the Santa Ana Register reported May 24, 1972. "So did a handful of smirking city employees."

SIGN OF THE TIMES The only people choking at the Irvine Improv Comedy Club from now on will be the luckless, laughless comedians, because the club has instituted smoke-free shows on the first Wednesday of each month.

"A Comedy Show That Kicks Ash" debuted May 16 to rave reviews -- including kudos from Patrick Reynolds, grandson of cigarette czar RJ Reynolds and recent tobacco turncoat.

"We were a little worried because we thought some smokers who didn't know about it might come," said Improv spokeswoman Pam Felix. "But we got a lot of positive feedback."

The smokeless nights will continue June 6, July 11 (the club is closed July 4), Aug. 1 and so on. Felix was quick to extinguish a rumor that the smokeless nights were presented to keep Andrew Dice Clay, "the chain-smoking crown prince of vulgarity," out of the club.

SOUND OFF "One thing is bugging me. Why is it that every other year, when I get my license renewed, I have to pay to get my car smog-checked? It doesn't seem to clear up the smog. Where does this money go? Is there anyone to police it? I've read somewhere that there may be something new coming out to help the pollution made by cars. I suppose it will cost more. `Stick it to the little guy' seems to be the way. There has to be other things causing the smog. Let's look other than at cars."

Darrell Poulsen, Anaheim

WRITE US If you've moved to Orange County within the past year, this one's for you. Jot us a short note explaining what you like and/or dislike about Orange County. Or, tell us what you miss about where you last lived. Include your name, address and phone number. Send your entries to: Melting Pot, Accent section, The Orange County Register, PO Box 11626, Santa Ana, Calif. 92711.

WARP FACTOR:(cartoon)

COLOR PHOTO; Caption: Singer Bob Dylan is 49.

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MONEY

Standing under fire;Protest heats up against tobacco firms

Paul Wiseman;James Cox
1,493 words
25 May 1990
USA Today
FINAL
01B

Tobacco companies have already been banned from the airwaves, lambasted by the nation's top health officials and plagued by a growing intolerance for smoking.

Now, just as the 25-year-old social attack on the tobacco industry is reaching new heights, comes a new kind of an attack - an economic assault. Anti-smoking activists - borrowing tactics used for years against companies that did business in South Africa - are turning up the heat on big institutional shareholders to dump their tobacco stocks.

``We're going after the people who make it possible for tobacco companies to flourish: the shareholders,'' says Brad Krevor, executive director of the Boston-based Tobacco Divestment Project, set up just two weeks ago.

Already, the movement has racked up two big wins: On Monday, City University of New York promised to unload its stock in tobacco companies, valued at $3.5 million, after a plea by Edith Everett, a member of its board and the board of the Tobacco Divestment Project.

Last week, Harvard University disclosed it had purged cigarette makers from its $4.7 billion endowment, citing concerns over the dangers of smoking. Harvard wouldn't say how much money was involved. A Massachusetts Department of Health official last month estimated Harvard's tobacco stake at $50 million. Legislation is pending in Massachusetts to force state pensions out of tobacco stocks.

Wall Street has taken notice: Tobacco stocks tumbled Wednesday in a generally flat market, partly on expectations of institutional stock sales. Philip Morris Cos., the nation's largest tobacco company, fell 1 to $44 1/8 and was the most active stock on the New York Stock Exchange.

Tobacco companies are staying low-key. ``People buy and sell our stock every day for a range of reasons. I place no value judgment on them,'' Philip Morris Vice President George Knox said Thursday. ``We just have to watch (the divestment issue) play out and see how it develops.''

Tobacco companies are just the latest target of a growing trend toward socially-conscious investing. Baby boomers, having long abandoned the protests of the 1960s, increasingly use their growing economic clout to make a point. Evidence of that: The steady growth of socially conscious mutual funds and money managers, such as Franklin Research & Development or the Calvert group of mutual funds.

But even socially conscious money managers see no firestorm from the tobacco divestment movement. ``I think they will start something in terms of giving the issue greater visibility in the investment world,'' says Scott Klinger, a vice president at Franklin Research. ``Do I think it'll make the boards sit up and say, `We've gotta look for a way to get out of this business?' I'm not sure.''

Certainly, there are some big targets for the tobacco divestment's attack. Government pension funds are super-sensitive to pressure from lawmakers. University endowments can be pressured by students, faculty and alumni. Over the past decade, the outcry against apartheid has forced many university and government pension funds to unload stock in companies that did business with South Africa. Some of those companies, including IBM, Exxon and Mobil, pulled out of South Africa partly as a result.

Now anti-smoking groups and ``socially responsible'' investors have set their sights on the embattled tobacco industry, which they see as a merchant of disease and death.

``Much as the movement to divest South African stocks caused the public to view South Africa'' in a more truthful light, ``this movement will help the public see the tobacco companies as the moral outlaws that they are,'' says anti-smoking activist Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds and a key player in the divestment movement.

And the movement won't stop at academia. The divestment project plans to pressure other institutional investors as well, particularly insurance companies and hospital endowments and pension funds, which deal with the disease and death linked to tobacco use. In addition to pressing cigarette makers, Krevor says his group will consider taking on tobacco export-import companies such as Universal Corp. and Standard Commercial.

``It's ludicrous, ridiculous,'' says K.V. Dey, president of The Ligett Group, the Durham, N.C.-based maker of L&M, Chesterfield and Lark cigarettes. ``My goodness gracious, if they're going to take that attitude, they better divest themselves of a lot of things - chemicals and everything else.''

Tobacco companies aren't as likely to respond to stockholder pressure as the companies that did business in South Africa were. Two reasons:

- Pulling out of South Africa is a lot easier than withdrawing from the tobacco business. Most big companies could close shop in South Africa without seriously jeopardizing their earnings. ``Few companies had more than 1% of their business in South Africa,'' admits Timothy Smith, executive director of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, which has been active in both movements.By contrast, Philip Morris draws about 40% of its revenue and 65% of its earnings from tobacco. Even heavy pressure from shareholders probably wouldn't convince Philip Morris executives to jettison tobacco.

- Tobacco stocks are a hot investment. Just look at Philip Morris. During the 1980s, it was the best-performing company on the 30-stock Dow Jones industrial average, soaring 825% in the decade, vs. a 228% rise for the Dow. Last year, Philip Morris climbed 64%, vs. a 27% rise in the Dow. So far this year it's up 6%, despite Thursday's slide. Indeed, several analysts on Wall Street advised investors to take advantage of Thursday's sell-off by buying tobacco shares on the cheap. ``Tobacco stocks have been good investments forever. I already had a buy on all those stocks,'' says Ron Morrow of Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. ``There's nothing about Harvard deciding to sell its stock that's going to hurt Philip Morris or slow its growth - nothing. Harvard just will not participate in that growth; someone else will.''

The divestment activists know they won't bring tobacco giants to their knees. Says Krevor: ``Are we challenging their survival? At some point, that will be an issue. We are not close to that point yet.''

Indeed. Economics yield little to emotion in the investment world. ``As someone who has lost a family member (his father) to cancer of the lungs, I don't need to be educated on the evils of tobacco,'' says Michigan Treasurer Robert Bowman. But the $18 billion-assets state pension system he runs has no plans to sell its $100 million worth of Philip Morris stock. ``Tobacco is harmful,'' Bowman says. ``But so are automobiles. So is gasoline. So is fast food and soft drinks.''

Anti-smoking groups hope the pressure will at least force the tobacco industry to abandon the practices they find most offensive: aggressive marketing to teen-agers and Third World countries - concerns Harvard cited in its decision to divest.

For now, their message is aimed as much at the public as it at the executive suite. ``When you own a tobacco stock, whether it's one share or 100,000 shares, you're not just profiting from an investment. You're putting your seal of approval on the tobacco industry,'' Krevor argues. ``When you take their dividend payments, you are taking tainted money. We're saying that's unethical.''

TEXT OF GRAPHIC Six firms account for all U.S. cigarette production... Philip Morris 41.9% Liggett 3.1% American Brands 6.9% Lorillard (Loews Corp.) 8.0% B&W Tobacco (B.A.T. Industries) 11.5% RJR Nabisco 28.6%

...but the attack on smoking could affect other firms

Pctg. from tobacco (1) Thursday Total Owned by

Company Revenue Profit close shares institu-

tions(2) American Brands 59% 65% $67 5/8, -1 3/8 95.8M 44% BAT Industries 54% 52% $12(3), + 1/8 1,520M(3) 3%(3) Culbro Corp. 89% 50% $25 7/8, - 1/4 4.3M 34% Dibrell Bros. 64% 89% $22 1/4, unch. 6.6M 33% Loews Corp. 17% 39% $116 7/8, - 1/4 75.1M 53% Philip Morris 40% 65% $44 1/8, -1 928.5M 60% Standard Commercial 48% 100% $11 1/2, - 1/4 8.2M 29% UST Inc. 80% 98% $29, -1 109.1M 48% Universal Corp. 52% 81% $31 1/8, unch., 16.9M 52%

1 - Contributions from continuing tobacco operations are for latest fiscal year recorded by Standard & Poor's Corp. Profit may be operating income or net income. 2 - CDA Investment Technologies, as of Dec. 31. U.S. institutions only. 3 - For American Deposit ory Receipts, equal to one common share of British company. Source: USA TODAY research CUTLINE:REYNOLDS: Tobacco magnate's grandson is key player in divestment movement.

GRAPHIC;color,Source:USA TODAY research(Graph,chart);PHOTO;color,Brent Jones(FP,Patrick Reynolds,F1)

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HEALTH TAB

Smoke-Free, Finally; Tales of Triumph Over Nicotine

Robert H. Williams
Washington Post Staff Writer
718 words
31 July 1990
The Washington Post
FINAL
z14

The Last Puff

By John W. Farquhar and Gene A. Spiller

(W.W. Norton & Co., New York) 252 pp.; $18.95

My late mother-in-law used to leave a Reader's Digest open, face down, on the ivory lace on one of her walnut veneer tables when my wife and I visited. The first time, I picked it up and began reading. It was a graphic account of the surgical removal of a smoker's lung, one of those ugly scare pieces the Reader's Digest was so good at as it strove, in the 1950s, to set the moral, social, political and health agenda for middle America. As I was about halfway through the piece I noticed the date on the magazine, and it not only wasn't current, it was more than a year old.

The same magazine appeared each time I visited, always open to the same spot, but I never fell for it again, and continued to smoke for another quarter of a century, noting with some smugness that along the way I had managed to outlive her.

So here comes John Farquhar, a physician, and Gene Spiller, who has a doctorate in nutrition, both specialists in preventive medicine, with what might easily have been one more in a long line of nagging books, articles and multimedia harangues on the evils of smoking. Instead, it manages to be a valuable little book with something for everyone.

Everyone, that is, with an interest in quitting smoking.

The two have compiled the self-told stories of 30 men and women who in one way or another managed to divest themselves of a noxious and dangerous addiction. The stories, two to five pages each, chronicle the role of smoking in their lives, generally not much different than our own, with a few notable exceptions.

The exceptions are a delight to encounter: The story of David Goerlitz, who for six years was the Winston Man, the model who represented Winston cigarettes in newspaper and magazine ads and who smoked three packs a day and gave that up along with his $75,000 a year in modeling fees.

"What stopped me," he wrote, "was seeing kids 12 and 13 buying cigarettes and lighting up, and the fear that I might have influenced them to smoke. What stopped me was the realization that the tobacco industry commits murder, and I have been an accessory for six years."

Another interesting and unusual story is that of Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., who tells us that his grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, chewed tobacco and died of cancer of the pancreas and that his father smoked heavily and died at 58 after years of emphysema, as did his father's sister. Patrick Reynolds smoked for 17 years, and in attempting to quit tried Smokenders, acupuncture, cold turkey and something called the Schick negative reinforcement method of direct punishment. He finally quit on his own, in the process working out, with a psychologist, the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, into which he has pumped a lot of his inheritance.

Co-author Farquhar tells his own story of addiction and quitting, in his mid-thirties. For the most part, the stories are of ordinary people's battles with the weed, although actress Celeste Holm's story is included. Some are more successful than others. But all share essentially the same element: at some point in their lives they made a decision to quit smoking, and their ability to do that began to coalesce around that decision, in some cases gradually, and in some cases suddenly and almost spontaneously. The stories echo the personal conversations about alcoholism in Dennis Wholey's "The Courage to Change," a bestseller of the mid '80s, and were inspired by the "drunkalogues" of Alcoholics Anonymous groups, in which 40 or so recovered alcoholics tell their stories.

The book deals briefly with the nature of nicotine addiction, and has some good answers to frequently asked questions about weight gain, stress and emotional change.

This is a book you can put on your coffee table for your son-in-law with love and without fear of antagonism.

 

 

 

LIFESTYLE

Success stories in war on smoking

Robert H. Williams
WASHINGTON POST SERVICE
717 words
9 August 1990
Austin American-Statesman
FINAL
E1

CORRECTION; 8/10/90; PAGE A2 A story of Page E1 of Thursday's Lifestyle section omitted the title of a book offering advice on how to quit smoking: The Last Puff, by John W. Farquhar and Gene A. Spiller (W.W. Norton & Co., New York, 252 pp., $18.95).

My late mother-in-law used to leave a Reader's Digest open, face down, on the ivory lace on one of her walnut veneer tables when my wife and I visited. The first time, I picked it up and began reading. It was a graphic account of the surgical removal of a smoker's lung, one of those ugly scare pieces the Reader's Digest was so good at as it strove, in the 1950s, to set the moral, social, political and health agenda for middle America.

As I was about halfway through the piece I noticed the date on the magazine, and it not only wasn't current, it was more than a year old.

The same magazine appeared each time I visited, always open to the same spot, but I never fell for it again, and continued to smoke for another quarter of a century, noting with some smugness that along the way I had managed to outlive her.

So here comes John Farquhar, a physician, and Gene Spiller, who has a doctorate in nutrition, both specialists in preventive medicine, with what might easily have been one more in a long line of nagging books, articles and multimedia harangues on the evils of smoking. Instead, it manages to be a valuable little book with something for everyone.

Everyone, that is, with an interest in quitting smoking.

The two have compiled the self-told stories of 30 men and women who in one way or another managed to divest themselves of a noxious and dangerous addiction. The stories, two to five pages each, chronicle the role of smoking in their lives, generally not much different from our own, with a few notable exceptions.

The exceptions are a delight to encounter: The story of David Goerlitz, who for six years was the Winston Man, the model who represented Winston cigarettes in newspaper and magazine ads and who smoked three packs a day and gave that up along with his $75,000 a year in modeling fees.

"What stopped me," he wrote, "was seeing kids 12 and 13 buying cigarettes and lighting up, and the fear that I might have influenced them to smoke. What stopped me was the realization that the tobacco industry commits murder, and I have been an accessory for six years."

Another interesting and unusual story is that of Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., who tells us that his grandfather, R.J. Reynolds, chewed tobacco and died of cancer of the pancreas and that his father smoked heavily and died at 58 after years of emphysema, as did his father's sister.

Patrick Reynolds smoked for 17 years, and in attempting to quit tried Smokenders, acupuncture, cold turkey and something called the Schick negative reinforcement method of direct punishment. He finally quit on his own, in the process working out, with a psychologist, the Reynolds Stop Smoking Program, into which he has pumped a lot of his inheritance.

Co-author Farquhar tells his story of addiction and quitting, in his mid-30s. For the most part, the stories are of ordinary people's battles with the weed, although actress Celeste Holm's story is included. Some are more successful than others. But all share essentially the same element: At some point in their lives, they made a decision to quit smoking, and their ability to do that began to coalesce around that decision, in some cases gradually, and in some cases suddenly and almost spontaneously.

The stories echo the personal conversations about alcoholism in Dennis Wholey's The Courage to Change, a best seller of the mid-'80s, and were inspired by the "drunkalogues" of Alcoholics Anonymous groups, in which 40 or so recovered alcoholics tell their stories.

This is a book you can put on your coffee table for your son-in-law with love and without fear of antagonism.

 

 

 

Metro; PART-B; Metro Desk

Panel Backs No-Smoking Rule for L.A. Restaurants City Hall: The full council will act on the proposal in four or five weeks. The tobacco industry is expected to lobby heavily against it.

JANE FRITSCH
TIMES STAFF WRITER
629 words
14 August 1990
Los Angeles Times
Home
1

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1990 All Rights Reserved)

A proposal to ban smoking in all Los Angeles restaurants was approved by a City Council committee Monday over the protests of restaurant owners, who fear their businesses would be hurt.

If the full council approves the measure, Los Angeles would become the first major city in the nation to impose such a ban.

The controversial matter will be taken up in four to five weeks and council members expect heavy lobbying.

"To say the very least, we are elated. But the tobacco industry is not going to take this lying down," said Ahron Leichtman, president of Citizens Against Tobacco Smoke, a national lobbying organization.

The proposal has met with strong opposition from restaurant and business interests since it was proposed by Councilman Marvin Braude last May.

But after a public hearing Monday, the measure was approved by a 3-1 vote.

Braude, chairman of the Environmental Affairs Committee, and committee members Councilwomen Ruth Galanter and Joy Picus voted for it.

Councilman Joel Wachs, chairman of the Arts, Health and Humanities Committee, which was invited who sat in onto the special hearing, cast the negative vote. He said he was not convinced that a few hours' exposure to smoke in a restaurant was significant and wanted more information before taking a final position.

"I'm no more able to make a decision on this now than I was before the hearing," he said.

Braude, the council's most tenacious anti-smoking crusader, used recent data on the health dangers of second-hand smoke to justify his push for the ban. "This proposal is crucial to protect the health of non-smokers from second-hand smoke," he said.

Braude called tobacco smoke a "deadly carcinogen" that kills 35,000 non-smokers a year in the United States.

Patrick Reynolds, a grandson of R. J. Reynolds, the founder of the giant tobacco company, also spoke in favor of the ban, saying that second-hand smoke causes cancer.

"The evidence is in and it's overwhelming," said Reynolds, who has broken with his family and now crusades against tobacco.

Others who support the ban cited health considerations, both for restaurant patrons and workers.

Several speakers opposed to the measure cited economic reasons, focusing on the experience of Beverly Hills, which enacted a ban on restaurant smoking only to rescind the measure when patronage fell sharply.

Rudy Cole, executive vice president of Restaurants for a Sensible Voluntary Policy, said the ban would be "disastrous" for restaurant owners. "There is a direct relationship between dining and smoking for many people," he said.

Dori Pye, president of the Los Angeles Business Council, argued that the measure would make the city seem "unfriendly" to the German and Japanese tourists. "These people like to smoke," she said.

The owner of a restaurant that caters to Filipinos voiced a similar complaint. And Gerald Breitbart, a spokesman for the California Restaurant Assn. said the ban would hurt small restaurants in "ethnic communities" where many people smoke.

It is not yet clear whether the full council will support the ban, by far the most stringent measure proposed by Braude since he began pushing for anti-smoking proposals 15 years ago.

Los Angeles has ordinances-all authored by Braude-barring smoking in grocery stores, elevators and rooms where public meetings are being conducted.

Under a Braude-sponsored law that was enacted in 1987, restaurants with more than 50 seats must set aside as least half of them for non-smokers. Smaller restaurants are exempt from the law.

 

 

 

Metro; PART-B; Metro Desk

Panels OK Full Ban on Smoking in Restaurants City Hall: Committees delay putting proposal before council for four weeks to give opponents time to suggest alternatives.

From Times Wire Services
576 words
14 August 1990
Los Angeles Times
Southland
1

(Copyright, The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1990 All Rights Reserved)

Two Los Angeles City Council committees, after hearing two hours of vigorous debate, approved a controversial ordinance Monday to ban smoking in the city's 8,600 restaurants.

However, the committees also voted to put off submitting the ordinance for consideration by the full council for at least four weeks to give opponents time to propose possible amendments that may lead to a less-restrictive law.

Typically, ordinances adopted by committee are forwarded to the full council within two weeks.

In a special joint session, the council's Environmental Quality and Waste Management Committee and the Arts, Health and Humanities Committee approved the ban over the strenuous objections of restaurant owners and business groups.

During the hearing, council members Marvin Braude, who sponsored the ordinance, Ruth Galanter and Joel Wachs heard from about two dozen opponents and supporters of the proposed ban, including Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco company magnate R. J. Reynolds.

Councilman Joel Wachs, who abstained from voting, said he needed to see more evidence before he could believe either side's claims.

"I'm no more able to make a decision on this now than I was before the hearing," he said.

After Braude agreed to delay a council hearing, Councilwoman Ruth Galanter voted for the proposal.

"A number of issues have been raised that I would like to grapple with," said Galanter, who has supported Braude's past anti-smoking efforts.

Los Angeles has ordinances-all authored by Braude-barring smoking in grocery stores, elevators and rooms where public meetings are being conducted, and requiring restaurants with seating for 50 or more people to set aside at least half the tables for nonsmokers.

Restaurateurs based their opposition to the latest proposal on the claim that smokers would not go out to eat if they could not also smoke. Several cited the experience of Beverly Hills, which enacted a complete ban on restaurant smoking when Los Angeles adopted its current law, only to rescind the measure when patronage fell sharply.

"I am concerned with the economic future of our institution," said Michael Taix, part owner of the venerable Les Freres Taix restaurant on Sunset Boulevard.

"The Beverly Hills experiment should illustrate how lethal this ban can be to our marginally profitable business," he said.

Rudy Cole of Restaurants for a Sensible Voluntary Policy, a coalition claiming 200 member restaurants in Los Angeles, said the adequacy of the current law is demonstrated by the lack of public complaint.

But Braude and other supporters of the measure said their position had little to do with diners' comfort.

"Tobacco smoke is a deadly carcinogen," Braude said. "It kills both smokers and nonsmokers."

While the surgeon general estimates that tobacco kills 395,000 users a year, Braude said, "recent scientific disclosures indicate that at least 35,000 nonsmoking Americans also die each year as a result of other people's smoking."

The risk of lung cancer is 30 times as high for people highly exposed to second-hand smoke as for the nonsmoking general public, according to Dr. Wilbur Hallett of the USC Medical School and the American Lung Assn.

But Wachs said he was not convinced of the significance of smoke exposure from spending a few hours at a restaurant.

 

 

 

News

STATE: BRIEFLY FIRES SET BY LIGHTNING ARE DOUSED BY RAIN

389 words
20 August 1990
Los Angeles Daily News
Valley
N6

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