Newsclips  1991 - 1996

 

 

WASHINGTON AP - Job growth disappeared in March, leaving the unemployment...

819 words
2 April 1993
The Associated Press


WILMINGTON, Del. AP - RJR Nabisco Inc. pledged to improve cigarette sales despite pleas from some shareholders, including the grandson of founder R.J. Reynolds, that the company become a leader in the anti-smoking campaign.

The differences emerged at the tobacco and food conglomerate's annual meeting here on Friday.

Five anti-smoking shareholders, including Patrick Reynolds, failed in a bid for seats on the board of directors.

 

 

RJR Nabisco Set to Gain Market Share in Tobacco Sales

THERESA HUMPHREY
623 words
2 April 1993
The Associated Press


WILMINGTON, Del. AP - RJR Nabisco Inc. pledged Friday to improve cigarette sales despite pleas from some shareholders, including the grandson of founder R.J. Reynolds, that the company become a leader in the anti-smoking campaign.

The differences emerged at the tobacco and food conglomerate's annual meeting here.

Five anti-smoking shareholders, including Patrick Reynolds, failed in a bid for seats on the board of directors.

Some of the dissidents targeted the company's popular Camel brand for particular criticism and the cartoon character "Old Joe" Camel, which they said targets cigarettes toward young people.

Nonetheless, Karl von der Heyden, co-chairman and chief executive, told shareholders that, despite declining sales in the United States, the company's overall tobacco sales have grown 27 percent over the past two years.

Von der Heyden said the increase was due to expansions into new international markets and growth in established businesses in western Europe, Asia, Canada and Latin America.

"We're committed to making the most of every new strategic opportunity that arises in the international market," von der Heyden said. "But we're also continuing to build our core, global business around our key brands - Winston, Camel and Salem, which provide the lion's share of sales and profits in this business."

Camels were the focus of complaints from the shareholders who wanted the company to participate in the anti-smoking campaign.

"If my grandfather saw the Joe Camel campaign, I truly believe he would be shocked, dismayed and saddened," Reynolds said.

Reynolds urged the company "moral leaders in the tobacco industry" and push for a ban on all cigarette advertising.

And he suggested the company send him on a tour to colleges and public schools to talk to youths about smoking.

Others decried the Joe Camel advertisements for allegedly targeting young people, but co-chairman Lawrence Ricciardi assured shareholders the company does not condone underage smoking.

"The company actually discourages underage smoking. We do not want underage people smoking anywhere in the world," Ricciardi said.

The annual meeting came a week after RJR chief Louis V. Gerstner Jr. left the company to take the helm at International Business Machines Inc. RJR's board then took the unusual step of naming co-chief executives - von der Heyden, who was chief financial officer, and Ricciardi, RJR's general counsel and executive vice president.

Ricciardi assured shareholders "we haven't skipped a beat at RJR Nabisco" since Gerstner's departure. He also noted Gerstner remains a member of the board, although he was absent from the meeting. In addition, shareholders approved an expansion of the board from 15 to 16 members to include Ricciardi.

In its domestic tobacco business, von der Heyden said R.J. Reynolds is coming off a decade of decline in volume and market share, especially for top full-priced cigarettes. Factors contributing to the decline were the possibility of new federal cigarette taxes and a shift by consumers from full-price brands to lower-priced brands, including generics, he said.

There has been rapid growth for the lowest-priced cigarettes and "our performance in that tier will be an important part of our overall share of retail position," von der Heyden said.

On Nabisco Foods, von der Heyden said 1992 was an ambitious year for new products. He said two new lines of reduced-fat snacks are aimed at "aging Baby Boomers" who make up one of the fastest-growing market segments.

The new snacks, Mr. Phipps Tater Crisps and SnackWell's, have generated more than $100 million in sales since their introduction in August.

"They're a terrific new source of business for us," von der Heyden said.

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BUSINESS

RJR NABISCO PLANNING EFFORT TO INCREASE SALE OF CIGARETTES

Theresa Humphrey Associated Press
356 words
3 April 1993
Los Angeles Daily News
Valley
B3

 

RJR Nabisco Inc. pledged Friday to improve cigarette sales despite pleas from some shareholders, including the grandson of founder R.J. Reynolds, that the company become a leader in the anti-smoking campaign.

The differences emerged at the tobacco and food conglomerate's annual meeting here.

Five anti-smoking shareholders, including Patrick Reynolds, failed in a bid for seats on the board of directors.

Some of the dissidents targeted the company's popular Camel brand for particular criticism and the cartoon character "Old Joe" Camel, which they said influences young people to smoke.

Nonetheless, Karl von der Heyden, co-chairman and chief executive, told shareholders that, despite declining sales in the United States, the company's overall tobacco sales have grown 27 percent over the past two years.

Von der Heyden said the increase was due to expansions into new international markets and growth in established businesses in Western Europe, Asia, Canada and Latin America.

"We're committed to making the most of every new strategic opportunity that arises in the international market," von der Heyden said. "But we're also continuing to build our core, global business around our key brands - Winston, Camel and Salem, which provide the lion's share of sales and profits in this business."

Camels were the focus of complaints from the shareholders who wanted the company to participate in the anti-smoking campaign.

"If my grandfather saw the Joe Camel campaign, I truly believe he would be shocked, dismayed and saddened," Reynolds said.

Reynolds urged the company to be "moral leaders in the tobacco industry" and push for a ban on cigarette advertising.

And he suggested the company send him on a tour to colleges and public schools to talk to youths about smoking.

Others decried the Joe Camel advertisements for allegedly focusing on young people, but co-chairman Lawrence Ricciardi assured shareholders the company does not condone underage smoking.

"The company actually discourages underage smoking. We do not want underage people smoking anywhere in the world," Ricciardi said.

Main story: Philip Morris to boost Marlboro.

 

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MONEY

Old Joe must go

3 April 1993
The New Orleans Times-Picayune
THIRD
C1


WILMINGTON, Del. - The grandson of R.J. Reynolds on Friday urged RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp. to kill off "Old Joe Camel," the cigarette ad gimmick that critics say targets children and teen-agers. Patrick Reynolds said that, were his grandfather alive today, "I sincerely believe that he would be shocked and dismayed and saddened" at the ad campaign.

 

 

BUSINESS

RJR WON'T QUIT TOBACCO SALES PUSH

The Associated Press
214 words
3 April 1993
The Record, Northern New Jersey
All Editions.=.Two Star B. Two Star P. One Star
a08

 

RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp. pledged Friday to improve cigarette sales despite pleas from some shareholders, including the grandson of founder R.J. Reynolds, that the company become a leader in the anti-smoking campaign.

The differences emerged at the tobacco and food conglomerate's annual meeting here.

Five anti-smoking shareholders, including Patrick Reynolds, failed in their bid for seats on the board of directors.

"If my grandfather saw the Joe Camel campaign, I truly believe he would be shocked, dismayed, and saddened," Reynolds said.

Some of the dissidents singled out the company's popular Camel brand for particular criticism. They said the cartoon character "Old Joe" Camel targets young people.

Nonetheless, Karl von der Heyden, co-chairman and chief executive, told shareholders that, despite declining sales in the United States, the company's overall tobacco sales have grown 27 percent during the past two years.

The annual meeting came a week after RJR chief Louis V. Gerstner Jr. left the company to take the helm at International Business Machines Corp. RJR's board then took the unusual step of naming co-chief executives _ Von der Heyden, who was chief financial officer, and Lawrence Ricciardi, RJR's general counsel and executive vice president.

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BUSINESS

TALK OF PRICE CUT FIRES UP RJR

1993, Bloomberg Business News
366 words
3 April 1993
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
FIVE STAR
08C

 

The top tobacco executive at RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp. predicted "full-scale war" Friday after his archrival, Philip Morris Cos. Inc., said it would cut cigarette prices.

James W. Johnston, chairman and chief executive of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., RJR Nabisco's tobacco unit, made the remark to a colleague after his company's annual meeting.

Speaking in earshot of reporters, Johnston said, "You hear about Philip Morris? It's full-scale war. You'll be hearing more about it."

Philip Morris announced it will cut the price of its Marlboro cigarettes to halt erosion of the flagship brand's market share to discounted brands. Philip Morris said it will expand an existing Marlboro promotion, increase distibution of its discount brands, and avoid further price increases on premium brands for now.

The Philip Morris news upstaged anything RJR officials had to say about their company at their shareholders meeting.

Anti-smoking activists at the meeting accounted for almost all the comments from the floor, led by Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R.J. Reynolds.

Reynolds told RJR officials they should "take the moral lead" and hire a lobbyist who would press Congress to enact a ban on cigarette advertising.

Reynolds said he was taking a "conciliatory approach," recognizing that he couldn't hope to end smoking in the country or persuade one tobacco company to stop advertising if competitors continued. He suggested, though, that a total advertising ban would provide a level playing field for tobacco companies while eliminating media images that influence the young to smoke.

An eerie silence fell over the audience as anti-smoking board candidate David Bresnick, a laryngectomy patient, criticized RJR for using the cartoon character Joe Camel, which critics have said targets young smokers.

Bresnick held a microphone to his neck, and the buzzing, mechanically reproduced monotone reverberated in the high recesses of the rococo Gold Ballroom.

"I don't want this to happen to anyone else," Bresnick said. "I am amazed and appalled at the recognition by the young of Joe Camel. What is wrong with you that you can't admit what everybody knows is harmful?"

 

 

PART-A; Metro Desk

Smoking Ban Kicks In at All L.A. Restaurants

JAMES RAINEY; RICHARD SIMON
TIMES STAFF WRITERS
1,383 words
3 August 1993
Los Angeles Times
Home
1

The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1993  

Los Angeles' long-contested ban on smoking in restaurants suddenly went into effect Monday, when the city clerk's office declared that a coalition of restaurant owners had failed in a petition drive to put the issue before voters.

While nonsmokers declared victory and the city attorney's office said it would begin enforcing the ban immediately, opponents vowed to go to court to seek an order allowing smokers to continue lighting up in the city's nearly 7,000 enclosed eateries.

The petitions were invalidated because many of those signing or circulating them were found not to be registered Los Angeles city voters.

In the meantime, the Los Angeles Police Department said it will respond to complaints about restaurant smoking, but that such calls are likely to be of low priority. Smokers can be fined from $50 to $250, while restaurant owners who defy the law face up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

"August 2nd should be remembered as a historic day for the city of Los Angeles," said Councilman Marvin Braude, who pushed the smoking ban through the council in late June. "It represents the day when the people of our city said `No' to the powerful tobacco industry."

Other anti-smoking advocates-noting that Long Beach and Pasadena also voted to prohibit restaurant smoking in recent weeks-predicted that enforcement of the Los Angeles law will be a catalyst for more smoking restrictions.

"I believe other cities around Los Angeles are quickly going to fall into place and pass 100% bans," said Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. who has bucked the family business by campaigning for laws limiting the use of tobacco. He became an anti-smoking activist after his father, a longtime smoker, died of emphysema. "This is a day when all Los Angeles can breathe a little easier."

And a coalition of nonsmokers announced Monday that it will go to court in an attempt to get an order prohibiting smoking in all public facilities including hotels. The group said at a Woodland Hills news conference that such smoking violates the Americans with Disabilities Act by exposing those with respiratory illnesses to dangerous secondhand smoke.

The sudden invalidation of the pro-smoking petitions Monday was a surprise to both sides, which had been girding for an expensive election to settle the matter. The mere submission of the petitions blocked enforcement of the law for one week and could have held it up until November or June, when the matter would have gone before voters.

Instead, the petition campaign seems all but dead. The law took effect about 10 a.m. Monday, when the city attorney's office received notice from the clerk that the petitions had been invalidated.

The Los Angeles Hospitality Coalition, the restaurant group formed to fight the ban, had submitted 97,572 signatures to the clerk's office July 24. That appeared to be a comfortable cushion above the 58,275 signatures the group needed to put the ordinance to a vote.

But in taking a 5% sample of the signatures-standard procedure under the City Charter-the clerk's office found that less than 43% of the signatures were those of registered Los Angeles City voters. The number was so low that the clerk was not even required by the charter to count the balance of the signatures, said Kristin Heffron, head of the clerk's Elections Division.

Restaurant coalition members, who had been backed by the tobacco industry, said the clerk's office botched the petition review.

"What we will be requesting is a court order asking that the ordinance be stayed while all of the petitions are reviewed," said Dana Reed, attorney for the Hospitality Coalition. The city clerk "hired 28 temporary employees to go in and check these signatures and they just didn't do a very good job," Reed said.

More than a quarter of those signing petitions were not listed on the county's voter registration rolls, while nearly a quarter more were thrown out because those circulating the petitions were not Los Angeles city voters, as required by the charter, Heffron said.

Reed said it was "a terrible error" to throw out signatures simply because the petition circulators were not properly registered.

"The courts won't allow them to do that," Reed said. "You can't penalize the people who signed the petition because of an alleged error by the circulator."

The City Charter gives the petition sponsors one month to challenge the validation procedure. The greatest threat to the law may come from Sacramento, where restaurant owners and tobacco interests are supporting a law by Assemblyman Curtis Tucker Jr. D-Inglewood that would remove the power of cities to regulate smoking.

Another bill, by Assemblyman Terry B. Friedman D-Brentwood, would ban smoking in restaurants statewide.

Los Angeles is the largest city in the United States to ban smoking in restaurants and one of 60 jurisdictions in the state and 70 nationwide to prohibit restaurant smoking. Ten more California cities will consider smoking bans in the next month.

The Los Angeles City Council narrowly passed its law after a 15-year campaign by Braude, a former smoker. Proponents said their cause gained momentum when the federal Environmental Protection Agency declared secondhand smoke a significant contributor to cancer and later recommended that employers minimize their employees' contact with tobacco smoke.

Opponents have argued that the bans unfairly limit personal freedom and harm business by driving smokers out of restaurants.

The Los Angeles law applies to all enclosed restaurants but does not govern bars-even if they are located inside eateries. Patrons also are permitted to smoke in outdoor patios.

Los Angeles police said they have made no specific plans for enforcing the ordinance.

"We will handle it the same way we handle any call for service," said spokesman John Dunkin. "We will take the appropriate action, but we have to give it some kind of priority."

While saying the department will not trivialize the law, Dunkin added that many more serious crimes would get priority.

A spokesman for City Atty. James Hahn said the office has never had to prosecute people for smoking and is hoping for voluntary compliance.

But some restaurant owners said they do not plan on helping the enforcement effort. "I'm not going to play policeman," said Frank Holoman, owner of the Boulevard Cafe in the Crenshaw district.

A spot check of several downtown restaurants Monday evening showed that word about the ban had not traveled far. From the ultra-casual Philippe of French dip sandwich fame to the trendy Kachina Grill, most of those overseeing the dinner service said they were unaware of the new ban.

Marcelo Falcon, assistant manager of historic Olvera Street's El Paseo de Los Angeles, shook his head while a party of six puffed away over pre-dinner drinks in the restaurant's main dining room. "I don't think the owner knows about this," Falcon said. "Probably we'll have some business losses, but for me, it's better because I don't smoke."

But Sammy Cheung, manager of the Ocean Seafood restaurant in Chinatown, said the new ordinance will spell disaster for Los Angeles eateries.

"We will lose a lot of customers. People will go to Monterey Park," he said, referring to the San Gabriel Valley city with a large Asian population and a growing number of ethnic restaurants. "If we make less, the city makes less in taxes," added Cheung, who said about half his customers request seating in the large restaurant's smoking section.

At least one restaurant was ready. Susan Onodera, assistant manager of Horikawa in Little Tokyo, had caught word of the ban on an early evening television news broadcast and was scrambling to set out the "no smoking" signs the restaurant had had printed up right after the ordinance was approved in June.

"We have a lot of Japanese clientele that like to smoke," Onodera said. "We'll just have to send them to the bar or to a private room."

Times staff writer Jean Merl contributed to this report.

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PART-A; Zones Desk

Smoking Ban Kicks In at All L.A. Restaurants

JAMES RAINEY; RICHARD SIMON
TIMES STAFF WRITERS
1,385 words
3 August 1993
Los Angeles Times
Valley
1

 The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1993  

Los Angeles' long-contested ban on smoking in restaurants suddenly went into effect Monday, when the city clerk's office declared that a coalition of restaurant owners had failed in a petition drive to put the issue before voters.

While nonsmokers declared victory and the city attorney's office said it would begin enforcing the ban immediately, opponents vowed to go to court to seek an order allowing smokers to continue lighting up in the city's nearly 7,000 enclosed eateries.

The petitions were invalidated because many of those signing or circulating them were found not to be registered Los Angeles city voters.

In the meantime, the Los Angeles Police Department said it will respond to complaints about restaurant smoking, but that such calls are likely to be of low priority. Smokers can be fined from $50 to $250, while restaurant owners who defy the law face up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

"Aug. 2 should be remembered as a historic day for the city of Los Angeles," said Councilman Marvin Braude, who pushed the smoking ban through the council in late June. "It represents the day when the people of our city said `No' to the powerful tobacco industry."

Other anti-smoking advocates-noting that Long Beach and Pasadena also voted to prohibit restaurant smoking in recent weeks-predicted that enforcement of the Los Angeles law will be a catalyst for more smoking restrictions.

"I believe other cities around Los Angeles are quickly going to fall into place and pass 100% bans," said Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. who has bucked the family business by campaigning for laws limiting the use of tobacco. He became an anti-smoking activist after his father, a longtime smoker, died of emphysema. "This is a day when all Los Angeles can breathe a little easier."

And a coalition of nonsmokers announced Monday that it will go to court in an attempt to get an order prohibiting smoking in all public facilities including hotels. The group said at a Woodland Hills news conference that such smoking violates the Americans with Disabilities Act by exposing those with respiratory illnesses to dangerous secondhand smoke.

The sudden invalidation of the pro-smoking petitions Monday was a surprise to both sides, which had been girding for an expensive election to settle the matter. The mere submission of the petitions blocked enforcement of the law for one week and could have held it up until November or June, when the matter would have gone before voters.

Instead, the petition campaign seems all but dead. The law took effect about 10 a.m. Monday, when the city attorney's office received notice from the clerk that the petitions had been invalidated.

The Los Angeles Hospitality Coalition, the restaurant group formed to fight the ban, had submitted 97,572 signatures to the clerk's office July 24. That appeared to be a comfortable cushion above the 58,275 signatures the group needed to put the ordinance to a vote.

But in taking a 5% sample of the signatures-standard procedure under the City Charter-the clerk's office found that fewer than 43% of the signatures were those of registered Los Angeles city voters. The number was so low that the clerk was not even required by the charter to count the balance of the signatures, said Kristin Heffron, head of the clerk's Elections Division.

Restaurant coalition members, who had been backed by the tobacco industry, said the clerk's office botched the petition review.

"What we will be requesting is a court order asking that the ordinance be stayed while all of the petitions are reviewed," said Dana Reed, attorney for the Hospitality Coalition. The city clerk "hired 28 temporary employees to go in and check these signatures and they just didn't do a very good job," Reed said.

More than a quarter of those signing petitions were not listed on the county's voter registration rolls, while nearly a quarter more were thrown out because those circulating the petitions were not Los Angeles city voters, as required by the City Charter, Heffron said.

Reed said it was "a terrible error" to throw out signatures simply because the petition circulators were not properly registered.

"The courts won't allow them to do that," Reed said. "You can't penalize the people who signed the petition because of an alleged error by the circulator."

The City Charter gives the petition sponsors one month to challenge the validation procedure. The greatest threat to the law may come from Sacramento, where restaurant owners and tobacco interests are supporting a law by Assemblyman Curtis Tucker Jr. D-Inglewood that would remove the power of cities to regulate smoking.

Another bill, by Assemblyman Terry B. Friedman D-Brentwood, would ban smoking in restaurants statewide.

Los Angeles is the largest city in the United States to ban smoking in restaurants and one of 60 jurisdictions in the state and 70 nationwide to prohibit restaurant smoking. Ten more California cities will consider smoking bans in the next month.

The Los Angeles City Council narrowly passed its law after a 15-year campaign by Braude, a former smoker. Proponents said their cause gained momentum when the federal Environmental Protection Agency declared secondhand smoke a significant contributor to cancer and later recommended that employers minimize their employees' contact with tobacco smoke.

Opponents have argued that the bans unfairly limit personal freedom and harm business by driving smokers out of restaurants.

The Los Angeles law applies to all enclosed restaurants but does not govern bars-even if they are located inside eateries. Patrons also are permitted to smoke in outdoor patios.

Los Angeles police said they have made no specific plans for enforcing the ordinance.

"We will handle it the same way we handle any call for service," said spokesman John Dunkin. "We will take the appropriate action, but we have to give it some kind of priority."

While saying the department will not trivialize the law, Dunkin added that many more serious crimes would get priority.

A spokesman for City Atty. James Hahn said the office has never had to prosecute people for smoking and is hoping for voluntary compliance.

A random sampling of restaurants in the San Fernando Valley indicated the law would make little difference-that they either prohibited smoking already or that few in their clientele still smoke.

"It is, for us, not much of a problem, I think," said Ange St. Jacques, manager of the ritzy Bistro Gardens in Studio City. "We cater to highly evolved people that are health conscious, more than the working people," he said. At least 80% of his customers do not smoke anyway, he said.

At Pinot in Studio City, manager Taylor Presnell gave an even higher figure.

"Maybe 95% are not smokers these days," he said.

Receptionist Jill Freiberg pointed out that a few people had made reservations a week or so ago for the smoking section, four tables near the bar.

"We told the customers about the ban and that we had to abide by it," Presnell said. "They were very accommodating, very understanding, and we had no problems. We had a smoke-free evening tonight."

At Cha Cha Cha in Encino, one of the hottest trendy restaurants in the Valley, manager Todd West said, "We were essentially a nonsmoking restaurant anyway." The restaurant set aside a smoking area when it opened two years ago. But so few people asked to sit there that it was impractical to keep it, he said, and so smoking has been limited to the bar area, where it will continue to be legal.

At the Oyster House in Studio City, which attracted many smokers in the past, a waitress who did not want to be identified rejoiced that those days are over.

"I fought for this ban," she said. "Everyone hates me for this, but I told them, I have a right to a safe and healthy environment. . . . I'm not afraid of being fired. It's the law, now."

Times staff writers Jean Merl and David Colker contributed to this report.

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PERSPECTIVE
Voice of the people letter.

HEALTH VS. PROFITS

Edward L. Koven.
261 words
14 September 1993
Chicago Tribune
NORTH SPORTS FINAL; N
20

 

The Sept. 4 letter from William S. Simmons, director of Smoking and Health for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. "Data on smoking link challenged", pertaining to the danger of tobacco smoke to restaurant workers, is typical of tobacco company spin-control propaganda.

A five-year-old asthmatic child can tell you about the serious adverse health consequences of being in a smoke-filled area, including a restaurant. Scientists and flight attendants convinced Congress of the need to ban smoking in domestic flight because of the lethal nature of tobacco smoke. Why restaurant workers would react differently to the 43 carcinogens and toxins of tobacco smoke and secondary tobacco smoke in an enclosed area defies any sense of logic and common sense.

The dangers of tobacco smoke have been known for nearly 400 years. King James I in 1604 observed that, "Smoking is a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain and dangerous to the lungs." Dr. William Smith, a professor of physiology at the Dartmouth Medical College, pointed out the serious health problems caused by smoking in his 1885 "Primer of Physiology and Hygiene."

And in 1986 Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of the founder of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Health and Environment that cigarettes "cause heart disease, lung disease and cancer."

It is time for R.J. Reynolds and other tobacco companies to put human lives ahead of tobacco industry profits.

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LIFE

U.S. tobacco heir praises Ontario's anti-smoking bill

By John Sherwin Special to The Star
333 words
25 November 1993
The Toronto Star
Final
C5

 The Toronto Star

ST. CATHARINES - Ontario's tough new anti-smoking bill is ``a dream come true,'' says the grandson of U.S. tobacco baron R.J. Reynolds.

A reformed smoker and campaigner against tobacco companies, Patrick Reynolds told an audience at Brock University this week that Canada is ``a model nation'' in the fight to ban cigarettes.

The warning labels on cigarette packages are ``wonderful,'' he said, adding that he thinks the higher taxes levied on cigarettes in Canada are appropriate because of the medical costs of caring for smokers.

A former pack-a-day smoker, Reynolds said his grandfather, mother and father all died from smoking-related diseases.

``My only memories of my dad are of a man gasping for breath,'' he said.

``Cigarettes took my father away from me.''

Reynolds, 44, a resident of Beverly Hills, Calif., said he sold his family stock in 1979.

He said he tried 12 times to stop smoking before he finally quit the habit seven years ago.

Ontario's proposed legislation calls for a ban on cigarettes being sold in pharmacies and in vending machines, and prohibits the sale of cigarettes to anyone under 19.

Persons caught selling cigarettes to minors will now face stiffer penalties.

``I applaud you for what you've done with cigarette legislation,'' Reynolds said, adding that he would like to see the United States prohibit the sale of tobacco products to anyone under 21, increase taxes and ban all advertising.

Reynolds, who is on a North American tour with his anti-tobacco message, was the guest of the Niagara Council on Smoking and Health.

While insisting that his family supports him in his campaign, Reynolds admits there have been many ``heated discussions'' about the effect his crusade is having on the family fortune.

The R.J. Reynolds company makes several popular cigarette brands in the United States, including Winston, Salem and Camel.

*** Infomart-Online ***

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NEWS

Grandson of tobacco king on crusade against smoking

Alfredo Corchado
Staff Writer of The Dallas Morning News
768 words
6 March 1994
The Dallas Morning News
HOME FINAL
31A

 

ARLINGTON - Cigarettes have always played a big part in Patrick Reynolds' life.

Not only was he a pack-a-day smoker, but his family fortune was built largely from cigarette sales.

Mr. Reynolds, 45, is the grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, the same company that persuaded millions of Americans to "walk a mile for a Camel," as the ads once read.

But for the past eight years, Mr. Reynolds has been fighting the multibillion dollar tobacco industry, warning audiences nationwide of the dangers of cigarette smoking.

On Saturday, Mr. Reynolds was the keynote speaker at an educational symposium on cancer prevention and new treatments. More than 100 people attended the symposium, which was sponsored by the Cancer Research Foundation of North Texas and held at Arlington Memorial Hospital.

"I'm fighting the hand that fed me because that same hand has also killed tens of millions of people worldwide," Mr. Reynolds said during an interview.

Mr. Reynolds' father disinherited Patrick after his parents divorced when he was 3, but he received a $2.5 million trust fund from his grandmother. He says he has spent more than $1 million in his anti-smoking crusade, which is inspired by one poignant and personal fact: Mr. Reynolds blames tobacco for killing some of his own family members.

His father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., died in 1964 of emphysema. His grandfather, R.J. Reynolds Sr., died in 1918 of pancreatic cancer. Patrick Reynolds' aunt, Nancy, died after losing a lung to cancer and then developing emphysema.

His father's death when he was 15 inspired his anti-smoking crusade. The memory of his father had a "profound and powerful impact on my life," he said.

Mr. Reynolds remembers writing a letter to his father. "I wrote, `Dear Dad, I want to meet you. For years I've longed for your presence and for your hugs . . . ' "

His father promptly arranged a meeting, he said.

"I remember him coughing and lying in bed and gasping for every breath," he said. "It was very difficult for me."

Still, Mr. Reynolds, like most young Americans, took up smoking when he was young - he was 18. Yet "the more I learned about the tobacco industry, the angrier and the more disturbed I became," he said.

In 1979, Mr. Reynolds divested his stock in R.J. Reynolds and in 1986, a year after he gave up smoking, Mr. Reynolds notified his two older brothers that he would testify on Capitol Hill in favor of a ban on cigarette ads.

He recalls the response from his brother Will. "He said, `You're gonna do what, boy?' " Mr. Reynolds said. His other brother, Mike, worried that the negative publicity would drive down the company's stock price.

"We had a heated exchange," Mr. Reynolds said, adding that he still spends Christmas with his family, though the issue of cigarettes is a forbidden topic.

Mr. Reynolds, chairman of the Citizens for a SmokeFree America, spends most of his time lobbying to ban cigarette ads and vending machines. He's also lobbying Congress for a higher tax on a pack of smokes, which is currently 46 cents.

"America has the lowest tax on cigarettes of any country worldwide," said Mr. Reynolds, who lives in Beverly Hills, Calif.

He is trying to persuade Congress to approve a tax that would match Canada's, which is $3.26 per pack. President Clinton initially proposed a $1 tax on cigarettes but later revised it to 75 cents, a move that Mr. Reynolds says was pushed by powerful tobacco lobbying groups.

"The tobacco industry gave record amounts to Bush and Clinton in the last presidential campaign - and no corporation ever gave money without expecting something in return," he said.

Mr. Reynolds also travels the country in support of states and cities that have proposed anti-smoking ordinances, including the one implemented in Arlington last week. Under that controversial law, smoking is banned in the city's 600 restaurants unless they install pricey ventilation systems.

But despite such efforts, Mr. Reynolds notes that cigarette sales are still on the rise, particularly among teens. About 90 percent of all smokers start by age 14, he said, and they become addicted by age 19.

PHOTOS: Margaret Beard left speaks to Patrick Reynolds after his speech Saturday at the Symposium on Cancer Prevention and New Treatment in Arlington. The Dallas Morning News: Beatriz Terrazas ; PHOTO LOCATION: Disk 32b / NB_Patrick Reynolds 5 cf 68542.

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Elders Delivers `Booster Shot' to Report on Youth and Tobacco

A.J. HOSTETLER
303 words
24 March 1994
The Associated Press

. The Associated Press.

ATLANTA AP - U.S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders warned youths nationwide Thursday that a deadly addiction awaits them if they start smoking.

During a teleconference, Elders and others discussed the reasons why adolescents smoke, its harm and how they can avoid it.

"They have as hard a time as adults at quitting," she said. "Children can't choose their environments. They don't know all the facts. They get this wonderful vision" from tobacco companies of a sexy, successful lifestyle.

The teleconference, dubbed a "booster shot" to Elders' report on smoking and children last month, was to encourage state and local anti-smoking campaigns.

The nation's top doctor was joined in the two-hour talk-show format by Dr. David Satcher, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and numerous anti-smoking activists, public educators and health officials.

The group took calls from across the country, including one from a grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, Patrick Reynolds of Los Angeles. He described his visits to schools to tell students about the dangers of smoking.

Elders report, compiled by government scientists and academic researchers, said the average age when smokers tried their first cigarette was 14.5 years. It said more than 70 percent of people who become daily smokers acquired the habit by 18.

The report also said a third to half of young people who try cigarettes become daily smokers and that at least 3.1 million people ages 12-18 smoke.

The surgeon general's report on smoking was the 23rd since the late Dr. Luther Terry fired the first salvo in 1964.

"Tobacco is addictive. Tobacco kills and we don't want our young people to go on to smoke," Elders said.

Document asp0000020011028dq3o00hi3

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NEWS

Surgeon general singles out kids for anti-smoking 'booster shot'

Associated Press
192 words
25 March 1994
The Cincinnati Post
METRO
5A

 

U.S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders warned youths nationwide Thursday that a deadly addiction awaits them if they start smoking.

During a teleconference, Dr. Elders and others discussed the reasons why adolescents smoke, its harm and how they can avoid it.

"They have as hard a time as adults at quitting," she said. "Children can't choose their environments. They don't know all the facts. They get this wonderful vision" from tobacco companies of a sexy, successful lifestyle. The teleconference, dubbed a "booster shot" to Dr. Elders' report on smoking and children last month, was to encourage state and local anti-smoking campaigns. The nation's top doctor was joined in the two-hour talk-show format by Dr. David Satcher, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and numerous anti-smoking activists, public educators and health officials. The group took calls from across the country, including one from a grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, Patrick Reynolds of Los Angeles. He described his visits to schools to tell students about the dangers of smoking.

Document cinp000020011029dq3p00hez

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MELVIN BELLI HEADS LEGAL TEAM THAT FILES $5 BILLION CLASS ACTION SUIT AGAINST ALL TOBACCO COMPANIES

496 words
30 March 1994
PR Newswire

 c 1994, PR Newswire

FDA Opens Door For Damages For Alleged Conspiracy

To Addict Customers With Nicotine

SAN FRANCISCO and NEW ORLEANS, March 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Famed attorney Melvin M. Belli, noted New Orleans class action attorney Wendell H. Gauthier and San Francisco lawyer Robert Leif head a vast legal team which has today filed the first international class action suit against America's major tobacco industries. The $5 billion suit charges Philip Morris Tobacco, R.J. Reynolds and a myriad of others with the wrongful deaths and disabilities of thousands and thousands of people who were addicted to nicotine in cigarettes caused both by the natural substance in tobacco and, most importantly, the intentional addition of extra nicotine to keep victim customers addicted in order to keep buying the product.

" ... manipulation and dosage of Nicotine not recognized on the label of the drug or tobacco product constitutes an adulteration and/or misbranding as defined by the Federal Food Drug Cosmetic Act and may constitute a criminal act and breach of duty subjecting all defendants to civil liability for all damages," states a portion of the 14-page suit by Belli and Gauthier.

Belli, who recently helped successfully sue Imelda Marcos for $1.2 billion, states, " ... 30 years ago I filed the first suit against these same tobacco companies in the same city of New Orleans. We lost because we couldn't prove the addiction of nicotine then. Now I have great satisfaction in filing this first class action suit with Wendell Gauthier against this industry that will finally have to defend themselves against these charges. We will prove that the tobacco industry has conspired to catch you, hold you and kill you ... all without a moment of remorse or self-examination."

Recently Belli has been in discussions with Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds and president of Los Angeles-based Citizens for a Smoke Free America, who says, "If litigation victories help raise the price of a pack of cigarettes, that will help cut the level of young kids starting up with smoking, then that is just fine with us. Recently the tobacco industry has been denying that cigarettes are addictive. Former Surgeon General C. Everet Coop's `Report on Nicotine Addiction' states that `nicotine is as addictive as heroin.' I believe this is a strategy by the tobacco companies to avoid litigation and to keep present customers in denial about their addiction."

Belli and Gauthier also filed today a Temporary Restraining Order and Injunction to stop the tobacco companies from destroying or altering any and all evidence which is in their possession.

United States District Court Eastern District of Louisiana

New Orleans, La., Case No.

Diane Castano, Gayle Perry and all others similarly situated

vs. Philip Morris Inc., R.J. Reynolds, et al.

CONTACT: Edward Lozzi, director, Media Affairs, of Belli Law, 818-995-8036/ 08:04 EST

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MELVIN BELLI HEADS LEGAL TEAM THAT FILES $5 BILLION CLASS ACTION SUIT AGAINST ALL TOBACCO COMPANIES

496 words
30 March 1994
PR Newswire

 c 1994, PR Newswire

FDA Opens Door For Damages For Alleged Conspiracy

To Addict Customers With Nicotine

SAN FRANCISCO and NEW ORLEANS, March 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Famed attorney Melvin M. Belli, noted New Orleans class action attorney Wendell H. Gauthier and San Francisco lawyer Robert Leif head a vast legal team which has today filed the first international class action suit against America's major tobacco industries. The $5 billion suit charges Philip Morris Tobacco, R.J. Reynolds and a myriad of others with the wrongful deaths and disabilities of thousands and thousands of people who were addicted to nicotine in cigarettes caused both by the natural substance in tobacco and, most importantly, the intentional addition of extra nicotine to keep victim customers addicted in order to keep buying the product.

" ... manipulation and dosage of Nicotine not recognized on the label of the drug or tobacco product constitutes an adulteration and/or misbranding as defined by the Federal Food Drug Cosmetic Act and may constitute a criminal act and breach of duty subjecting all defendants to civil liability for all damages," states a portion of the 14-page suit by Belli and Gauthier.

Belli, who recently helped successfully sue Imelda Marcos for $1.2 billion, states, " ... 30 years ago I filed the first suit against these same tobacco companies in the same city of New Orleans. We lost because we couldn't prove the addiction of nicotine then. Now I have great satisfaction in filing this first class action suit with Wendell Gauthier against this industry that will finally have to defend themselves against these charges. We will prove that the tobacco industry has conspired to catch you, hold you and kill you ... all without a moment of remorse or self-examination."

Recently Belli has been in discussions with Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds and president of Los Angeles-based Citizens for a Smoke Free America, who says, "If litigation victories help raise the price of a pack of cigarettes, that will help cut the level of young kids starting up with smoking, then that is just fine with us. Recently the tobacco industry has been denying that cigarettes are addictive. Former Surgeon General C. Everet Coop's `Report on Nicotine Addiction' states that `nicotine is as addictive as heroin.' I believe this is a strategy by the tobacco companies to avoid litigation and to keep present customers in denial about their addiction."

Belli and Gauthier also filed today a Temporary Restraining Order and Injunction to stop the tobacco companies from destroying or altering any and all evidence which is in their possession.

United States District Court Eastern District of Louisiana

New Orleans, La., Case No.

Diane Castano, Gayle Perry and all others similarly situated

vs. Philip Morris Inc., R.J. Reynolds, et al.

CONTACT: Edward Lozzi, director, Media Affairs, of Belli Law, 818-995-8036/ 14:31 EST

Document prn0000020011030dq3u00gdw

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Lawyer Belli, Others File $5B Suit Against Tobacco Indus

601 words
30 March 1994
Dow Jones News Service

 c 1994, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.

SAN FRANCISCO -DJ- Attorneys Melvin M. Belli, Wendell H. Gauthier Robert Leif said they today filed an international class action suit against America's major tobacco industries.

In a press release, the attorneys said the $5 billion suit charges Philip Morris Tobacco, R.J. Reynolds and other companies with the wrongful deaths and disabilities of thousands who were addicted to nicotine in cigarettes caused both by the natural substance in tobacco ''and ... the intentional addition of extra nicotine to keep victim customers addicted in order to keep buying the product.''

Belli also said 30 years ago he filed the first suit against the same tobacco companies, also in New Orleans. He said he lost that case because he couldn't prove the addiction of nicotine then but he said he now has ''great satisfaction'' in filing the current suit. He said the tobacco companies ''will finally have to defend themselves against these charges.''

Belli said he has recently been in discussions with Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds and president of Los Angeles-based Citizens for a Smoke Free America, who says, ''If litigation victories help raise the price of a pack of cigarettes, that will help cut the level of young kids starting up with smoking, then that is just fine with us...''

Belli and Gauthier also filed today a temporary restraining order and injunction to stop the tobacco companies from destroying or altering any and all evidence which is in their possession.

R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris had no immediate comment.

An attorney for Philip Morris Cos. said he was ''not surprised'' that Belli and Gauthier would ''jump on the publicity bandwagon'' created by the ''erroneous comments'' by Food and Drug Administrator Dr. David Kessler, aired on ABC's Day One program.

The program said tobacco companies inject nicotine into cigarettes to make them more addictive. The Philip Morris attorney said Philip Morris doesn't inject its cigarettes and there is ''no merit to the substance'' of the allegations raised by Belli and Gauthier.

The Philip Morris attorney also said similar suits have been filed against tobacco firms and the tobacco firms have always prevailed.

As reported March 25, Philip Morris has filed a $10 billion lawsuit against Capital Cities/ABC Inc. CCB over what was alleged on the television program.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds, a unit of RJR Nabisco Inc., said she had not seen the Belli-Gauthier lawsuit. She said that if its claims are based on what was reported on ABC's Day One program, the suit will not be successful.

The spokeswoman said the program claimed tobacco companies inject cigarettes with nicotine to make them more addictive. She said the opposite is true.

She said the process which was alleged to inject nicotine is called reconstituting tobacco sheets. She said cigarettes made with reconstituted tobacco sheets are 30% lower in nicotine than those made with leaf.

The spokeswoman said the company does not add nicotine to its products. She said the production process causes cigarettes to lose nicotine.

She also pointed to a Surgeon General's report, which she said stated the nicotine content in cigarettes has declined 60% over the last 40 years.

She also said RJR is considering a lawsuit against ABC.

8:39 AM

The Wall Street Journal reported that the other companies named in the suit were American Tobacco Co., Liggett Group Inc. and Lorillard Inc., a unit of Loews Corp.

American Tobacco declined comment. Liggett and Lorillard couldn't be reached for comment.

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Opinion; PART-M; Opinion Desk

LOS ANGELES TIMES INTERVIEW Patrick Reynolds A Famous Tobacco Name Now Fights the Smoking Lobby

Steve Proffitt
Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox News and contributor to National Public Radio's "Morning Edition" and "All Things Considered." He interviewed Patrick Reynolds at his home in Beverly Hills.
2,046 words
5 June 1994
Los Angeles Times
Home
3

 The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1994  

The ashtray may soon be a collector's item. The nation's 50 million smokers are feeling like an oppressed minority. Tobacco-control advocates have snuffed out cigarettes in airplanes, theaters, ball parks and shopping malls. Many cities prohibit smoking in restaurants and other public places.

Congress is now considering a hefty tax increase on cigarettes, a nationwide workplace smoking ban and legislation to put the sale and manufacture of tobacco products under the regulation of the Food and Drug Administration. The states of Florida and Mississippi are suing tobacco companies to recover costs of treating diseases caused by smoking. Even the military, home of "Smoke 'em if you've got 'em," has prohibited puffing in all but a few designated areas. To paraphrase a famous cigarette ad: We've come a long way, baby.

These accomplishments to curb tobacco use are even more remarkable considering the strength of the tobacco industry. The tobacco lobby is one of the most powerful and well-funded-in 1991, tobacco interests spent $2.7 million on lobbying and campaign contributions in California alone. That lobby reflects the earning power of the business-in 1992, a tobacco and food conglomerate, Philip Morris, was the most profitable in America, with nearly two-thirds of its almost $5 billion in profit coming from tobacco sales.

One of tobacco's most vocal foes wears one of its most familiar names. In 1911, R.J. Reynolds created Camel cigarettes-the fastest-selling brand in the country today. And R.J.'s grandson, Patrick Reynolds, 45, works full time as a lecturer and crusader against the cigarette industry-financing his ventures, in part, with an inheritance rooted in the tobacco fields of North Carolina.

When Reynolds was a teen-ager, his father died of emphysema. Even that didn't stop the young Reynolds from taking up the tobacco habit. He finally kicked it in the mid-'80s, after selling all his tobacco stock. In 1986, he shocked his family by testifying on Capitol Hill in favor of a ban on cigarette advertising, and quickly became a spokesperson for the growing tobacco-control movement.

Before finding his calling as an anti-smoking crusader, Reynolds was an aspiring actor. He uses his thespian skills and his famous name to hold the media's attention and keep tobacco executives' feet to the fire. He works out of a modest home in Beverly Hills, where he talked about the tobacco industry's impressive political power and his vision of a smoke-free America.

*

Question: There has been all this activity-congressional hearings, FDA proposals to regulate smoking, workplace smoking bans. Have we reached some sort of critical mass in the anti-smoking movement?

Answer: I really hope so. I've been calling for FDA regulation of cigarettes for a long time, and now we have an FDA administrator, David Kessler, who's saying the same thing. He says he's prepared to show that cigarette manufacturers manipulate the levels of nicotine in their products, and he's waiting for a mandate from Congress.

The greatest thing that will come out of FDA regulation is that manufacturers will have to print the ingredients on the packs-so that people will know what chemicals they are ingesting when they smoke. Meanwhile, Rep. Henry Waxman D-Los Angeles has a bill to ban smoking in the workplace. That would be a national ban, and, of course, the tobacco industry is fighting it tooth and nail, with all their power and might.

But the core issue, as I see it, is the power of the tobacco lobby . . . . Look what they have achieved. America has the lowest cigarette tax of any industrialized country in the world. It averages about 50 cents a pack; in Canada, it's $3.26 a pack. We've failed to ban cigarette advertising-cigarettes are the most heavily advertised product in America. The tobacco industry is spending somewhere around $4 billion a year to associate smoking with images of health and beauty and romance. Cigarette advertising is the greatest lie in history. They're spending $15 per person, for every man, woman and child in this country, to promote smoking. And they spend freely to make sure an advertising ban will never make it out of committee in Congress.

They are very much around at the local level, too. The tobacco lobby sends slick lawyers into state capitals to get watered-down anti-smoking legislation passed that preempts many of the local anti-smoking ordinances we have worked so hard to put into law.

Exporting of cigarettes to Asia-again the special interests are responsible for that, for hundreds of millions of people becoming addicted in those countries.

Back in the 1980s, Sen. Jesse Helms went to see President Reagan, and said, "We've got a balance-of-payments problem here, Ron; how come we can't sell American cigarettes in some of these foreign markets?" So Reagan got the government to start pressing the Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, Japan and said, "If you don't lower your tariffs on our cigarettes, we're going to slap trade penalties on you."

Those governments caved in, lowered their import taxes on cigarettes, and then the American tobacco industry began a full-scale ad campaign in those countries. Partly as a result, smoking has increased 70% around the world since 1968. So while people think we are somehow winning the battle against smoking, we're actually losing when you look at it worldwide . . . . But the real critical mass-the paradigm shift-may be political. For years, politicians have been able to accept huge amounts of money from the tobacco lobby, and vote to support the lobby's interests, while escaping the wrath of the public. But with so much attention on the issue of smoking, they can't still look good and vote with the tobacco lobby.

Q: What sort of regulation would you like to see on the sale and marketing of cigarettes?

A: Appropriate regulation-regulation that at least duplicates what's going on in other countries. We should have the warning label on the front of the pack, as Canada requires. Ban advertising and raise taxes, as Canada has done. The difference between the Canadian government and ours? It's the power of the special interests and the money that goes into the hands of the politicians.

Another important regulation would raise the age for purchasing cigarettes to 21. It would require merchants to have a license to sell cigarettes, just like liquor. There are statistics which really make the case for this-of all smokers, 60% start by the age of 14 years old, and 90% by the age of 19. That means only one smoker in 10 starts after the age of 19. If we can keep cigarettes away from kids until they reach 21, we could go a long way toward eliminating the problem. So the purchase of cigarettes must be regulated as seriously as alcohol. This means banning vending machines as well. You can't buy a beer in a vending machine. But vending machines are how children are getting cigarettes.

Q: What sort of a tax would you like to see applied to cigarettes?

A: The direct medical costs related to smoking is $22 billion a year. If you divide that by the number of packs of cigarettes sold every year, the figure comes out to $2.17 of direct medical costs per pack. So, at the very least, the tax should pay for the cost of smoking.

But let me make a somewhat radical proposal. I believe that the future of tobacco control may lie in nationalizing the tobacco companies. This means that the government would pay an appropriate, or perhaps an inappropriate price for the tobacco companies and from that point forward, all the profits would go to Uncle Sam. Imagine how much easier the job of tobacco control would be if there was no more money spent on lobbyists. I am not a socialist. As a rule, I don't believe in nationalizing industries, but tobacco is an exception: It's the only product sold which, when used as intended, causes death.

Q: Where do the 54 million people who smoke fit into this debate? Don't we need to focus on them at some point?

A: Yes, but I will tell you candidly that we have limited dollars-and it costs a lot more to get someone to stop smoking than it does to educate children not to ever start smoking. It's vastly more costly to get addicts off cigarettes. I don't think we can ignore or neglect the issue of smoking cessation, however. And I think the tobacco industry's assertion that smokers have choice sounds good, but how much of a choice do smokers really have when cigarettes are as addicting as heroin?

I do believe that if under Clinton's health-care program, employers are going to pay for the health care of their employees, then smoking cessation programs should be included in the national health-care program.

Q: Do you believe people have a right to smoke and, if so, what rights do they have?

A: Smoker's have a right to smoke, but the right of nonsmokers to breathe clean air supersedes the right of smokers. So it is very appropriate to ban smoking in the workplace, in public places like restaurants and airports, in enclosed spaces where people have to breathe. But I don't believe in a cigarette prohibition. The tobacco industry would love to have tobacco-control advocates such as myself take the position that cigarettes should be banned, because then they could call us zealots or fanatics , and dismiss us. I take a moderate and what I feel is an appropriate position.

Q: What about Hollywood? While cigarettes have disappeared almost entirely from television, there's still a lot of smoking in the movies. Are you trying to do anything about that?

A: Yes, and I think we need to do something to encourage stars like Wynona Rider from chain-smoking throughout a movie like "Reality Bites." We should encourage her to argue with her producers and say, "Hey, I don't want my character to smoke; I may be a role model for young women, and the last thing I want them to do is smoke cigarettes." If Wynona Rider had the courage to do that, it could make a difference. Perhaps she's taken an unfair beating for smoking in that movie, but that may be the kind of pressure we have to put on stars to make them refuse to smoke in movies.

And here's something that's never been printed, as far as I know. I have it on very good authority that the firm U.S. Tobacco financed a movie called "Pure Country." In that movie, all the cowboy heroes chewed tobacco, and it was financed by the company most responsible for producing chewing tobacco.

Q: Some years ago, you talked about achieving a smoke-free America by the year 2000. It seemed like an outrageous idea just a few years ago, and now it's seeming to be something that might almost be achievable. When do you think you can put yourself out of business?

A: I don't think I will be out of business in my lifetime. With hundreds of millions of addicts around the world, there will always be plenty of work for tobacco-control advocates. I always point out that, a few years ago, we thought we'd never get smoking off airplanes, and today we and wonder if it was really true that there ever was smoking on airplanes. So one day we are going to look back and say, "You mean, people used to actually smoke?" That day is coming, that's a promise.*

PHOTO: Patrick Reynolds / J. ALBERT DIAZ / Los Angeles Times

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SUNDAY READER
INTERVIEW

Patrick Reynolds INTERVIEW Patrick Reynolds

1,124 words
3 July 1994
The Dallas Morning News
HOME FINAL
1J

 

The ashtray may soon be a collector's item. The nation's 50 million smokers are feeling like an oppressed minority. Tobacco-control advocates have snuffed out cigarettes in airplanes, theaters, ballparks and shopping malls. Many cities prohibit smoking in restaurants and other public places.

Congress is considering a hefty tax increase on cigarettes, a nationwide workplace smoking ban and legislation to put the sale and manufacture of tobacco products under the regulation of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The states of Florida and Mississippi are suing tobacco companies, trying to recover costs of treating disease caused by smoking.

These efforts to curb tobacco use are even more remarkable considering the strength of the tobacco industry. The tobacco lobby reflects the earning power of the business - in 1992, Philip Morris was the most profitable business in America, netting almost $5 billion.

One of tobacco's most vocal foes wears one of its most familiar names. In 1911, R.J. Reynolds created Camel cigarettes - today the fastest-selling brand in the country. And today R.J.'s grandson, Patrick Reynolds, 45, crusades full time against the cigarette industry - financing his ventures in part with an inheritance rooted in the tobacco fields of North Carolina.

When Patrick Reynolds was a teen-ager, his father died of emphysema. Even that didn't stop the young Reynolds from taking up the tobacco habit. He kicked it in the mid-'80s, after selling all his tobacco stock. In 1986, he shocked his family by testifying on Capitol Hill in favor of a ban on cigarette advertising.

Before finding his calling as an anti-smoking crusader, Mr. Reynolds was an aspiring actor. He uses his thespian skills and his famous name to keep tobacco executives' feet to the fire. He works out of a modest home in Beverly Hills, Calif., where he talked with Steve Proffitt, a producer for Fox News and a contributor to National Public Radio's Morning Edition and All Things Considered. The following are excerpts:

Q: There's been all this activity - congressional hearings, FDA proposals to regulate smoking. Have we reached some sort of critical mass in the anti-smoking movement?

A: I really hope so. I've been calling for FDA regulation of cigarettes for a long time, and now we have an FDA administrator, David Kessler, who's saying the same thing. He says he's prepared to show that cigarette manufacturers manipulate the levels of nicotine in their products, and he's waiting for a mandate from Congress.

The greatest thing that will come out of FDA regulation is that manufacturers will have to print the ingredients on the packs - so that people will know what chemicals they are ingesting when they smoke. Meanwhile, Rep. Henry Waxman D-Calif. has a bill to ban smoking in the workplace. That would be a national ban, and, of course, the tobacco industry is fighting it tooth and nail, with all their power and might.

But the core issue as I see it is the power of the tobacco lobby. It's a microcosm of what's going on on a larger scale. The special interests have often kept from being passed legislation which is in the best interest of the public health. So we have to get rid of the power of the special interests.

Q: What sort of regulation would you like to see on the sale and marketing of cigarettes?

A: Appropriate regulation - regulation which at least duplicates what's going on in other countries. We should have the warning label on the front of the pack, as Canada requires. Ban advertising and raise taxes, as Canada has done. The difference between the Canadian government and ours? It's the power of the special interests and the money that goes into the hands of the politicians.

Another important regulation would raise the age for purchasing cigarettes to 21. It would require merchants to have a license to sell cigarettes, just like liquor. There are statistics which really make the case for this - of all smokers, 60 percent start by the age of 14 years old, and 90 percent by the age of 19. That means only one smoker in 10 starts after the age of 19. If we can keep cigarettes away from kids until they reach 21, we could go a long way toward eliminating the problem. So the purchase of cigarettes must be regulated as seriously as alcohol. This means banning vending machines as well. You can't buy a beer in a vending machine. But vending machines are how children are getting cigarettes.

Q: Where do the 54 million people who smoke fit into this debate?

A: I will tell you candidly that we have limited dollars - and it costs a lot more to get someone to stop smoking than it does to educate children not to ever start smoking. It's vastly more costly to get addicts off cigarettes. I don't think we can ignore or neglect the issue of smoking cessation, however. And I think the tobacco industry's assertion that smokers have choice sounds good, but how much of a choice do smokers really have when cigarettes are as addicting as heroin?

Q: Do you believe people have a right to smoke, and if so what rights do they have?

A: Smokers have a right to smoke, but the right of non-smokers to breathe clean air supersedes the right of smokers. So it is very appropriate to ban smoking in the workplace, in public places like restaurants and airports, in enclosed spaces where people have to breathe. But I don't believe in a cigarette prohibition.

Q: Some years ago you talked about achieving a smoke-free America by the year 2000. It seemed like an outrageous idea just a few years ago, and now it's seeming to be something that might almost be achievable. When do you think you can put yourself out of business?

A: I don't think I will be out of business in my lifetime. With hundreds of millions of addicts around the world, there will always be plenty of work for tobacco-control advocates. In my lectures I always point out that, a few years ago, we thought we'd never get smoking off airplanes, and today we look back and wonder if it was really true that there ever was smoking on airplanes. So one day we are going to look back and say, "You mean people used to actually smoke?" That day is coming, and that's a promise.

PHOTOS: File photo Patrick Reynolds. ; PHOTO LOCATION: Disk 32b / NB_Patrick Reynolds 5 cf 68542.

Document dal0000020011210dq7301p48

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Namesake of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Founder Dies

254 words
11 July 1994
The Associated Press

. The Associated Press.

PINEHURST, N.C. AP - Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson and the namesake of the tobacco company's founder, is dead at age 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night. R.J. Reynolds III died June 28 in Pinehurst.

His physician, Dr. Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer who was not at his office Monday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. It is the nation's second-largest tobacco company.

Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

R.J. Reynolds III founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He also produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

He also founded the Sufi Institute in New Mexico. The Sufi Foundation camp is located near Torreon, N.M., in the mountains about 40 miles southeast of Albuquerque.

The foundation based its beliefs on the Muslim movement of Sufism that emerged in the late 10th and early 11th centuries. About 500 of the 5,000 members annually attended a two-month summer camp.

Reynolds' wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

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DEATHS ELSEWHERE

144 words
12 July 1994
the Charleston Gazette
P2C

 

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson and the namesake of the tobacco company's founder, is dead in Pinehurst, N.C., at age 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night. R.J. Reynolds III died June 28 in Pinehurst.

His physician, Dr. Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer who was not at his office Monday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. It is the nation's second-largest tobacco company.

Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

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METRO

R.J. REYNOLDS, 60, HAS DIED

70 words
12 July 1994
Dayton Daily News
CITY
4B

 

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, 60, grandson of the founder of the nation's second-largest tobacco company, is dead.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds said Mr. Reynolds died June 28 in Pinehurst of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night. His wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

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NATIONAL

R.J. REYNOLDS III, PHILANTHROPIST

The Associated Press
181 words
12 July 1994
Sun-Sentinel Ft. Lauderdale
SPORTS FINAL
6B

 

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, the grandson of the founder of the nation's second-largest tobacco company, is dead at age 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night. R.J. Reynolds died June 28 in Pinehurst.

His physician, Dr. Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer who was not at his office on Monday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment.

Mr. Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

Mr. Reynolds founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He also produced the film Siddhartha, based on a Herman Hesse novel.

Mr. Reynolds' wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

 

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TRIAD/STATE

GRANDSON OF R.J. REYNOLDS DIES AT AGE 60

The Associated Press
184 words
12 July 1994
Greensboro News & Record
CITY/HIGH POINT
B3

 

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson of the founder of the nation's second-largest tobacco company, is dead at age 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night.

R.J. Reynolds died June 28 in Pinehurst.

His physician, Dr. Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer who was not at his office Monday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment.

Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder.

No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

R.J. Reynolds III founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He also produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

Reynolds' wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

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OBITUARIES

NAMESAKE OF R.J. REYNOLDS FOUNDER DIES

The Associated Press
252 words
12 July 1994
Portland Oregonian
FOURTH
B04


Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson and the namesake of the tobacco company's founder, is dead at age 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night. R.J. Reynolds III died June 28 in Pinehurst.

His physician, Dr. Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer who was not at his office Monday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. It is the nation's second-largest tobacco company.

Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

R.J. Reynolds III founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He also produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

He also founded the Sufi Institute in New Mexico. The Sufi Foundation camp is located near Torreon, N.M., in the mountains about 40 miles southeast of Albuquerque.

The foundation based its beliefs on the Muslim movement of Sufism that emerged in the late 10th and early 11th centuries. About 500 of the 5,000 members annually attended a two-month summer camp.

Reynolds' wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

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DEATHS, FUNERALS

GRANDSON OF R.J. REYNOLDS CO. FOUNDER

AP
240 words
12 July 1994
The Seattle Times
FINAL
B6

 

PINEHURST, N.C. - Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson and the namesake of the tobacco company's founder, is dead at age 60.

His half-brother Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified last night. R.J. Reynolds III died June 28 in Pinehurst.

His physician, Dr. Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer who was not at his office yesterday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. It is the nation's second-largest tobacco company.

Mr. Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the board of directors since the 1930s.

Mr. Reynolds founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He also produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

He founded the Sufi Institute in New Mexico. The Sufi Foundation camp is near Torreon, N.M., about 40 miles southeast of Albuquerque.

The foundation based its beliefs on the Muslim movement of Sufism that emerged in the late 10th and early 11th centuries. The foundation had 5,000 members.

Mr. Reynolds' wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

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NEWS

R.J. Reynolds III Grandson of firm's founder

ASSOCIATED PRESS
154 words
12 July 1994
San Francisco Examiner
FOURTH
A-13

 

PINEHURST, N.C. - Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson and the namesake of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., has died at age 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. The cause of death could not be independently verified Tuesday. Mr. Reynolds died June 28.

Mr. Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

Mr. Reynolds founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

He also founded the Sufi Institute in New Mexico. The foundation is based on beliefs from the mystical Muslim movement of Sufism.

PHOTO; Caption: Richard Joshua Reynolds III

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LOCAL

R.J. REYNOLDS III, PHILANTHROPIST, DIES

172 words
12 July 1994
Buffalo News
CITY
B6

 

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, the grandson of the founder of the nation's second-largest tobacco company, is dead at age 60.

His half brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night. Reynolds died June 28 in Pinehurst.

His physician, Dr. Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer, who was not at his office Monday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment.

Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

Reynolds founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He also produced the film "Siddharta," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

Reynolds' wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

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1, News
NEWS DIGEST: UNITED STATES

NEWS DIGEST: United States

506 words
13 July 1994
The Financial Post
Daily
2

 The Financial Post

AID FOR POOR REGIONS

Returning to a campaign pledge to put people first, the Clinton administration unveiled plans yesterday to channel federal funds into scores of communities that the economic recovery left behind. The plan would use existing federal funds to try to encourage new business opportunities in destitute rural and urban America.

TOBACCO HEIR DEAD

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said yesterday was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure at the age of 60. Patrick Reynolds said in Los Angeles that his brother, who quit in 1986 after years of heavy smoking, died on June 28 at his home in North Carolina. ''I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services,'' he said. He said he delayed the announcement also because family members were opposed to his announcing that smoking was the cause of death.

 

 

News

NEWS BRIEFING Smoking kills tobacco magnate

Reuter News Agency
175 words
13 July 1994
The Globe and Mail
A8

 .

LOS ANGELES

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R. J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said yesterday was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure.

Mr. Reynolds was 60.

Patrick Reynolds said his brother, a heavy smoker who quit in 1986, died June 28 at his home in North Carolina.

"I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services," he said. He said he also delayed the announcement because family members were opposed to his blaming smoking for the death.

"There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking," Mr. Reynolds said. "I spoke to Dr. Roy Duke, his attending physician at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla., and he confirmed that the emphysema was a direct result of years of smoking."

Patrick Reynolds' father, also named R.J., died from emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58. Reuter

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A NEWS

Emphysema strikes tobacco family

Reuters News Service
130 words
13 July 1994
Houston Chronicle
2 STAR
11

 

LOS ANGELES -- R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said Tuesday was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure at the age of 60.

Patrick Reynolds said in Los Angeles that his brother, who quit in 1986 after years of heavy smoking, died on June 28 at his home in North Carolina.

Patrick Reynolds said he delayed the announcement of his brother's death because he did not want publicity surrounding the services and because family members were opposed to his announcing that smoking was the cause of death.

Reynolds said his brother's doctor confirmed that his brother died of emphysema, "" . . . a direct result of years of smoking.''

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R.J. Reynolds III Died Of Diseases From Smoking

195 words
13 July 1994
The Wall Street Journal
C6

 c 1994, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.

NEW YORK -- R.J. Reynolds III, a grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds, died last month from smoking-related ailments, according to his brother, Patrick Reynolds.

Patrick Reynolds, an outspoken critic of the tobacco industry, said his brother Richard Joshua, 60 years old, died on June 28 from emphysema and congestive heart failure. Mr. Reynolds said his brother smoked Winston cigarettes, a Reynolds brand, for 30 years.

Roy Duke, a physician who attended Mr. Reynolds, said in an interview, "He did have very severe emphysema which was related to smoking."

Mr. Reynolds said his brother is the fifth member of the Reynolds family to die from tobacco-related sickness. Mr. Reynolds is the founder of the anti-smoking group, Citizens for a Smokefree America.

"My brother's death from smoking personalizes my campaign against cigarettes and intensifies my drive to bring about Food and Drug Administration regulation," and a higher tax on cigarettes, Mr. Reynolds said.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds, a unit of RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp., New York, said the Reynolds family has not been connected to the company for decades.

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A SECTION

R.J. REYNOLDS DEAD - SMOKING BLAMED

Reuters
290 words
13 July 1994
Orlando Sentinel
3 STAR
A5

 

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said Tuesday was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure at age 60.

Patrick Reynolds said in Los Angeles that his brother, who quit in 1986 after years of heavy smoking, died on June 28 at his home in North Carolina.

"I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services," he said. He said he delayed the announcement also because family members were opposed to his announcing that smoking was the cause of death.

Reynolds' funeral service was July 5 in Winston-Salem, N.C., and he was buried at the Bellevue Memory Gardens Cemetery in Daytona Beach on July 6, his brother said.

"There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking. I spoke to Dr. Roy Duke, his attending physician at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla., this morning and he confirmed that the emphysema was a direct result of years of smoking."

An avid anti-smoker who has testified against the tobacco industry before Congress and who formed the Los Angeles-based activist group Citizens for a Smokefree America, Patrick Reynolds said his brother had been in hospitals in Winston-Salem and West Palm Beach since January.

Reynolds' father, also named R.J. Reynolds, died from emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58.

Patrick Reynolds said most of his brother's estate would go to charities.

R.J. Reynolds was a philanthropist. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s. SEQN: 41940342

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OBITUARY
OBITUARY

Barbara Tener, 77, Chatham graduate with Colonial roots

411 words
13 July 1994
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
SOONER
b-8

 

Barbara Elizabeth McCormick Tener, 77, a former resident of Shadyside and Squirrel Hill and a descendant of several families from the Colonial era, died Tuesday of cancer at her home in South Dennis, N.J.

Mrs. Tener was a direct descendant of John Hart Jr., the oldest colonist to sign the Declaration of Independence; John Hart Sr., who in the early 1700s became one of the first graduates of Yale University and James Ewing, a general at the Battle of Valley Forge.

After attending old Chatham College, she was employed as a secretary for Thorp, Reed & Armstrong, the Downtown law firm, before she moved to Cape May County in New Jersey in 1971.

A former member of Calvary Episcopal Church, Shadyside, she is survived by two daughters, Constance T. of South Dennis, N.J. and Kathleen "Kate" Smith of New Paltz, N.Y.; two sisters, Jacqueline B. Heyward of St. Simons Island, Ga., and Margaret S. Reynolds of Ligonier; and three grandchildren.

A memorial service will be conducted at a later date in Pittsburgh. Arrangements are by Radzieta Funeral Home, 9 Hand Ave., Cape May, N.J. 00210.

------

OBITUARY

ELSEWHERE

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, 60, a grandson and the namesake of the tobacco company's founder, in Pinehurst, N.C., June 28. His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. The cause of death could not be independently verified. Mr. Reynolds was a philanthropist. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

Dr. Max Frank Baer, 81, who was associated with B'nai B'rith for 65 years -- 43 of them in staff and leadership positions -- of a heart attack Monday in Washington, D.C. He retired in 1977 as the international director of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization, which he had run since 1948.

Gary Kildall, 52, a pioneering computer scientist who created the first popular operating system for personal computers, Monday in Monterey, Calif. An autopsy performed yesterday failed to determine the cause of death. While teaching computer science at the U.S. Naval Posgraduate School in Montery in 1973, Kildall wrote a personal computer operating system, which controlled the way the central processing unit stored and retrieved information from a floppy disk drive. He named the program Control Program/Monitor, or CP/M.

LIB2

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OBITUARY
OBITUARY

R.J. Reynolds III, 60, tobacco heir, publisher

The Associated Press
211 words
13 July 1994
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
REGION
b-8

 

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson and the namesake of the tobacco company's founder, died June 28. He was 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. The cause of death could not be independently verified.

Mr. Reynolds was a philanthropist. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

R.J. Reynolds III founded Full Sky Publishing, and also produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

He founded the Sufi Institute in New Mexico, which bases its beliefs on the Muslim movement of Sufism that emerged in the late 10th and early 11th centuries.

------

OBITUARY

Alexandra Dukakis, 92, singer, actress's mother

By The Associated Press

MONTCLAIR, N.J.

Alexandra Dukakis, mother of Academy Award-winning actress Olympia Dukakis, died Saturday at age 92.

The elder Dukakis sang with the Arlington Philharmonic in Massachusetts for 20 years before moving to New Jersey in 1976, where she was active in the Whole Theater Company in Montclair.

Her daughter, Olympia, won an Oscar in 1987 as best supporting actress in the film "Moonstruck."

LIB2

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OBITUARY

Lung, heart ailments claim tobacco heir

Associated Press
201 words
13 July 1994
Rocky Mountain News
FINAL
57a

 

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, has died of emphysema and congestive heart failure at the age of 60 at his home in North Carolina, his brother said Tuesday. Patrick Reynolds said his brother, who gave up smoking in 1986, died on June 28.

"There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking," Reynolds said. "I spoke to Dr. Roy Duke, his attending physician at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla., this morning, and he confirmed that the emphysema was a direct result of years of smoking," he said.

Reynolds said other family members had been against his announcing that smoking was the real cause of death. "So that's another reason why I delayed the announcement."

Mr. Reynolds' father, also R.J. Reynolds, died from emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58.

* ALEXANDRA DUKAKIS, mother of Academy Award-winning actress Olympia Dukakis, died Saturday in Montclair, N.J., at age 92. The elder Dukakis sang with the Arlington Philharmonic in Massachusetts for 20 years before moving to New Jersey in 1976.

Photo; Caption: R.J. Reynolds.

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TAMPA TODAY

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Series: DEATHS ELSEWHERE

313 words
13 July 1994
St. Petersburg Times
TAMPA
7B

 

RICHARD JOSHUA REYNOLDS III, 60, the grandson of the founder of the nation's second-largest tobacco company, died June 28 in Pinehurst, N.C. His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. The cause of death could not be independently verified. A spokeswoman for R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. Mr. Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

LARS-ERIC LINDBLAD, 67, an explorer, conservationist and pioneering travel agent who took tourists to far-flung corners of the world, died Friday in Stockholm, Sweden, of a heart attack. He was the founder of Creative Travel Ltd. and Lindblad Travel. In January 1966, he led a group of tourists to Antarctica. A year later, he organized a tourist cruise to the Galapagos Islands. In 1978, he organized cruises along the coast of China.

HAROLD MARTIN, 83, a war correspondent who received the Bronze Star, died Sunday in Atlanta of respiratory failure. He covered three wars for the Saturday Evening Post and later was a columnist for the Atlanta Constitution. He co-authored Soldier: The Memoirs of Matthew B. Ridgway with the Army general and wrote History of Georgia.

A. KENNETH PYE, 62, former Southern Methodist University president, died of cancer Monday in Colorado. Mr. Pye, who led the Dallas school back from one of the worst collegiate athletic scandals, died less than three weeks after resigning because of illness. He left Duke University for SMU in 1987, six months after the NCAA imposed its so-called "death penalty" after finding extensive involvement by SMU in a "pay for play" scandal. SMU resumed football in 1989.

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BUSINESS

Smoking kills U.S. tobacco heir

REUTER
210 words
13 July 1994
The Toronto Star
Final
C1

 The Toronto Star

LOS ANGELES Reuter - R. J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R. J. Reynolds tobacco company, has died of emphysema and congestive heart failure at age 60.

``There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking,'' his brother Patrick Reynolds said.

A former pack-a-day smoker, Patrick Reynolds now is an avid anti-smoker who has testified against the tobacco industry on Capitol Hill and who formed the Los Angeles-based activist group, Citizens for a Smokefree America.

Reynolds told a Brock University audience last year that his grandfather, mother and father all died from smoking-related diseases.

His brother, who gave up smoking in 1986, died on June 28 at his home in North Carolina, he said yesterday.

``I spoke to Dr. Roy Duke, his attending physician at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla., this morning and he confirmed that the emphysema was a direct result of years of smoking,'' he said.

Patrick Reynolds said other family members had been against his announcing that smoking was the real cause of death.

He made the announcement yesterday because he was holding a memorial service for his brother in Los Angeles, he said.

*** Infomart-Online ***

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B;BUSINESS ROUNDUP

Dollar staggers but bounces back

FROM WIRE DISPATCHES AND STAFF REPORTS
583 words
13 July 1994
The Washington Times
2
B7

 

Dollar staggers but bounces back

NEW YORK - The dollar set another 50-year low against the Japanese yen yesterday but recovered to close at 97.50 yen. The Dow Jones industrial average closed at 3,702.66, down 0.33 points, after dropping nearly 30 points at midday. The Nasdaq index rose 2.07 to 708.90, the American Stock Exchange index rose 0.73 to 425.50, and the S&P 500 fell 0.11 to 447.95. The yield on the benchmark 30-year bond slipped to 7.68 percent.

Inflation held in check

Inflation remained under control in June as prices paid to factories, farmers and other producers unexpectedly showed no change, Labor Department figures showed. It was the third straight month without an increase. The core rate of the Producer Price Index, which excludes volatile food and energy costs, actually declined 0.1 percent.

Continental offers seniors savings

Continental Airlines said yesterday it is offering a program for people age 65 and older with potential savings of up to 75 percent off coach fares for off-peak travel in all 50 states, as well as to Latin America and the Caribbean. The tickets purchased under the program can be used for one-way travel, require no advance purchase and are fully refundable. Continental also cut fares from Newark and La Guardia to Florida to as low as $79 each way.

Schwab drops reinvestment fees

NEW YORK - Charles Schwab Corp. plans to eliminate the fees it charges clients who reinvest dividend payments, a company spokesman said. The San Francisco discount broker now imposes a fee of 3.5 percent or $3.50 - whichever is lower - to customers who reinvest dividends of less than $250. The fees will be eliminated Aug. 15.

Food Lion irks cigarette makers

RALEIGH, N.C. - Tobacco industry officials are urging growers to protest the Food Lion supermarket chain's decision to ban employee smoking at all company buildings effective Sept. 1. "We're hoping that the tobacco growers and supporters who shop at Food Lion will make themselves known," said Lisa Eddington, managing director for the Tobacco Growers Information Committee.

Mattel wins Scrabble scramble

LOS ANGELES - Mattel Corp., maker of Barbie dolls and other best-selling toys, won the right yesterday to market the popular Scrabble board game outside North America. Mattel said it received commitments to acquire more than 50 percent of the shares of British board game producer J.W. Spear & Sons, outbidding rival Hasbro Inc., which markets Scrabble in the United States and Canada.

RJR heir succumbs to emphysema

LOS ANGELES - R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, has died of emphysema and congestive heart failure at the age of 60 at his home in North Carolina, his brother said yesterday. Patrick Reynolds said his brother, who gave up smoking in 1986, died on June 28. "I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services," he said.

Duke Power workers quit early

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Duke Power Co., the electric utility serving the Piedmont areas of North and South Carolina, said yesterday some 1,200 employees will leave the company under a voluntary separation program. The departures will reduce Duke Power's labor costs. The departing employees will get at least six months' pay, Duke Power said.

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NEWS

R.J. REYNOLDS HEIR DIED OF EMPHYSEMA, KIN SAYS

Reuters.
377 words
13 July 1994
Chicago Tribune
NORTH SPORTS FINAL; N
3

 

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said Tuesday was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure at the age of 60.

Patrick Reynolds said in Los Angeles that his brother, who in 1986 quit smoking after years of heavy smoking, died June 28 at his home in North Carolina.

"I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services," he said. He said he also delayed because family members were opposed to his announcing that smoking was the cause of death.

"So that's another reason why I delayed the announcement. I didn't want there to be any bad feelings at the family services," he said.

"There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking. I spoke to Dr. Roy Duke, his attending physician at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beac this morning, and he confirmed that the emphysema was a direct result of years of smoking."

Reynolds said he had chosen to make the announcement Tuesday because he was holding a memorial service for his brother in Los Angeles.

An avid anti-smoker who has testified against the tobacco industry before Congress and who formed the Los Angeles-based activist group Citizens for a Smokefree America, Patrick Reynolds said his brother had been in hospitals in Winston- Salem, N.C., and West Palm Beach since January.

"For most of those months he remained extremely weak, unable to speak and able to take only a few occasional steps for exercise," he said.

Reynolds' father, also named R.J. Reynolds, died from emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58.

Reynolds described his brother as "a shy and intensely private man who preferred to avoid the limelight. His interests ranged from writing poetry to raising thoroughbred horses. He gave generously to a variety of charities."

The funeral service was held July 5 in Winston-Salem and Reynolds was buried at the Bellevue Memory Gardens Cemetery in Daytona Beach, Fla., last Wednesday, his brother said. He said most of his brother's estate would go to charities.

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International News

Smokes killed brother: Reynolds Reuter

Data Stream
238 words
13 July 1994
Winnipeg Free Press

 .

LOS ANGELES - R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said yesterday was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure.

R.J. Reynolds was 60.

Patrick Reynolds said his brother, a heavy smoker who quit in 1986, died June 28 at his home in North Carolina. ''I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services,'' he said. He said he also delayed the announcement because family members were opposed to his blaming smoking for his death. ''There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking,'' Reynolds said. ''I spoke to Dr. Roy Duke, his attending physician at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla., and he confirmed that the emphysema was a direct result of years of smoking.'' Reynolds said he was making the announcement yesterday because he was holding a memorial service for his brother in Los Angeles.

An avid anti-smoker who has testified against the tobacco industry before Congress and who formed the Los Angeles-based activist group Citizens for a Smokefree America, Reynolds said his brother had been in hospitals in Winston Salem and West Palm Beach since January.

Reynolds's father, also named R.J., died from emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58.

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NEWS

SMOKING BLAMED IN R.J. REYNOLDS DEATH

1994, Reuters News Service
138 words
13 July 1994
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
FIVE STAR
04B

 

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said Tuesday was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure at age 60.

Patrick Reynolds said in Los Angeles that his brother, who quit in 1986 after years of heavy smoking, died on June 28 at his home in North Carolina. The funeral was July 5 and burial July 6.

"I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services," Patrick Reynolds said. He said he delayed the announcement also because family members opposed his disclosure that smoking was the cause of death.

"I didn't want bad feelings at the family services," he said.

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LOCAL

R.J. REYNOLDS DIED LAST WEEK OF EMPHYSEMA, BROTHER SAYS

277 words
13 July 1994
Buffalo News
FIRST
B6

 

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, has died of emphysema and congestive heart failure at age 60 at his home in North Carolina, his brother said Tuesday.

Patrick Reynolds said his brother, who gave up smoking in 1986, died on June 28.

"I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services," he said.

Reynolds' funeral was held July 5 in Winston-Salem, N.C., and he was buried at the Bellevue Memory Gardens Cemetery in Daytona Beach, Fla., on July 6, Patrick Reynolds said.

"There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking," Reynolds said.

"I spoke to Dr. Roy Duke, his attending physician at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla., this morning and he confirmed that the emphysema was a direct result of years of smoking," he said.

Reynolds said other family members had been against him announcing that smoking was the real cause of death.

Reynolds said he had chosen to make the announcement Tuesday because he was holding a memorial service for his brother in Los Angeles.

Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist who has testified against the tobacco industry on Capitol Hill and who formed the Los Angeles-based activist group, Citizens for a Smokefree America, said his brother had been hospitalized in Winston-Salem and West Palm Beach since January.

Reynolds' father, also R.J. Reynolds, died of emphysema in 1964 at 58.

He said most of his brother's estate would go to charities.

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PART-A; Metro Desk

Richard J. Reynolds III; Tobacco Family Grandson

From Associated Press
207 words
13 July 1994
Los Angeles Times
Home
16

 The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1994  

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, a grandson and the namesake of the tobacco company's founder, is dead at age 60.

His half-brother, anti-smoking activist Patrick Reynolds, said the namesake Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. R. J. Reynolds III died June 28 in Pinehurst.

A spokeswoman for R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. It is the nation's second-largest tobacco company.

No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

R. J. Reynolds III founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers, and produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a Herman Hesse novel.

He also founded the Sufi Institute in New Mexico. The Sufi Foundation camp is located near Torreon, N.M., in the mountains about 40 miles southeast of Albuquerque.

The foundation based its beliefs on the Muslim movement of Sufism that emerged in the late 10th and early 11th centuries. About 500 of the 5,000 members annually attended a two-month summer camp.

Reynolds' wife, Marie, died earlier this year. They had no children.

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CONNECTICUT

R.J. REYNOLDS III; GRANDSON OF TOBACCO COMPANY'S FOUNDER

Associated Press
192 words
13 July 1994
The Hartford Courant
STATEWIDE
C10

 @ The Hartford Courant 1994

Richard Joshua Reynolds III, grandson and namesake of the tobacco company's founder, is dead at age 60.

His half-brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. He died June 28 in Pinehurst.

The cause of death could not be independently verified Monday night.

Mr. Reynolds' physician, Robert Chin, a Winston-Salem pulmonary medicine specialist, referred calls to a family lawyer, who was not at his office Monday evening.

A spokeswoman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. It is the nation's second-largest tobacco company.

No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

Mr. Reynolds founded Full Sky Publishing, a company dedicated to publishing work by young writers. He also produced the film "Siddhartha," based on a novel by Herman Hesse.

He also founded the Sufi Institute in New Mexico. The Sufi Foundation camp is near Torreon, N.M., in the mountains about 40 miles southeast of Albuquerque.

SEND} YES

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ROB Column

MARKET WATCH Never say die: tobacco fights back

DOUGLAS GOOLD
789 words
14 July 1994
The Globe and Mail
B9

 .

WHAT a tragedy it is when a family member dies from smoking-related diseases. What an irony it is when that family member is R. J. Reynolds III, a grandson of the founder of R. J. Reynolds, the second-largest tobacco company in the United States and part of RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp..

The Wall Street Journal reports that the 60-year-old Mr. Reynolds smoked Winston cigarettes for 30 years, and quotes his doctor as saying, "He did have very severe emphysema which was related to smoking." Brother Patrick Reynolds, the founder of Citizens for a Smokefree America, said his brother was the fifth member of the family - which is no longer connected to the company - to die from tobacco-related problems.

The tobacco industry is under siege from all sides, as never before. U.S. federal excise taxes are poised to increase, probably by 50 or 60 cents U.S. a pack. Florida and Massachusetts have just passed laws to enable them to sue for recovery of funds spent to treat tobacco-related health problems. Other states are considering similar measures. States, municipalities and corporations are severely restricting the number of places left to smokers to puff away. Congressional committees are grilling industry executives over allegations that their companies "spiked" cigarettes with nicotine in order to increase their addictiveness - and the stories are running on the front page of The New York Times. The Joe Camel character is being taken to court for an ad campaign that is alleged to encourage minors to smoke.

Has the industry seen the writing on the wall and put up the white flag? It has not. Cigarette companies, loath in the past to raise their faces above the parapet, have been running aggressive, full-page ads in leading publications.

"Some politicians want to ban cigarettes," runs the caption under a photo of a man smoking, in an ad produced by R. J. Reynolds. Beside it is a photo of another man with a glass of beer, with the caption: "Will alcohol be next?" That's followed by a woman with a coffee cup - "Will caffeine be next? - and finally by a man eating a hamburger - "Will high- fat foods be next?" The text suggests books, movies and music could also "get the treatment."

"We're glad they're fighting back," comments Prudential Securities analyst Leigh Ferst in a June 27 report on Philip Morris, the industry leader.

Of course, we all know that in these health-conscious days cigarette companies are going the way of the dodo bird - it's only a matter of time. The companies are discredited and their products are harmful. Unfortunately, this glib and comforting assessment is not entirely accurate.

Philip Morris released its second-quarter earnings on Tuesday, and surprised everyone. Surprised everyone, that is, with how good they were the stock dropped slightly, because it had already run up in price. And what was the key to the higher profits? The company's Miller beer division? Kraft Foods? Wrong: It was tobacco.

"Our worldwide tobacco business has never been in better shape," said chief executive officer Geoffrey Bible. Led by tobacco, Philip Morris made a three-month profit of $1.23-billion U.S., which is almost double what Canada's most profitable company Bell Canada made for the whole of 1993.

Cigarette sales rose both in the United States and internationally, with volumes ahead a whopping 18 per cent worldwide to 187 billion. That's a lot of puffing. Marlboro, the world's leading brand, has clearly recovered from the price cuts of "Marlboro Friday" in April, 1993, increasing its share of the U.S. market to a record 28.5 per cent. Obviously, cigarettes are price-sensitive. Financial World magazine recently ranked Marlboro as the world's second most valuable brand at $33- billion, behind Coca-Cola.

While most stock analysts are too worried about political and regulatory risk to recommend the company's stock, Prudential Securities argues that the risk has been discounted, and rates it a buy.

Philip Morris appears poised to continue with its aggressive counterattacks. Critics, including the powerful California Public Employees Retirement System and the Teamsters, support splitting the company into separate food/beer and cigarette units, to segregate the liabilities connected with the cigarette business. The meeting they had scheduled with management for Tuesday was postponed indefinitely at the last minute.

Instead of splitting up the company, management seems intent upon winning over dissidents through a continuing stock buyback scheme or an increased dividend, or both.

Whatever transpires, it's clear that this is one company that will not go gentle into that good night.

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TAMPA BAY AND STATE

DEATHS Series: DEATHS

457 words
14 July 1994
St. Petersburg Times
CITY
5B

 

GARY KILDALL, 52, who created the first popular operating system for personal computers, died Monday in Monterey, Calif. In 1973, Mr. Kildall wrote his personal computer operating system, Control Program-Monitor, a fundamental program that controls how information is stored and retrieved from a floppy disc drive. To sell it, he and Dorothy McEwen, then his wife, formed in 1974 a company that came to be known as Digital Research. In 1980, Mr. Kildall was approached by IBM to develop the operating system for its personal computers. He thought he had struck a deal, but IBM later met with William Gates, founder of the then-small software company Microsoft Corp. IBM eventually offered personal computers with the CP-M operating system from Digital Research and MS-DOS from Microsoft. But it priced Microsoft's version at $40 and Digital's at $240. MS-DOS eventually became the industry standard. Gates is ranked as one of the richest men in the United States.

RICHARD JOSHUA REYNOLDS III, 60, the grandson of the founder of the nation's second-largest tobacco company, died June 28 in Pinehurst, N.C. His half brother, Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist, said Mr. Reynolds died of emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. The cause of death could not be independently verified. A spokeswoman for R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Peggy Carter, said the company had no comment. Mr. Reynolds was a philanthropist and namesake of the tobacco company's founder. No family member has served on the company's board of directors since the 1930s.

LARS-ERIC LINDBLAD, 67, an explorer, conservationist and pioneering travel agent who took tourists to far-flung corners of the world, died Friday in Stockholm, Sweden, of a heart attack. He was the founder of Creative Travel Ltd. and Lindblad Travel. In January 1966, he led a group of tourists to Antarctica. A year later, he organized a tourist cruise to the Galapagos Islands. In 1978, he organized cruises along the coast of China.

ALEXANDRA DUKAKIS, 92, the mother of Academy Award-winning actor Olympia Dukakis, died Saturday in Montclair, N.J.

HAROLD MARTIN, 83, a war correspondent who received the Bronze Star, died Sunday in Atlanta of respiratory failure. He covered three wars for the Saturday Evening Post and later was a columnist for the Atlanta Constitution. He co-authored Soldier: The Memoirs of Matthew B. Ridgway with the Army general and wrote History of Georgia.

WILLIAM SEBASTIAN "SABBY" LEWIS, 79, a pianist who played with Billie Holiday and other jazz greats, died Saturday in Marstons Mills, Mass.

Local obituaries and the Suncoast Deaths list appear in regional sections.

BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO; Caption: Lars-Eric Lindblad

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OPINION

Quote

68 words
14 July 1994
The Toronto Star
Final
A24

 The Toronto Star

There is no doubt in my mind that my brother died from smoking. Patrick Reynolds of the Citizens for a Smokefree America, on the death of his brother R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company. R.J. Reynolds, 60, a heavy smoker who quit in 1986, died of emphysema as did his father and congestive heart failure.

*** Infomart-Online ***

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News and Features

REAR WINDOW

Edited By Andrew Main And Rowena Stretton
1,120 words
14 July 1994
Australian Financial Review
55

 of John Fairfax Group Pty Ltd

FOR HEAD-KICKER RICHO, IT'LL BE ALL RIGHT ON THE NIGHT

ANYONE who witnessed Graham Richardson in Canberra's Press Gallery in Parliament House yesterday would have concluded that the transition from political heavyweight to media pretender was almost complete.

The former health minister was seen looking very much the sartorial scribe- complete with the over-shoulder fashion briefcase - even chatting with some journalists who, in his former vocation, did not always see it his way.

Confirming that he is now well inside the journos' tent, the former right-wing head-kicker told our man he had even signed up with the relevant union, the left-leaning Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance.

Richo was checking out Channel Nine, for whom he will soon be doing a political magazine programme - adding yet another tentacle to his budding journalistic career which includes a column in Kerry Packer's stablemate publication, The Bulletin.

And, taking his cue from the former great helmsman, Bob Hawke, who covered himself in pre-publicity for his prime ministerial memoirs, Richo let it be known that his forthcoming book will be a good read, promising that it will hit the streets on October 31.

SPRAYED OUT

IT'S not so long ago that property developer Bob Mitchelson entertained lavishly at his historic Bellarine Peninsula property, Spray Farm, pictured above.

From the late 1970s Melbourne friends, such as chef Peter Russell Clark, man-about-town Peter Jansen, Bill Roycroft and fashion designer Mike Treloar, attended his champagne brunches, lunches and cross-country horse rides.

No more. Last month Spray Farm, an 1851 house on 59 hectares with extensive Port Phillip Bay frontage, was taken into possession by Ferrier Hodgson's Tony Hodgson as liquidator for Farrow Mortgage Services.

Hodgson also took the nearby vacant 57 hectares with planning approval for a golf course development.

The two properties, both a short drive from Port Arlington, are set to go separately under Sutherland Real Estate's hammer on August 6. Locals doubt that Spray Farm will achieve the $1 million it would have sold for in the 1980s.

CUSTOMER SERVICE ... TO A FAWLT

A NORTHSIDE Sydney branch of a major bank, which shall remain nabeless, has a novel approach to customer service.

Enterprising staff appear to have adopted the motto, "If you can't meet them, lower them", in respect to customer service.

A colleague there yesterday discovered a portable television set at the head of the queue.

The program being shown was Fawlty Towers.

At first mesmerised, he then realised the choice of program served two devious purposes.

The first is to take customers' minds off the fact they are standing in a queue waiting.

Secondly it makes the level of service at the bank branch look positively sensational compared with the "service" inflicted by Basil and Manuel on guests at Watery Fowls.

The colleague said he would rather stand for five minutes in an NAB branch watching Fawlty Towers than risk being served in less than that time -with no entertainment, what's more - in an ANZ branch.

TOBACCO HEIR GOES UP IN SMOKE

RICHARD J. Reynolds III, a grandson and namesake of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co, died on June 28 at his home in Pinehurst, North Carolina. He was 60.

His half-brother Patrick Reynolds, an anti-tobacco crusader in Los Angeles, said on Tuesday that the cause of death was emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking cigarettes.

Dr Roy Duke, who treated Richard J. III earlier this year in Florida, said: "I saw Mr Reynolds in January, and he was suffering very severe emphysema. The cause of death was end-stage emphysema as a result of smoking."

Patrick Reynolds said his brother gave up cigarettes in 1986 after years of heavy smoking. Their father, Richard J. Reynolds II, also died of emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58.

FRENCH LETTER DAY

LE Quatorze Juillet will not be allowed to go by without serious Gallic celebration and, not surprisingly, the Novotel in Sydney's Darling Harbour will be the main venue. The night begins with a "stand up and shout" hosted by Consul-General Michel Legras with about 380 starters including former PM Gough Whitlam and Patrick Vincent, the regional director of Laurent-Perrier champagne. The menu will feature frogs' legs, but of course, and Roclette cheese, even if it is a bit Swiss. Entertainment will include some singing gendarmes but not about yoghurt, we are assured.

SAFARI SO GOOD AT THE SUPER-EXOTIC TONGABEZI

TONGABEZI Safari Camp, a super-exotic destination, made headlines last year when Viscount Linley honeymooned there. But even before that, Tongabezi had its own Aussie following.

Boston Consulting Group's MD Maurie Koop is at the camp, as we speak. George Patterson chairman Alex Hamill is booking his second trip. BT director Tony Aveling and ANZ Capel Court principal John Dickson are other business types who've stayed at the upmarket cliff-face lodge beside Zimbabwe's Zambezi River.

One of the resort's founders, Willy Ruckzene, is visiting Sydney for a pretty solid reason: his engagement party at Whale Beach later this month. He is engaged to Julie McIntosh, who owns Hartley's Safaris with her brother, Craig McIntosh. Julie manages Hartley's. Craig works at Lend Lease Development Capital.

Craig McIntosh recalls how his call to Tongabezi fulfilled every accountant's dream. There he was in the "dark corridors" of Coopers & Lybrand when Willy whom he'd met at a travel show rang and suggested he manage the African camp for the 1993 season. "It was one of those 'if you want to, let me know quickly' things," he said.

He accepted. A career risk? No. He says his decision to take that time out of his career was considered positive by the Lend Lease Development Capital team, "a group of guys who look for people with outside and diverse interests".

MINE-EXPANDING

THE 80s may be over but the speculative end of the sharemarket is steadily coming back to life.

The Mitre Tavern in Melbourne, for instance, has started a food and wine club that meets monthly to allow brokers, punters and sharemarket players to share wisdom and tall tales.

The third meeting on Tuesday focused on the Victorian mining industry which, following a much-needed cut in red tape, is now alive again.

It used to be said that you needed 15 separate permits to open a mine in that State, which is why almost no-one did.

Topping this week's bill was the planned $3.5 million Peake Lands Kirwan supported-Momentum Mining NL issue.

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A NEWS

Tobacco family dissident blames government for death of brother

Reuters News Service
363 words
15 July 1994
Houston Chronicle
2 STAR
11

 

SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- Patrick Reynolds, the dissident scion of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco family, lashed out at the U.S. government for failing to regulate tobacco Thursday during a memorial service for his half-brother, who died of smoking-related illnesses.

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the company's founder, died June 28 at his home in North Carolina of what Patrick Reynolds said was emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. He was 60.

""The government has failed to properly regulate smoking,'' said Patrick Reynolds during a brief memorial service held at a Seventh-day Adventist church.

""This his brother's death has made my campaign real personal,'' he said.

An avid anti-smoker who has testified against the tobacco industry before Congress and who formed the Los Angeles-based activist group Citizens for a Smokefree America, Patrick Reynolds indicated he expects his brother's smoking-related death to be a weapon in his personal war on smoking.

""The story going around the world that R.J. Reynolds died from smoking will have a great impact,'' he said during the service.

Reynolds said the U.S. government and its ""system of special interests'' is to blame for the nation's failure to regulate tobacco as it does narcotics.

The trading of votes allows congressmen and senators from the tobacco-growing states to protect the tobacco industry in return for support for health care reform, he said.

""They're bribing each other in Washington,'' he said.

Reynolds wants the federal government to ban cigarette advertising and raise to 21 the legal age at which people can buy tobacco products.

Reynolds said his brother quit in 1986 after years of heavy smoking. At the end, R.J. Reynolds was extremely weak, virtually unable to speak and could walk fewer than 25 steps a day, Patrick Reynolds said.

He said his brother did not want people to know about his illness and would not let him visit in January.

Reynolds' father, also named R.J. Reynolds, died from emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58.

Mug: Patrick Reynolds

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NATIONAL
IN BRIEF

Pneumonia shots for elderly urged

From wire dispatches
773 words
15 July 1994
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
SOONER
a-6

 

Only about one in five elderly Americans have been inoculated against pneumococcal pneumonia, even though the shots protect against one of the most common killers of people over age 65.

Federal health officials announced a new campaign yesterday to encourage older Americans to get immunization injections against the disease, which kills 40,000 elderly Americans a year.

Federal officials said the pneumonia injections are now paid for by Medicare and by many health insurance policies.

Summer is the preferred time to get the shots, said Dr. Richard Hodes, director of the National Institute on Aging. Officials said patients may find it convenient to get the pneumonia injections at the same time they receive their annual flu shot.

------

IN BRIEF

From wire dispatches

Navy: Oust gay sailor

WASHINGTON

A Navy board recommended yesterday that Lt. Tracy Thorne, who declared his homosexuality on television, be honorably discharged. His attorneys said they will challenge the Clinton administration's "don't ask, don't tell" policy in federal court. The three-member Navy Board of Inquiry announced its unanimous decision on the fourth day of a hearing. Capt. Douglas W. Cook, the board's president, said Thorne "failed, in fact made no effort" to dispute a presumption that he engaged in homosexual conduct, which is grounds for dismissal.

------

IN BRIEF

From wire dispatches

USAF general bounced

WASHINGTON

A U.S. Air Force general has been relieved as commander of allied forces protecting Kurds in northern Iraq after the accidental downing of two American helicopters by U.S. jets, the Pentagon said yesterday. Defense Department spokeswoman Kathleen deLaski declined to say whether the replacement of Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Pilkington on June 26 was directly connected with the April 14 tragedy, in which 26 people were killed.

------

IN BRIEF

From wire dispatches

Stressed-out newt dies

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

Space shuttle Columbia's most prolific newt -- she had laid about 40 eggs in less than a week in orbit -- was found dead yesterday, an apparent victim of stress. Scientists lost not only the salamander but all her eggs and 48 other newt eggs that were in the same laboratory tray and were contaminated by the dead animal. Columbia's two other newts had laid about a dozen eggs in space as of yesterday, six days into the 14-day mission devoted to research into how organisms reproduce, develop and adapt in space.

------

IN BRIEF

From wire dispatches

4 lying on tracks killed

MANASSAS, Va.

Four young men killed by a freight train as they lay on the tracks may have been playing "chicken," authorities said. Police found drug paraphernalia and beer cans near where the men were run over by a 144-car Norfolk Southern train before dawn Wednesday. A parked car smelled strongly of alcohol.

------

IN BRIEF

From wire dispatches

Scion blasts tobacco

SANTA MONICA, Calif.

Patrick Reynolds, the dissident scion of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco family, lashed out at the U.S. government yesterday for failing to regulate tobacco. He made his comments during a memorial service for his half-brother, who died of smoking-related illnesses. R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the company's founder, died June 28 at his home in North Carolina of what Patrick Reynolds said was emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. He was 60. "This his brother's death has made my campaign real personal," said Patrick Reynolds, who wants the government to ban cigarette advertising and raise to 21 the legal age at which people can buy tobacco products.

------

IN BRIEF

From wire dispatches

Motorist-death arrest

MIAMI

A 16-year-old boy with an extensive criminal record was arrested yesterday in the robbery and killing of a man who police say had stopped to help an accident victim. Charles Bells, 44, was on a shopping errand for his mother on Tuesday night when he hit a girl who darted into the path of his car. When he got out of his car to check on the slightly injured girl, he was beaten, shot and robbed by a mob. Metro-Dade police Detective Gary Smith would not say if the boy in custody is the suspected gunman.

------

IN BRIEF

From wire dispatches

Noriega seeks new trial

MIAMI

Lawyers for Panamanian Gen. Manuel Noriega sought to win him a new trial on drug racketeering charges yesterday, arguing that one juror was pressured into convicting him. The lawyers told U.S. District Judge William Hoeveler that two jurors pressured an undecided woman to convict Noriega by telling her that the whole nation was waiting for the verdict.

LIB3

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Metro; PART-B; Metro Desk

Memorial Message Tobacco Scion R.J. Reynolds III, an Emphysema Victim, Is Eulogized by His Brother, an Anti-Smoking Activist

BOB POOL
TIMES STAFF WRITER
590 words
15 July 1994
Los Angeles Times
Home
3

 The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1994  

It was an unusual moment: Anti-cigarette advocates gathered to eulogize an heir to the giant R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.

*

That was the scene Thursday in Santa Monica as no-smoking crusader Patrick Reynolds conducted a memorial service for his half-brother, R.J. Reynolds III.

R.J. Reynolds, a 60-year-old grandson and namesake of the cigarette company founder, died June 28 of smoking-related emphysema.

"We agreed to disagree about tobacco issues," said Patrick Reynolds, 45, of Beverly Hills. "He didn't put me down for what I was doing, and I didn't put him down for smoking."

Patrick Reynolds shocked his family by divesting himself of tobacco stock, quitting smoking and then testifying eight years ago on Capitol Hill in favor of a ban on cigarette advertising. Since then he has spent more than half of his $2.5-million inheritance on the anti-smoking cause.

Nonetheless, Reynolds said he annually spent Christmas and a week each summer in North Carolina with R.J. Reynolds. "I didn't nag my brother about his smoking," he said. "Family members shouldn't do that."

R.J. Reynolds, who was 60 when he died at his estate in Pinehurst, N.C., will be remembered as a poet, horse breeder and philanthropist, Patrick Reynolds told about two dozen who attended the service.

But he admitted that R.J. Reynolds was also "an intensely shy, quiet man who avoided the limelight" and "wouldn't have wanted people to know he was sick from smoking."

The R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. has had no comment on the death, except to note that no Reynolds family member has been connected with the company for several decades.

Private services were held July 5 in North Carolina. But there was no announcement of the death until this week, when Patrick Reynolds disclosed that it had been caused by a smoking-related illness.

R.J. Reynolds had been a heavy smoker of R.J. Reynolds Co. Winston cigarettes until about 1988, Patrick Reynolds said. Thursday's service was staged, he said, because "I feel closer to some of the people here in Los Angeles than to the ones back in North Carolina."

"My family doesn't like it very much, but I feel it's the thing to do," he added. "The story of R.J. Reynolds dying of smoking will have real impact. I believe he's up in heaven now, urging me on and applauding me."

Other opponents of smoking agreed that it might seem odd for them to memorialize an heir to a tobacco company that they claim has contributed to the deaths of thousands of smokers.

"But this man was a victim, too," said Robert Cherno, a member of an anti-cigarette group called Doctors Ought to Care.

Patrick Reynolds, who displayed family snapshots of his half-brother, said the death will make him step up his work with his group, Citizens for a Smokefree America.

"The issue is getting real personal now," he said.

PHOTO: R.J. Reynolds III, who was remembered at a service organized by his half-brother. PHOTO: COLOR, TOBACCO'S TOLL: Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking advocate, leads a Santa Monica memorial service for his half-brother R.J. Reynolds III, a cigarette firm heir who died recently of emphysema. / PAUL MORSE / For The Times

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Brother lashes government during memorial for R.J. Reynolds.

362 words
15 July 1994
Reuters News

c 1994 Reuters Limited

SANTA MONICA, Calif, July 14 Reuter - Patrick Reynolds, the dissident scion of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco family, lashed out at the U.S. government for failing to regulate tobacco Thursday during a memorial service for his half-brother, who died of smoking-related illnesses.

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the company's founder, died June 28 at his home in North Carolina of what Patrick Reynolds said was emphysema and congestive heart failure caused by smoking. He was 60.

"The government has failed to properly regulate smoking," said Patrick Reynolds during a brief memorial service held at a Seventh-day Adventist church.

"This his brother's death has made my campaign real personal," he said.

An avid anti-smoker who has testified against the tobacco industry before Congress and who formed the Los Angeles-based activist group Citizens for a Smokefree America, Patrick Reynolds indicated he expects his brother's smoking-related death to be a weapon in his personal war on smoking.

"The story going around the world that R.J. Reynolds died from smoking will have a great impact," he said during the service.

Reynolds said the U.S. government and its "system of special interests" is to blame for the nation's failure to regulate tobacco as it does narcotics.

The trading of votes allows congressmen and senators from the tobacco-growing states to protect the tobacco industry in return for support for health care reform, he said.

"They're bribing each other in Washington," he said.

Reynolds wants the federal government to ban cigarette advertising and raise to 21 the legal age at which people can buy tobacco products.

Reynolds said his brother quit in 1986 after years of heavy smoking. At the end, R.J. Reynolds was extremely weak, virtually unable to speak and could walk fewer than 25 steps a day, Patrick Reynolds said.

He said his brother did not want people to know about his illness and would not let him visit in January.

Reynolds' father, also named R.J. Reynolds, died from emphysema in 1964 at the age of 58.

c Reuters Limited 1994

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1, News
THE WEEK IN REVIEW: MONDAY, JULY 11, 1994 - FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1994

THE WEEK IN REVIEW: Monday, July 11, 1994 - Friday, July 15, 1994

Rob Wilson
1,817 words
16 July 1994
The Financial Post
Weekly
2

 The Financial Post

MONDAY, JULY 11, 1994

Bombardier Inc. dismissed stories of a $200-million Challenger ''spy plane'' deal with China. Company spokeswoman Catherine Chase said: ''We haven't submitted any proposal to sell Challengers fitted with electronic surveillance gear to China. She dismissed CTV news reports of a document showing a spy plane deal was being considered, with Israeli spying equipment to be installed in the aircraft. The document, said Chase, came from a meeting with marketing staff who were trying to ''clarify government regulations and policy on exports to China.''

Leonid Kuchma was declared the winner in Ukraine's presidential election in an upset victory over incumbent Leonid Kravchuk. Kuchma, a former missile factory director, was seen as a gain for Moscow, as he pledged closer relations with Russia, saying Ukraine would act as a bridge between Russia and the West. Kuchma took 52% of the vote, with Kravchuk getting 45%.

Kim Jong-il, son of North Korean president Kim Il-sung, who died Saturday at age 82, received ambassadors paying respects to the only leader the Stalinist state has ever had. The younger Kim - assumed to be taking over the presidency from his father - was shown on South Korean television weeping before a crystal sarcophagus as the late president lay in state in Pyongyang.

TUESDAY, JULY 12, 1994

Hussein Abdirahman, a former Somali government minister fighting to stay in Canada, told his deportation hearing in Ottawa he had no real power under dictator Mohamed Siad Barre. ''I was like someone in a jail because I was not in a position to initiate anything of substance,'' said Abdirahman, a former Somali attorney general, justice minister and defence minister. Abdirahman, 52, entered Canada last year under sponsorship by his wife and now lives in Ottawa.

Hundreds of weary Manitoba Indians ended a long protest march to Winnipeg after Ottawa promised $11 million to help clean up the polluted drinking water in their northern community. ''I think they have very much to be proud of,'' said Ralph Caribou, chief of the Mathias Colomb band, as he emerged from a three-hour meeting with Indian Affairs Minister Ron Irwin. Hundreds of people fled Pukatawagan last week for The Pas, about 200 kilometres south, after a nine-year-old boy was hospitalized with hepatitis.

R.J. Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, died of what his brother said was smoking-related emphysema and congestive heart failure at the age of 60. Patrick Reynolds said his brother, who quit the habit in 1986 after years of heavy smoking, died June 28. ''I did not announce my brother's death before this because I did not want any publicity surrounding the private family services,'' he said, adding he also delayed the announcement because family members opposed his saying that smoking was the cause of death.

Germany shook off self-imposed military fetters adopted after the Second World War when the supreme court ruled that Bonn could join international armed missions. The judges quelled a dispute over a united Germany's new world role by saying the 1949 constitution did not stop its troops from joining UN peacekeeping or combat missions. At the same time, the court said Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government had infringed on the rights of parliament by not consulting it before sending troops to monitor UN sanctions and a no-fly zone in the former Yugoslavia.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 1994

Major airports, including the country's busiest, Pearson International in Toronto, will be turned over to local authorities to operate on a commercial basis, Transport Minister Doug Young said. Young said the goal is to turn the federal government from owner and operator of most of the country's airports to landlord and regulator. He estimated the policy, which will be developed over five years, will eventually save Ottawa about $100 million annually in operating and capital costs.

B.C. Premier Mike Harcourt said he will sign an agreement to reduce interprovincial trade barriers even though the deal does not address all his province's concerns. Harcourt had earlier suggested he might refuse to sign the pact in Ottawa this Monday, but he said cabinet decided to approve the deal.

U.S. President Bill Clinton got an aerial view of flood-ravaged Georgia, where rising waters have killed 30 people and forced thousands to flee their homes. Clinton announced a US$66-million aid package for the flood-damaged southeastern states of Georgia, Florida and Alabama.

Ninety-two human-rights observers, including three Canadians, left Haiti in compliance with the military-backed government's expulsion order. The monitors, from the Organization of American States and the UN, left Port-au-Prince for Guadeloupe on a scheduled Air France flight.

THURSDAY, JULY 14, 1994

A missing lawyer accused of bilking clients of more than $1 million appeared in Australian court after Toronto police tracked his travels and tipped police in Sydney. But it could be up to a year before John Jaffey is extradited to Canada if he resorts to Australian courts to delay his return. A spokesman for the Australian police said Jaffey faces several charges, including using a false passport and unlawfully having goods valued at $1.6 million.

Ontario fired the board of Canada's largest public housing agency after an audit unearthed financial bungling and a serious risk of fraud and bribery. Housing Minister Evelyn Gigantes said she was taking the ''drastic'' step of replacing the Metropolitan Toronto Housing Authority's 12-member volunteer board with a team of accountants, who were asked to overhaul the agency by late September.

Canada won't solve its crime problem by deporting all immigrants who break the law, especially if they've been in the country since childhood, Jamaican Prime Minister Percival Patterson told a news conference in Ottawa. He suggested that someone like Clinton Gayle, a Jamaican accused of killing a Toronto police officer last month, is not his country's problem. Gayle, 25, came to Canada when he was eight, but never became a Canadian citizen. He was ordered deported in 1991 but the order was never carried out.

German troops rolled through Paris for the first time since the Second World War, taking part in France's Bastille Day parade. The occasion was hailed by President Francois Mitterrand as the foundations of a future European defence. ''France today honors . . . the European army corps, whose presence is testimony to the shared wish of our people to build the future together,'' he said in his traditional message to the armed forces.

Hundreds of thousands of Rwandans streamed across the border into Zaire as the Hutu government army retreated before a rebel offensive. A sea of people struggled across the border into the town of Goma, some collapsing exhausted as soon as they reached Zaire, others plodding on to hurriedly organized UN refugee camps. The head of the UN Rwanda Emergency Office said he expected 800,000 people to flee across the border. France, which has troops in Rwanda, called for an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council.

FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1994

Michael Blair, who holds about 7% of Consolidated Enfield Corp.'s preferred shares, said he and Henry Knowles will step aside as candidates for election to the the company's board. Blair said he will support the election to the board of two independent directors - George Montegue and Ted McDowell - to represent holders of class E, series 1 preferred shares. Montegue and McDowell will be named as candidates in an information circular being mailed by the company, and will be supported by management, Blair said.

John Labatt Ltd. was put on credit watch by Canadian Bond Rating Service because of debt linked to a proposed $700-million investment in a Mexican beer company. The agreement between Labatt and Fomento Economico Mexicano SA, announced July 6, ''has both positive and negative credit implications,'' CBRS said. The credit watch ''with developing implications'' will last until the deal is concluded, probably by the end of September.

Chemical weapons tests over Winnipeg, Minneapolis and St. Louis posed ''negligible'' health risks, according to the the U.S. army branch that conducted the operations. Tests of zinc cadmium sulphide in 1953 ''should not have posed any adverse health effects,'' said the U.S. army's biological warfare headquarters at Fort Detrick, Md. Cadmium has been linked to cancer, lung and kidney disorders. Manitoba Health Minister Jim McCrae was not reassured by the report. He said he was concerned that it was prepared by the same agency that did the testing. The U.S. army told the public it was testing smokescreens for defence against any incoming Soviet missiles. In fact, the Pentagon sprayed clouds of zinc cadmium sulphide to see how well chemical weapons would disperse over cities under different wind conditions.

A poll of Quebec voters showed the Parti Quebecois still leading in popularity, with 51.2% of decided voters, compared to 41.5% for the governing Liberals. The Leger & Leger poll of 1,003 Quebecers showed the gap widening between the PQ and the Liberals; in the same poll last month, the gap was about five percentage points. However, the poll, with a three-point margin of error, also showed support for a separate Quebec continued to slide, with 46.5% in favor and 53.5% against. Last month about 48% favored separation and 52% were against it.

An audit has borne out some of the conflict-of-interest allegations raised by Valery Fabrikant, the former professor who killed four of his Concordia University colleagues in 1992. Two professors are being put on unpaid leave and will not return, the university said. A third, who is now on sabbatical, won't go back to work either. The report condemned the lack of financial controls at the engineering and computer science faculty and said research grants ''were diverted to uses other than those permitted under the rules.''

UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali recommended the U.S. and its allies provide a 15,000ong force in Haiti after the military leaves office. The UN, he said, could not field such a large force under its umbrella but would move in with several hundred peacekeepers after a secure environment was established.

Protestant extremists waging a violent campaign to keep Northern Ireland British offered an olive branch to their IRA enemies, pledging to lay down their arms if their foes did the same. But Sinn Fein, the Irish Republican Army's political wing, condemned the offer as a sham. In a statement issued in Belfast amid a spiral of violent attacks, the two main pro-British militant groups vowed to match any ceasefire declared by the IRA. *** Infomart-Online ***

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LOCAL Denver, Colorado

DENVER Transport plan under fire

Rocky Mountain News staff
323 words
3 August 1994
Rocky Mountain News
FINAL
6a

 

A coalition of environmentalists is protesting the Denver Regional Council of Government's transportation plan because it violates air pollution standards for particulates. Environmentalists from the Citizens for Balanced Transportation, the Colorado Environmental Coalition and the Colorado Public Interest Research Group want transportation planners to fund more car-pooling lanes and transit alternatives to Denver International Airport. The council plans a hearing Aug. 17 to discuss a list of proposed metro-area transportation projects. The work can't go forward with any federal funds until transportation experts can prove they won't cause additional air pollution.

------

Rocky Mountain News staff

METRO NEWS BRIEFING

Concert moved to arena

National Youth Day's free concert Thursday is being moved to McNichols Sports Arena, conference organizers said Tuesday. The concert had been scheduled from noon to 9 p.m. at Barnum Park. But Denver police were concerned about security, organizers said. In another development, Mother Teresa of Calcutta will appear via video. She said last month she wouldn't be able to attend National Youth Day because of her schedule.

------

Rocky Mountain News staff

METRO NEWS BRIEFING

Greens submit petitions

The Green Party of Colorado has submitted petitions seeking to place candidates on the November ballot in the races for governor and lieutenant governor. Philip Hufford, 46, of Denver is campaigning for governor and Krista Paradise, 33, of Carbondale is running for lieutenant governor. The Green Party is a global movement that stands for social justice, environmental protection, non-violence and grassroots democracy, Hufford said.

------

Rocky Mountain News staff

METRO NEWS BRIEFING

Petition ceremony Thursday

Supporters of a ballot issue asking Coloradans to raise tobacco taxes by 50CENTS a pack will turn in their petitions on Thursday. Among those scheduled to take part in the ceremonies is Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco founder R.J. Reynolds. The ceremonies will Association offices.

METRO NEWS BRIEFING

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NEWS

Tobacco killed my family

Patrick Reynolds
1,067 words
4 August 1994
USA Today
FINAL
09A

 

When my older brother, R.J. Reynolds III, died recently from emphysema caused by his smoking addiction, the story was trumpeted by newspapers and broadcast media around the world.

But when our father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., died from precisely the same cause in 1964, his cigarette addiction went virtually unnoticed.

There's some irony in the fact that two R.J. Reynoldses, as well as several other family members, have died from cigarette smoking.

There's further irony in the fact that a Food and Drug Administration panel concluded this week what research has being showing all along - that the nicotine contained in cigarettes is an addictive drug.

It's getting personal again.

Who exactly is to blame?

It's easy to point to the tobacco companies, whose billions spent annually on manipulative and deceptive advertisements have helped influence millions of teen-agers and children to smoke.

It's an obvious call to point to the tobacco companies' CEOs, who testified under oath that they did not believe nicotine to be addictive and that they would never tamper with nicotine levels.

And, it's easy to point to the industry's outrageous abuses of freedom of speech, such as its full-page ads proclaiming that smoking is a matter of choice. What choice? According to Dr. C. Everett Koop's report, nicotine is as addictive as heroin.

There looms an even greater culprit than the tobacco companies.

Our government's system of allowing the special interests to influence the votes of our elected officials with campaign contributions is perhaps the greatest evil in our government today.

New studies show that the officials who receive big tobacco's contributions do tend to vote against legislation to regulate cigarettes. And tobacco has been contributing.

In recent years, the cigarette industry has been donating millions to the campaign funds of politicians at the federal and state levels.

In the last presidential election, the tobacco interests gave unprecedented amounts to the Bush and Clinton campaigns. The ranks of the tobacco lobby now include a number of top Reagan and Bush administration officials, all of whom have extraordinary access to those presently in power.

Corporations never spend large amounts of money without expecting something in return.

What does the tobacco industry hope to gain from spending millions on political contributions?

First, it has managed to keep cigarette advertising legal, when it should have been banned long ago, as France, Canada and other nations have done. The industry can no longer plausibly use the freedom of speech argument to justify its ads' continued association of smoking with positive images of health, sports, success and being "a real person."

Simply put, tobacco ads are outrageous lies. The attractive models on cigarette billboards are role models that our children see daily and look up to. In fact, these ads are the tobacco industry's greatest means of holding on to a gradually waning public acceptance of smoking.

Cigarette ads, which have in recent years been proliferating across the Third World, China and Eastern Europe, are an enormous abuse of freedom of speech. They should be banned. But the power of the tobacco lobby keeps them legal in the U.S. It's a national disgrace.

Another result of the lobbying and campaign contributions is that the U.S. has the lowest tax on cigarettes of any industrialized nation in the world - proof that the special interests have far too much influence over policy.

Our average state and federal tax on cigarettes is 52 cents per pack - vs. $3.26 in Canada, $4.07 in Denmark, $3.24 in England and about $2 per pack in many other countries.

With a recent study informing us that the direct medical costs of smoking are over $2 per pack, a $2 tax on cigarettes is the minimum which should now be considered. But the proposed Senate and House health-care bills that will set the stage next week for the debate on health-care reform ask for a mere 45-cent tax increase - despite the Senate Finance Committee's request for a $1 increase.

The tobacco lobby's influence is again obvious with its success in getting the U.S. trade office to pressure the governments of Japan, South Korea and Taiwan to open their markets to U.S. cigarettes. Under threat of trade sanctions by us, all lowered their import duties on U.S. brands.

Since 1968, smoking around the world has actually increased by 73%. With today's aggressive marketing and advertising in Far Eastern and Third World nations, smoking rates in Asia and the Middle East are skyrocketing.

Some people might suggest that this isn't much different from what other big industries do to influence policy. There is a big difference.

While the cigarette companies plaintively ask, "Why single out tobacco?" the answer is simple: Cigarettes are the only products which, when used as intended, cause widespread addiction, disease and death.

Other products, like alcohol, are not necessarily harmful when used as intended. Cigarettes are, and that's why tobacco should be singled out and regulated much more tightly.

The core issue here is getting rid of the tobacco lobby and the government's tolerance of the special interests, which makes it all possible.

But it's unlikely that incumbents in Congress will enact any true campaign finance reform soon, since that would mean giving up the enormous advantages they've come to enjoy over challengers. And so the status quo continues.

Only the judicial branch might one day challenge this corruption on the part of the legislative branch.

I shake my head sadly when I think of how efficiently and easily the tobacco industry buys off our elected officials.

Let's find a way to end the system of PACs and lobbying that has diluted or thwarted our nearly every effort at tobacco control, and is thwarting plenty of other legislation that is also in the public's best interest.

If we don't, we will continue to decline as a nation. If we do, there is hope. And one day, we might really have a smoke-free society.

Patrick Reynolds is founder of Citizens for a Smokefree America in Los Angeles.; Patrick Reynolds is the grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company.

GRAPHIC,b/w,Marcia Staimer,USA TODAYIllustration

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CITY/STATE

Cigarette-tax backers win ballot spot/ Onslaught expected from tobacco firms

Angela Dire; Gazette Telegraph
389 words
5 August 1994
Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph
B5

 

DENVER - Supporters of a cigarette tax increase turned in their petitions to the Secretary of State's Office on Thursday, claiming a small triumph over the tobacco industry in a fight to put the issue before voters.

The Fair Share for Health Committee turned in 102,209 signatures - nearly 53,000 more than they need for their proposal to qualify for the November election ballot.

The measure would raise the tax on a pack of cigarettes by 50 cents and spend the money on health care for working people without insurance as well as educational programs to discourage children from smoking. State and local taxes currently add up to about 44 cents a pack.

"This issue is enormously popular and it represents the will of the people of Colorado," said Marianne Neifert, president of the campaign.

Although the surplus of signatures makes a ballot spot almost certain, supporters of the measure are bracing for a blitzkrieg from the tobacco industry. Large tobacco companies already have joined to fight the tax. Since the beginning of the year, they've raised more than $300,000 - nearly double the Fair Share Committee's contributions.

"We expect to be outspent by as much as 20-to-1 by a veritable army of mercenary tobacco lobbyists, high-powered lawyers and clever PR people," Neifert said.

So on Thursday, committee members trotted out the grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. An outspoken opponent of the tobacco industry, Patrick Reynolds has crisscrossed the nation supporting no-smoking ordinances and tax hikes on cigarettes. He is founder of the Los Angeles-based group Citizens for a Smokefree America.

"My only memories of my father were him lying down on his back, dying of emphysema caused by smoking," he said. ". . . I now lose my oldest brother to emphysema caused by smoking. This is getting a little personal."

While the R.J. Reynolds company already has put $80,968 into the fight against Colorado's proposed tobacco tax, Patrick Reynolds could only afford to write a check for $100 to the Fair Share Committee on Thursday.

"Financially, I'm not a wealthy man," he said, "but I do what I can to make a difference."

Label: STATE

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LOCAL Denver, Colorado

Group files petitions for cigarette tax hike

John Sanko; Rocky Mountain News Capitol Bureau
547 words
5 August 1994
Rocky Mountain News
FINAL
14a

 

With the grandson of tobacco baron R.J. Reynolds cheering them on, members of a Colorado group that wants to raise taxes on cigarettes by 50CENTS a pack filed petitions containing 102,209 signatures with the secretary of state Thursday.

Patrick Reynolds, an advocate of a tobacco-free America, joined scores of others at American Lung Association offices to take the petitions to Natalie Meyer's offices.

If the petitions have the required 49,274 signatures of registered electors, the tax measure - which in one form or other has been struggling to get on the ballot since 1988 - will be placed before voters in November.

Reynolds, who sold off all his tobacco stock in 1979, predicts that the tobacco industry will deluge Coloradans with a $5 million barrage of ads to oppose the tax, which would raise an estimated $130 million a year.

"The tobacco industry is going to do everything in its power to kill it," Reynolds said. "They're planning to spend as much as $5 million on paid advertising against this tax. It's important not to be deceived by the cunning barrage of tobacco-industry advertising."

Representatives of the Fair Share for Health Committee, a coalition that supports the tax, said they expect that the tobacco industry will challenge their signatures over the next 30 days but said they are confident the tax measure will be on the ballot.

Tobacco-industry spokesman Frank "Pancho" Hays said he is not surprised by the large number of signatures the tax advocates gathered.

"Look at where the money came from and who is going to get it," Hays said. "That's what it's all about, despite all statements to the contrary. Those pushing this are the bureaucrats and health organizations that stand to gain personally.

"The biggest contributors to this campaign are primarily hospitals, all of whom would get a huge windfall to the profits they're already making. They're seeking to add tens of millions of dollars a year to the bottom line.

"They're all feeding at the trough. I think they're salivating to get at that trough."

Dr. Marianne Neifert, a pediatrician who heads the campaign, said most of the money raised through the new tax would go for health care for working people without insurance and for education to prevent tobacco use.

She said state and federal cigarette taxes in Colorado currently are 44CENTS per pack, putting it among the 15 or so states with the lowest taxes.

Reynolds said that in California, the tobacco industry outspent proponents of a tax measure there by $23 million to $1.3 million.

"They ran the most deceptive ads I've ever seen on TV," Reynolds said. "You saw an ad with a picture of golf clubs being thrown in the back of a Cadillac and a voiceover that ran: `Don't vote for the tobacco tax. Doctors are going to get rich from the tobacco tax if you vote for it.'

"Doctors have never gotten rich from treating poor people. That tax money was going to go to indigent medical care for people who didn't have the money to pay for medical care."

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Hollywood goes up in smoke. movie stars who smoke cigarettes

Nancy Matsumoto
1,421 words
12 September 1994
People Weekly
114
Vol. 42, No. 11, ISSN: 0093-7673

 Time Inc.

THIRTEEN YEARS AGO, WHEN REality Bites star Winona Ryder was not quite a decade old, 15-year-old beauty Brooke Shields popped up in a series of antismoking advertisements and posters. "Smoking spoils your looks," she warned in one ad, a cigarette in each of her ears. Winona doesn't seem to have let Shields's message sink in quite deep enough. Ryder, 22, one of the signal actresses of her generation, smokes like the tailpipe of James Dean's old Harley in Reality Bites, that comedy-drama documenting twentysomething love and angst. She lights up in front of the television, in the car, in the office, in the middle of a kiss with costar Ethan Hawke who also smokes, onscreen and off; Reality screenwriter Helen Childress says Ryder is a celluloid smoker only.

But here's the part that really troubles some people: Ryder never looks dumb in the movie. With the help of her cigarette, never is she less than pensively alluring. Hawke, to be honest, looks pretty cool too. So does Jason Priestley, chain-smoking when he's away from those Beverly Hills, 90210 cameras. Luke Perry can take it or leave it. And how about Christian Slater and Johnny Depp, or any of the other young, tobacco-stained Turks who -- to the consternation of such antismoking advocates as Patrick Reynolds, 45, grandson of tobacco-industry giant R.J. Reynolds -- are idolized and imitated by potentially millions of teenagers? Couldn't Winona have considered not making smoking so seductive in Reality Bites, he wonders. "She's a role model for teenage girls, through and through, and she's smoking away."

Call them Hollywood's Pack Brats, basking in each other's secondhand smoke even as the national debate over cigarettes rages. Linked with cancer and heart disease, death, smelliness and even what with the resulting rise in health-care costs an increase in taxes, smoking is banned -- or at least strictly regulated -- in theaters, offices and restaurants including those in L.A.. You can't smoke in the White House Bill is allergic, let alone in a number of prisons. Between 1965 the year after Surgeon General Luther L. Terry issued his landmark warning and 1991, the percentage of American adults who smoke plummeted by more than half, to 25 percent.

No matter; in Hollywood movies the habit is still big. According to a 1993 study conducted by cardiologists at the University of California, San Francisco, the number of young smokers on the movie screen more than doubled in the past 30 years, while adult, educated smokers have been consistently overrepresented -- there are proportionately three times as many of them on the screen as in the national audience. Even now, at theaters near you, Susan Sarandon is bonding with a rough-and-tumble 11-year-old by sharing a cigarette in The Client. Jeff Bridges, as a police bomb expert in Blown Away, also blows out smoke. And Mel Gibson plans to star in the movie version of Thank You for Smoking, Christopher Buckley's satirical novel whose hero is a handsome tobacco lobbyist. "Mel likes the story because it takes on political correctness," says Keith Davis, head of development for Gibson's production company. "This lobbyist is a smart, charming, basically good guy who just happens to smoke."

For adults, who have pretty much decided whether they're going to be smokers or not, Gibson's character might be just that. But teenagers are another story. For them, charming -- or appealingly angst-ridden -- smokers can serve as missionaries for tobacco. Three million of the nation's 46 million smokers are teenagers, consuming nearly a billion packs of cigarettes a year; each day an estimated 3,000 teens take their first puff. Indeed, recent government statistics indicate that smoking among twentysomethings has increased. Nudging them toward the habit are more than $4 billion a year in promotion and adverising. Government statistics released last month show that the three most heavily promoted brands, Newport, Camel and Marlboro, capture a staggering 86 percent of the teenage market.

That's without benefit of TV commercials, banned in 1971, or -- so all tobacco representatives contacted for this article insist -- cigarette companies paying to have their product "placed" in movies, a practice they agreed to end in 1990. Although Buckley, for one, suspects that such fees continue to be paid to moviemakers coping with huge costs. "Any movie in which you can see a readily identifiable pack of cigarettes, you can smell more than smoke," he says. "You can smell a big, hairy rat."

But many in Hollywood believe that, even with ads curtailed, images of stars smoking, whether onscreen or in their private lives, are sufficiently dangerous allurement. Which is why some show-business folks weave antismoking messages into movies and TV shows. Only the occasional misfit lights up on Fox's Beverly Hills, 90210 or Melrose Place. On the new ABC teen-angst drama My So-Called Life, 15-year-old Claire Danes doesn't smoke, but the sultry boy she has a crush on does. So does her best friend's loudmouth mother. In one episode of James L. Brooks's cartoon series The Simpsons, greedy tobacco executives fling cigarette packs at kids. "I don't think anyone on the show smokes who's not dying from it," says producer Brooks. "Marge Simpson's sisters are clearly not long for this world."

Or consider: In the current movie Corrina, Corrina, set in 1959, child actress Tina Majorino hides dad Ray Liotta's cigarettes. In Angels in the Outfield, associate producer-screenwriter Holly Goldberg Sloan deliberately had the team's good guys chew gum, while one loser character smokes. "I try to make smoking a trait of the dark characters," says Sloan, the mother of two preteens. "That way kids can make the correlation linking an unattractive habit with an unattractive person."

But what about the onscreen smokers who are appealing? Joe Cherner, head of the nonprofit SmokeFree Educational Services of Manhattan, targets them in ads he places in such trade publications as Variety. "Your movies make smoking seem sexy, cool and grown up," he wrote to Christian Slater, 25, who inhaled throughout last year's True Romance. "Thus, unwittingly, you are the tobacco companies' best tool."

And yet Cherner who says no star has responded directly to the ads is himself a sort of target. After all, as anyone who has been through adolescence can recall, smoking is cool, in part, precisely because a bunch of adults keep telling you it's not. "Whenever something that's unhealthy is demonized, it becomes irresistible," says Richard Klein, author of Cigarettes Are Sublime, a meditation on the culture of tobacco.

Reynolds suspects the psychology is more complicated. "My gut feeling about Hollywood smokers is that many are ashamed of the fact that they're addicted," he says. In fact, not a single one of the smoking celebrities contacted by PEOPLE cared to discuss the topic. Are they truly enjoying their cigarettes? Mel Gibson suggests not. "He'd love to quit," says production associate Keith Davis, "but he can't. Like almost everybody, he has tried -- but it's a tough addiction."

CAPTION: Activist Joe Cherner took out this ad in Variety to chastise 90210's Perry and Priestley.

CAPTION: Before hitting the runway, Naomi Campbell puffed away at a fashion show in July.

CAPTION: Johnny Depp greeting a fan also lights up in his next film, Ed Wood.

CAPTION: Christian Slater and Jaye Davidson played the smoking game at a fall fashion show.

CAPTION: Drew Barrymore used cigarettes for sex appeal as she vamped in L.A. last year.

CAPTION: "What would it be without cigarettes?" asks screenwriter Richard Friedenberg of 1942's Bette Davis-Paul Henreid classic Now, Voyager.

CAPTION: "We have to appeal to stars like Ryder," says antismoking crusader Patrick Reynolds of the actress in Reality Bites with Ethan Hawke.

CAPTION: Unlike her beau Johnny Depp, model Kate Moss smokes only between jobs.

CAPTION: For Sarah Jessica Parker, dining out means a table in the smoking section.

CAPTION: "The hunky male hero is rarely allowed to smoke," says Tobacco Institute spokesman Tom Lauria. That doesn't include hunky antiheroes like convict Kevin Costner with T.J. Lowther in A Perfect World.

CAPTION: On ABC's sensitive high school drama My So-Called Life featuring A.J. Langer and Wilson Cruz, some antismoking messages are silent.

illustration photograph

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NEWS

R.J. Reynolds Heir Carries Banner Against Smoking

Penny Owen
Staff Writer
612 words
16 September 1994
The Daily Oklahoman
10

 

"You're going to do what?!"

That was the initial response Patrick Reynolds got from his tobacco heir family when he told them he planned to publicly oppose smoking - and make a living at it.

Since then, the grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds has told the world of the need to tax cigarettes, keep them out of teen-agers' fingers and regulate them like any other addictive substance under the Food and Drug Administration.

On Thursday, Reynolds joined U.S. Rep. Mike Synar and anti-smoking advocate John F. Banzhaf III at the 1994 Oklahoma Tobacco Use Prevention Conference in Oklahoma City.

It was a call for Oklahomans to follow California's lead and ban smoking in all restaurants and to make Oklahoma the 13th state allowed to use smoking as an issue in child custody cases.

Oklahomans need to demand their congressmen support House Resolution 3434, the Smokefree Environment Bill that would ban smoking in most public buildings except those which have areas with separate ventilation systems, Reynolds said.

"These are not the fanatical measures the tobacco companies would have you think," Reynolds said. "These are reasonable laws."

The anti-smoking coalition based its reasoning on statistics that put Oklahoma near the bottom of the war against cigarettes.

Oklahoma is ranked first in the number of women age 35-64 who smoke - and is one of only two states with more women smokers than men, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

- Oklahoma ranks seventh in the nation for smoking prevalence and ninth for smoking-related deaths.

- Oklahoma ranks eighth in the country for smokeless tobacco users.

- As for smokers kicking the habit, Oklahoma ranks 45th.

- The cost of illness and death due to smoking in Oklahoma is more than $1 billion; 20 percent of all deaths in Oklahoma are smoking-related.

- 90 percent of all smokers begin before age 20; 60 percent by age 14.

Synar, D-Muskogee, has avidly touted the health risks of smoking and has pushed for stricter legislation and more taxes against them to pay for health reforms.

Synar called for tobacco - a substance with some 4,000 chemicals - to fall under FDA jurisdiction .

"There is absolutely no reason why this product enjoys this unique status," said Synar, pointing to the tobacco industry's freedom to manufacture, advertise and sell its product with little restriction.

Synar said a smoking ban would be cruel for some 50 million addicted Americans .

A spokeswoman for the Tobacco Growers Information Committee said tobacco is a legal product, and Americans have the right to use it if they choose.

"The tobacco growers are just trying to earn a living producing a legal product," Lisa Eddington said.

Eddington denied the tobacco industry promotes smoking among teens.

Wednesday, the Oklahoma Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission ABLE conducted an undercover sting operation at 11 Oklahoma City stores and four southwestern Oklahoma stores.

Its officials addressed the anti-smoking gathering Thursday. Using a minor to buy cigarettes, chief agent Kevin Barry said eight stores illegally sold cigarettes to him. All were fined .

Reynolds said he has spent half of his $2 million inheritance on anti-smoking measures. He said he sold his R.J. Reynolds stock in 1979 and made his sentiments public in 1989.

Reynolds said he lost his father and brother, both smokers, to emphysema. He said he smoked for 17 years .

While family members were at first "shocked" and "embarrassed" at first, he said they've since accepted his cause.

"My family is fine with it," Reynolds said. "What family I have left."

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NEWS

CITY CONSIDERS TOUGHENING SMOKING LAW, DESPITE THREAT

The Associated Press
385 words
27 September 1994
The Record, Northern New Jersey
All Editions.=.3 Star. 2 Star P. 2 Star B. 1 Star; Late. 1 Star Early
a04

 

As Philip Morris made a thinly veiled threat to move out of New York, the City Council held an emotion-packed hearing Monday on a bill that would extend the city's already tough anti-tobacco law to a ban on smoking in nearly all public places.

But talk of leaving town did not deter Peter Vallone, speaker of the council, who introduced the Smoke-Free Air Act, from trying to protect non-smokers from what he said were the dangers of secondhand smoke.

"This is a health issue, not a wealth issue," he said. "People are dying!"

Philip Morris, which employs 2,000 workers in its Park Avenue headquarters and is a major supporter of New York-based cultural organizations, issued a statement at City Hall denying it ever threatened to leave. But it acknowledged, "We said it was an option we would consider if the proposed legislation passed in its current form."

Ellen Merlo, vice president for corporate affairs for Philip Morris, USA, said it was difficult to justify to the firm's 100,000 employees nationwide having the company'sheadquarters "in a city that prohibits your product in many places."

Asked about the threat, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, said, "I think that should be irrelevant to the debate."

Patrick Reynolds, a grandson of the late founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, spoke in favor of the proposed legislation. He said, "If Philip Morris leaves New York City, I think that New York City can take a lot of pride that a few more drug pushers have left town."

The threat to leave outraged Councilman Anthony Weiner, who told the hearing, "That's what we in Brooklyn call chutzpah!"

Weiner told an audience of 300, about evenly divided on the bill, "I don't know if that's the way you lobby in the tobacco country of North Carolina, but New Yorkers don't like to be threatened!"

He added, "My view is: Go home now!"

Merlo said Phillip Morris supports the rights of non-smokers to have smoke-free areas, but also wants the law to respect the rights of smokers.

The city's present Clean Indoor Air Act, passed six years ago, establishes non-smoking areas in public places.

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BUSINESS

City's Antismoking Bill Debate Rages Proposal pits health vs. economics

By Edith Updike. STAFF WRITER. The Associated Press contributed to this story
601 words
27 September 1994
Newsday
CITY
A41

 Newsday Inc., 1994

The City Council's spacious chamber was packed yesterday for the second hearing on a bill that would strengthen the city's already tough antismoking law. And like a crowd at a college football game, partisans cheered and jeered teams of antismoking activists and medical experts, industry lobbyists and restaurant owners.

In supporting the proposed bill, Patrick Reynolds, a grandson of the late founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company and heir to a tobacco fortune, spoke as a member of Citizens for a Smoke Free America, saying he watched his father and then his older brother die from "smoking the family brands."

But restaurant owners were out in force, protesting that their business will fall off sharply.

"It's not just statistics out of the air," said Scott Wexler of the United Hotel Tariff Association of New York State, quoting a letter from a Massachusetts restaurant owner saying business had dropped 20 percent under a similar law. Sung Soo Kim, president of New York's Korean Small Business Association asked, "How will small business owners {be able to} comply?"

The proposed law would tighten city rules on smoking in public places. It would outlaw the present system of smoking sections in restaurants, hotels and workplaces in favor of "separate smoking rooms." Such a room would have to have its own ventilation system and occupy no more than 25 percent of the total space.

Retail stores that employ fewer than 15 people and restaurants that seat fewer than 50, which are exempt from current rules, would have to comply with the proposed law. Emotions ran high at the hearing. Council member Anthony D. Weiner of Brooklyn was outraged at a report that Philip Morris Cos. was considering pulling its headquarters - and 2,000 jobs - from the city if the bill passed.

"I don't know if that's the way you lobby in the tobacco country of North Carolina, but New Yorkers don't like to be threatened," Weiner told a spokeswoman from the Tobacco Institute, to a chorus of cheers. "If they say ,`We're gonna take our ball and go home' when they don't get their way, my view is: Go home now."

Philip Morris issued a statement at City Hall denying it ever threatened to leave. But it acknowledged, "We said it was an option we would consider if the proposed legislation passed in its current form."

Ellen Merlo, the company's vice president for corporate affairs, said it was difficult to justify to the firm's employees having their headquarters "in a city that prohibits your product in many places." Bars, nightclubs, pool parlors, tobacco businesses and hotel rooms would be exempt from the law.

While most of the legislation's supporters were in the balcony, the main floor was packed with restaurateurs, hoteliers and other business representatives. Fred Sampson, president of the New York State Restaurant Association, warned lawmakers that toughening the antismoking law would harm business, and reminded them that they once said the hotel occupancy tax wouldn't have any effect on business. Now many of them want to eliminate it.

While some council members said economic impact is clearly a concern others remained skeptical.

When a spokesman for the National Smokers Alliance said restaurants and hotels are the largest employers of people of color, and "those are the ones who'll lose their jobs," council member Juanita Williams retorted, "We used to have to pick tobacco, too."

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A NEWS

Tobacco heir turns on industry/Reynolds' grandson claims executives are "drug pushers'

STEFANIE ASIN
Staff
319 words
8 October 1994
Houston Chronicle
2 STAR
34

 

The grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. brought his anti-smoking campaign to Houston Friday, calling tobacco industry executives ""drug pushers.''

In response to the smoking-related deaths of his father and recently his eldest brother, Patrick Reynolds is on a crusade against the tobacco industry. He wants a higher cigarette tax and a ban on tobacco advertising.

""The more I learned about the tobacco companies, the more disturbed I became,'' said Reynolds, speaking at Houston's 10th annual Drug Prevention Conference for Parents and Professionals Friday. ""This business is legal, but it is not ethical.''

Reynolds, whose father died when he was 16, said he is determined to make America smoke-free some day.

""We are fighting a giant here, a behemoth,'' he said. ""I know it's coming.''

Reynolds was instrumental in persuading airlines to ban smoking on short flights and enacting no-smoking laws in California. But he said the road to a smoke-free environment is a rough one because of the power of special-interest groups.

He blames these groups for influencing the lawmakers who are keeping the U.S. cigarette tax the lowest in the world.

Reynolds acknowledged that some of his family members had a hard time dealing with his anti-smoking campaign when it began in 1986. But no one in the Reynolds family has worked for the company for 50 years, he said.

Reynolds spoke to a crowd of educators, parents, law enforcement personnel, therapists and social service employees attending the one-day event. Topics such as alcohol and drug abuse, HIV counseling and conflict management were discussed.

For the first time, the conference included 300 high school students who attended sessions on alcohol and drug abuse. October is Houston Crackdown's drug prevention month.

Mug: Patrick Reynolds

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Westside; PART-J; Zones Desk
CITY HALL ROUNDUP

CITY HALL ROUNDUP

SUSAN STEINBERG
754 words
20 October 1994
Los Angeles Times
Home
13

 The Times Mirror Company; Los Angeles Times 1994  

BEVERLY HILLS: Cigarette vending machines have gone up in a puff of smoke in Beverly Hills. This week, the city became the second on the Westside to adopt an outright ban on use of the machines for cigarette sales.

The Beverly Hills City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to join Santa Monica and 98 cities nationwide in eliminating cigarette vending machines from local stores, restaurants, bars and hotels.

City officials said they took action out of concern that the coin-operated vending machines were easily accessible to youths under 18, who are prohibited by state law from buying cigarettes.

Beverly Hills officials cited a recent survey by the Los Angeles Regional Tobacco Control Community Linkage Project that found a majority of tobacco retailers are willing to sell cigarettes over the counter and through vending machines to underage youths.

"Vending machines are the first places kids actually buy cigarettes," said Beverly Hills anti-smoking activist Dr. Trisha Roth. "Although they may not make up the biggest sales, it's where they make their first purchase."

By making it harder for children to buy cigarettes, a generation of potential smokers will be stopped, said Patrick Reynolds, an anti-smoking activist who is the grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds.

Sixty percent of all smokers begin smoking by the age of 14, said Reynolds, and 90% of all smokers become addicted by the age of 19.

It is unclear how many cigarette vending machines are in Beverly Hills because business owners are not required to report them. Beverly Hills officials said they sent notices on the pending vending machine ban to about 400 local restaurants and stores, but no one spoke in opposition to the prohibition during Tuesday's council meeting.

In 1991, Santa Monica became the second city in the state to ban the vending machines. But it has not enforced the law since a similar law enacted in Rancho Mirage came under a court challenge, Santa Monica City Councilman Kelly Olsen said. In June, however, a federal judge upheld Rancho Mirage's prohibition on cigarette vending machines, and Santa Monica plans to begin enforcing its own ordinance, Olsen said.

Elsewhere on the Westside, West Hollywood does not ban cigarette vending machines, but only allows them to be placed in bars, a city official said. Los Angeles and Culver City, meanwhile, neither restrict nor ban the machines.

SANTA MONICA: Hoping to drive homeless feeding programs indoors, the Santa Monica City Council voted this week to regulate charitable meals programs by requiring that food preparation and serving meet strict county health code standards.

The action Tuesday was the latest attempt by politically liberal Santa Monica to reconcile the nutritional needs of the city's estimated 2,000 homeless with residents' worries about the presence of large numbers of homeless people in city parks.

The new measure, supporters said, does not prohibit serving food on city parkland. But it gives homeless services a strong incentive to conduct feeding programs indoors because the county food preparation and serving standards would otherwise be difficult to meet.

Dozens of people spoke out against the measure, however, with many calling it mean-spirited and saying it would undermine aid to the homeless.

One longtime volunteer in the feeding programs, Dr. Gary Spivey, said he believed most charitable organization would not be able to meet the health code standards-indoors or outdoors-and would stop their meal programs.

"Starvation and malnutrition are bigger problems than food-borne illnesses," Spivey said.

The Los Angeles County Health and Safety codes set standards for food storage, preparation, handling and transport. They also require that food be maintained at certain temperatures and address the dating and packaging of foods for box lunches, according to the city attorney's office.

A February, 1993, city ordinance addressing the feeding of homeless people required that groups had to obtain a permit if more than 35 people gathered in a city park. A federal judge overturned that law in April, ruling that it was a violation of 1st Amendment rights.

On Tuesday, Mayor Judy Abdo cast the sole vote opposing the new food standards ordinance, commenting that some homeless people may be reluctant to eat indoor. The law is expected to take effect in late November after it receives a second reading before the council next week. Byline: SUSAN STEINBERG

PHOTO: Council put cigarette vending machines like this one out of business. / AXEL KOESTER / For The Times

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Grandson of R.J. Reynolds Speaks Out Against Tobaccor

224 words
28 October 1994
The Associated Press Political Service

. The Associated Press.  

PHOENIX AP - The grandson of tobacco industry giant R.J. Reynolds is warning high school students here of the dangers of smoking.

Patrick Reynolds spoke to teen-agers at Washington High School Thursday, including a few who finished cigarettes before filing into an assembly to listen to the 45-minute speech.

"Die your hair green if you want to rebel, but don't start smoking," Reynolds said.

The tobacco-family rebel who gave $1.3 million of his $2.5 million inheritance to battle smoking told teen-agers that they are the target of an industry determined to get them hooked.

"You are their new recruits," Reynolds said. "They are after you."

Reynolds campaigned for Proposition 200, which would add a 40-cent-a-pack tax on cigarettes to raise money for health care for the poor and provide anti-smoking education in schools.

Opponents, funded by the tobacco industry, say there is insufficient oversight on how the money would be spent.

Reynolds, a reformed smoker, said a higher tobacco tax has reduced smoking in other states.

But some students didn't agree.

Nicole Acridge, 15, who said she has been smoking for three years, told Reynolds during a question-and-answer period that the increased tax would force teen-agers to turn to drugs.

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East Tennessee

Reynolds' grandson to speak here Nov. 14

News-Sentinel Washington bureau
356 words
7 November 1994
The Knoxville News-Sentinel
East Tennessee
A3

 

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of R.J. Reynolds cigarette company and an antismoking activist, will speak in Knoxville Nov. 14 on the need to curb smoking to save American lives.

Reynolds, who lives in Beverly Hills, Calif., is scheduled to speak at 2 p.m. at St. Mary's Medical Center in the Emerald Room. The event is open to the public. His visit is sponsored by a health group called the Coalition on Smoking or Health of Knox County.

Reynolds, a former smoker who says his father and brother died from smoking diseases, has become active nationally in trying to pass state and federal laws to restrict smoking. He also is chairman and founder of a non-profit group called Citizens for a SmokeFree America.

"We want to educate the public more about all tobacco issues," said Dr. Peter Carter, a Knoxville cancer specialist and chairman of the coalition. "That's why we're bringing Mr. Reynolds here. We've got to get more public awareness of the health hazards of smoking and the need to make public places smoke-free."

The health coalition represents the local chapters of the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association and American Lung Association, which together have thousands of members.

Among Reynolds' proposals are treating cigarettes like liquor because both can be addictive and hazardous to health, and raising the age for buying cigarettes to 21. Also, he wants to limit U.S. exports of tobacco products abroad to slow the growth of smoking worldwide, and ban all cigarette advertising because it portrays positive images to attract consumers, including youths, to take up the habit.

Former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop has called Reynolds "one of the nation's most influential advocates of a smoke-free America."

After Reynolds' speech the sponsors will hold a panel discussion and take questions from the audience. Members of the panel are to be Carter, Reynolds, Dr. Robert Jenkins of the University of Tennessee's Agriculture Department, and Dr. Donald Ellenburg, a pediatric and adolescent allergist.

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Health & Science

Tobacco firm heir speaks out against smoking

Jacquelyn Brown News-Sentinel staff writer
788 words
14 November 1994
The Knoxville News-Sentinel
B2

 

The tobacco industry is virtual proof that we need government regulation in certain areas, says a grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.

Patrick Reynolds, in Knoxville today for a public forum and briefing on the Act for Clean Indoor Air, is founder of Citizens for a SmokeFree America.

The forum, to be held 2 p.m. in the Emerald Room at St. Mary's Medical Center, is sponsored by the Coalition on Smoking Or Health, an alliance of the American Heart Association, the American Lung Association, and the American Cancer Society. It is open to the public.

Dr. Peter Carter, a cancer specialist on the staff of St. Mary's and Ft. Sanders medical centers, is director of the local coalition, which also has counterparts at the state and national level.

"A lot of people mistakenly believe we're trying to go against smokers and make them feel bad or demonize them, but that's not it," Carter said.

"It's not right to belittle or demean anybody just because they smoke.

"The problem we have is not against people, but against the product - the cigarette and the companies that manufacture them."

According to the Coalition on Smoking Or Health, tobacco is the number one cause of preventable disease and premature death in the United States.

In 1993, 420,000 deaths were caused by direct smoking, and 30,000 to 40,000 deaths were caused by chronic passive smoke, or secondhand smoke.

Many people associate smoking and tobacco with lung cancer, heart disease, emphysema and cancers of the mouth and throat.

However, the coalition claims one-third of all cancers are caused by tobacco.

Dr. Carter explained that while tobacco accounts for 80-90 percent of lung and throat cancers, it is also a significant factor accounting for 20-30 percent of cancers of the esophagus, stomach, kidney, pancreas, liver, colon, bladder and even cervix.

"What happens is there are 4,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke. Forty-three of those are known carcinogens, or cancer-causing agents," said Carter.

"Day after day you breathe those in through the lungs, where there is a healthy blood supply. As the blood circulates through the body, the chemicals are absorbed in the body and are filtered through the kidneys and they come out through the bladder.

"A lot of the chemicals in the smoke are mixed with the saliva and are swallowed. They sit in the esophagus, stomach and bowels, and it's a day after day, year after year sort of thing."

Carter said some cases of leukemia in adults are caused by tobacco. It gets in the bone marrow and damages the blood cells the same way, he said.

"It's a much more complex problem than a lot of people appreciate," Carter said.

"The problem is, it's so hard for people to quit. If you can't quit when you want to, how is that a choice? How is that freedom? They don't tell you that," said Carter.

In highly publicized stories, Reynolds has told how his father in 1964, and his brother Josh RJ Reynolds III earlier this year, died from emphysema caused by his smoking addiction.

He has testified before congressional committees in Washington and in state legislatures around the nation, and he is in demand as a lecturer on the ills of tobacco and the powerful industry lobby.

"No Reynolds family member has worked in the tobacco industry in 50 years," he said.

He began to speak publicly against the industry after considering a request from Sen. Robert Packwood in 1986, prompted by "the memory of my father lying on his deathbed coughing and gasping for breath.

"The more I learned, the more disturbed I became about what was going on," Reynolds said.

The core issue, said the 45-year-old Reynolds, is throwing the special interest lobby out of Washington because of the amount of money they're giving to our politicians.

"That is one of the downsides of bringing the Republicans into power. They are not inclined to believe in government regulation.

Rep. Thomas Bliley, R-Va., a tobacco farmer himself, is a good example," said Reynolds.

The Virginia congressman, who received $93,790 from tobacco-related interests from 1987 to 1992, announced Friday his intent to halt the congressional probe of the tobacco industry if he becomes chairman of the Health and Environment subcommittee. He also vowed to fight the Food and Drug Administration's efforts to regulate tobacco.

"In every case, it comes back to the power of special interests and their contributions to elected officials," said Reynolds.

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East Tennessee

Smoking opponents at forum discuss plight of farmers in Tennessee whose livelihoods depend on tobacco sales

Jacquelyn Brown News-Sentinel staff writer
548 words
15 November 1994
The Knoxville News-Sentinel
East Tennessee
A3

 

In Tennessee, tobacco is the fourth biggest cash-generating agricultural product behind cattle and calves, dairy products, and cotton lint and seeds, according to Dr. Robert P. Jenkins, professor of agricultural economics and research development at the University of Tennessee.

But Tennessee ranks third in the nation for the number of tobacco-related deaths.

Proponents of legislation to regulate smoking in public places, including workplaces, bars and food service establishments, say they are sympathetic to the plight of farmers in East and Middle Tennessee, whose livelihoods depend on tobacco sales.

Dr. Peter Carter, director of the local Coalition on Smoking OR Health, which sponsored the "Smoke-free and Healthy" public forum at St. Mary's Medical Center on Monday, said, "Farmers are in a difficult position because nothing was done to help them make a transition to other crops back when the surgeon general's warnings about smoking hazards first began appearing on cigarette packs."

Keynote speaker Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, however, said, "People who plant tobacco are growing something that is poisoning millions of people."

Reynolds said "it is unethical to make a profit from a product that is killing people." That is why he sold all his stock in the R.J. Reynolds Co. in 1979 - five years before he stopped smoking and seven years before he began to speak publicly against the powerful tobacco industry lobby.

Reynolds also noted that "the production of tobacco is labor-intensive, and the industry is not a friend of the farmer. The price of tobacco is already far down because the industry has found that it's cheaper to produce it abroad."

He said the General Agreements on Tariffs and Trade will make foreign tobacco more readily available.

Jenkins said producers are searching for alternatives to supplement tobacco income, and agricultural researchers and specialists are working to help farmers make the transition from tobacco, which currently generates $250 million a year or one out of every $8 in agricultural income, to other crops.

They are looking at the requirements for alternatives such as fruits and vegetables, mushrooms, horticulture, exotic animal husbandry and rapeseed.

Meanwhile, coalition members, who include the American Cancer Society, the American Lung Association and the American Heart Association, are alarmed about the 73 percent increase in smoking since 1978, and they urged those attending the forum to sign petitions supporting regulation of tobacco products by the Food and Drug Administration.

With the Great American Smokeout on Thursday - the day that is set aside nationwide to encourage Americans to stop smoking - the coalition emphasized the need for smokers to take measures to stop and urged people to encourage state and national legislators to support all tobacco-control measures.

The debate on a draft piece of legislation called the Act for Clean Indoor Air will begin when the General Assembly opens in January. Rep. Wayne Ritchie and Sen. Bud Gilbert have been mentioned as possible sponsors although Ritchie said he still was studying the issue.

photo; Caption: PATRICK REYNOLDS, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, speaks Monday at St. Mary's Medical Center. Heather Stone/News-Sentinel staff

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Scandal for GOP or business as usual?; Gingrich appointment of tobacco ally Tom Bliley expected this week

434 words
6 December 1994
04:33 pm
Business Wire

 c 1994, Business Wire

LOS ANGELES--BUSINESS WIRE--Dec. 6, 1994--``Newt Gingrich is a lackey of the tobacco industry for appointing a proven ally of big tobacco to head a committee on health,'' said Patrick Reynolds Tuesday.

Reynolds is the grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds and president of the Los Angeles-based Citizens for a Smokefree America. Gingrich will announce Bliley's appointment this week.

Gingrich said he plans to install Tom Bliley R-VA as the replacement for Henry Waxman, as head of the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment. Democrat Waxman held the hearings last summer in which the tobacco industry chief executive officers in turn denied that nicotine is addictive.

Bliley recently told the press, ``We don't need any more legislation regulating tobacco.'' He also said, ``We do not need any more anti-tobacco hearings for a while.'' Bliley has accepted close to $100,000 from the tobacco industry, more than any other member of Congress, according to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group PIRG in Washington.

In the past, he sought unsuccessfully to block the EPA's report on second-hand smoke, and has consistently sided with the tobacco industry on other issues.

``Putting this man in charge of a committee dealing with health is outrageous,'' said Reynolds. Gingrich himself has accepted close to $35,000 from the tobacco interests, $10,500 of it in 1994, with much more going in soft money to the GOP, according to PIRG. Waxman does not accept contributions from the tobacco industry.

``Just prior to the election, the Republicans filibustered until they killed campaign finance reform. They've completely omitted it from their 10-point Contract with America. The Republicans are just continuing business as usual in Washington, accepting a continuing flow of special interest contributions directed not only at individuals, but at the party itself,'' said Reynolds.

``This appointment proves that these contributions are influencing both policy and appointments. This will seriously damage the trust Gingrich has said he wants to build with the American people. The Bliley appointment is a dark stain on the reputation of both Gingrich and the GOP. It shouldn't be overlooked.''

On Nov. 16, Gingrich said he may instead put Bliley in charge of the powerful Energy and Commerce Committee, of which the Health subcommittee is only a division. The announcement of Bliley's appointment is expected this week.

CONTACT: Citizens for a Smokefree America, Los Angeles Patrick Reynolds, 310/277-1111 16:33 ET DEC 06, 1994

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Smokefree America Questions Expected Appointment of Tobacco Ally Bliley to Subcommittee on Health and Environment

413 words
6 December 1994
U.S. Newswire

 

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 6 /U.S. Newswire/ -- "Newt Gingrich is a lackey of the tobacco industry for appointing a proven ally of big tobacco to head a committee on health," Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds and president of the Los Angeles-based Citizens for a Smokefree America, said today.

Gingrich said he plans to install Tom Bliley R-Va. as the replacement for Henry Waxman, as head of the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment. Democrat Waxman held the hearings last summer in which the tobacco industry chief executive officers in turn denied that nicotine is addictive.

Bliley recently told the press, "We don't need any more legislation regulating tobacco." He also said, "We do not need any more anti-tobacco hearings for a while." Bliley has accepted close to $100,000 from the tobacco industry, more than any other member of Congress, according to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group PIRG in Washington.

In the past, he sought unsuccessfully to block the EPA's report on second-hand smoke, and has consistently sided with the tobacco industry on other issues.

"Putting this man in charge of a committee dealing with health is outrageous," said Reynolds. Gingrich himself has accepted close to $35,000 from the tobacco interests, $10,500 of it in 1994, with much more going in soft money to the GOP, according to PIRG. Waxman does not accept contributions from the tobacco industry.

"Just prior to the election, the Republicans filibustered until they killed campaign finance reform. They've completely omitted it from their 10-point Contract with America. The Republicans are just continuing business as usual in Washington, accepting a continuing flow of special interest contributions directed not only at individuals, but at the party itself," said Reynolds.

"This appointment proves that these contributions are influencing both policy and appointments. This will seriously damage the trust Gingrich has said he wants to build with the American people. The Bliley appointment is a dark stain on the reputation of both Gingrich and the GOP. It shouldn't be overlooked."

On Nov. 16, Gingrich said he may instead put Bliley in charge of the powerful Energy and Commerce Committee, of which the Health subcommittee is only a division. The announcement of Bliley's appointment is expected this week.

Patrick Reynolds of Citizens for a Smokefree America, 310-277-1111

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Smokefree America Questions Expected Appointment of Tobacco Ally Bliley to Subcommittee on Health and Environment

413 words
6 December 1994
U.S. Newswire

 

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 6 /U.S. Newswire/ -- "Newt Gingrich is a lackey of the tobacco industry for appointing a proven ally of big tobacco to head a committee on health," Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds and president of the Los Angeles-based Citizens for a Smokefree America, said today.

Gingrich said he plans to install Tom Bliley R-Va. as the replacement for Henry Waxman, as head of the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment. Democrat Waxman held the hearings last summer in which the tobacco industry chief executive officers in turn denied that nicotine is addictive.

Bliley recently told the press, "We don't need any more legislation regulating tobacco." He also said, "We do not need any more anti-tobacco hearings for a while." Bliley has accepted close to $100,000 from the tobacco industry, more than any other member of Congress, according to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group PIRG in Washington.

In the past, he sought unsuccessfully to block the EPA's report on second-hand smoke, and has consistently sided with the tobacco industry on other issues.

"Putting this man in charge of a committee dealing with health is outrageous," said Reynolds. Gingrich himself has accepted close to $35,000 from the tobacco interests, $10,500 of it in 1994, with much more going in soft money to the GOP, according to PIRG. Waxman does not accept contributions from the tobacco industry.

"Just prior to the election, the Republicans filibustered until they killed campaign finance reform. They've completely omitted it from their 10-point Contract with America. The Republicans are just continuing business as usual in Washington, accepting a continuing flow of special interest contributions directed not only at individuals, but at the party itself," said Reynolds.

"This appointment proves that these contributions are influencing both policy and appointments. This will seriously damage the trust Gingrich has said he wants to build with the American people. The Bliley appointment is a dark stain on the reputation of both Gingrich and the GOP. It shouldn't be overlooked."

On Nov. 16, Gingrich said he may instead put Bliley in charge of the powerful Energy and Commerce Committee, of which the Health subcommittee is only a division. The announcement of Bliley's appointment is expected this week.

Patrick Reynolds of Citizens for a Smokefree America, 310-277-1111

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Tobacco Foes Speak Up

470 words
9 January 1995
Adweek New England Advertising Week
8
ISSN: 0888-0840

 BPI Communications  Information Access Company. .

New Ads Star Smoking-Gun Testimonials

Tom Weisend

BOSTON - The 'truth' about cigarette makers' marketing tactics is revealed by some surprising sources in a stark and powerful new TV campaign from Houston Effler Herstek Favat here.

The spots, now airing for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, star Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of R.J. Reynolds; Janet Sackman, a model who appeared in cigarette ads in the '40s; and former tobacco industry lobbyist Victor Crawford.

Rarely do testimonial ads pack this much punch, but each person delivers damning words about the tobacco industry they once worked for.

Each of the three subjects were eager to film the spots, said the campaign's co-copywriter Stu Cooperrider, even though both Sackman and Crawford are gravely ill from smoking-related cancers.

The three black-and-white ads tackle the topics of chemical additives in cigarette, marketing to children and the addictive nature of cigarettes.

The Reynolds scion tells viewers that the tobacco industry does not want consumers to find out what's in cigarettes. Shot in a Manhattan eatery, Reynolds says, 'My family's name is printed on the side of seven billion packs of cigarettes every year. Why am I telling you this? Because I want my family to be on the right side for a change.'

Of marketing tobacco to children, lobbyist Crawford says, 'Marketing to kids is unethical, so they the tobacco industry just deny it.' The spot ends with an apology: 'I lied and I'm sorry.'

Sackman, whose vocal chords have been removed because of long-term cigarette smoking, was taped in a beauty parlor. She tells the camera, 'They keep saying you can't get hooked on cigarettes even though many smokers who lose their vocal chords can't quit.'

Cooperrider recalled shooting at Crawford's Rockville, Md.-based office. 'In Victor's office, you could just see his life,' he said. 'He was a big man, a senator and he had all these pictures with heads of state around. But he had to quit the shoot at three o'clock because he literally couldn't go on. It was tough to see him so exhausted.'

Sackman, said Cooperrider, was shot at the hair salon she regularly visits near her home on Long Island. 'She was too ill to travel, but really wanted to do the spot. When she said she was going to have her hair done, it struck us as being so perfect for the ad.'

Cooperrider worked with writer Ken Lewis and art director Dave Gardiner. In September, the Gardiner/Cooperrider team won Best of Show at the Hatch Awards for client Hannaford Bros.

The spots were produced by Harry McCoy; directed by Neil Abramson of Picture Park, New York; and post work was done by Boston-based Finish.

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News

{ photo also ran final p. 9 }

68 words
24 January 1995
The Patriot Ledger Quincy, MA
South; South Star
08b

 

{ photo also ran final p. 9 }

Photo; Caption: Fred Field/The Patriot Ledger - New message - Sterling Middle School seventh graders Tommy Doucette as Joe Camel and Chuck Wan celebrate with classmates after Joe Camel agreed to quit smoking. The skit, performed recently by the Quincy school's acting class, preceded an anti-smoking discussion by R.J. Reynolds' grandson, Patrick Reynolds.

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R.J. Reynolds heir sets anti-tobacco lectures

230 words
15 February 1995
San Antonio Express-News

 

The American Cancer Society, Incarnate Word College and Our Lady of the Lake University present Patrick Reynolds, heir to the R.J. Reynolds fortune who gave up his inheritance to crusade for a smoke-free America.

Reynolds will speak at Incarnate Word College at noon and at Our Lady of the Lake University at 7 p.m. Feb. 28.

The grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, Patrick Reynolds has testified at the federal, state and municipal levels in favor of stronger anti-smoking legislation. In 1989, he co-authored "The Gilded Leaf: Three Generations of the R.J. Reynolds Family and Fortune" history of his family. Reynolds also founded The Foundation for a Smoke-Free America, a non-profit organization dedicated to a smoke-free society.

In his lectures, Reynolds discusses why he made the decision to go against the multibillion-dollar tobacco industry, and how his family feels about his work. He also contends that the tobacco industry is targeting teen-agers, women, Hispanics, blacks and other minorities with their campaigns.

Other issues include secondhand smoke, cigarette advertising, minors' access to tobacco products, and the tobacco lobby. Reynolds also shares his vision of the future and of a smoke-free society.

For information or to attend the lecture, call the American Cancer Society at 614-4211.

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Scion of tobacco magnate foresees smokeless society

Marty Sabota
435 words
3 March 1995
San Antonio Express-News

 

Express News Staff Writer

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco tycoon R.J. Reynolds, brought his anti-smoking campaign here earlier this week in hopes of saving others from tobacco-related illnesses like the ones that killed his father, grandfather and older brother.

The tobacco magnate's grandson spoke about why he turned his back on the family business to crusade for a smoke-free society at two free lectures at Our Lady of the Lake University and Incarnate Word College.

The schools and the American Cancer Society sponsored his appearance.

While waiting to use a pay phone before his Incarnate Word appearance, Reynolds chatted with a student who was puffing on a cigarette outside the Fine Arts Auditorium.

Nineteen-year-old Natasha Florina said she began smoking three years ago to be cool and is now so addicted that even if late to an important appointment, she has to stop for cigarettes.

"I'm hooked," she admitted.

Reynolds didn't chastise her, saying that's not his style.

"Nagging doesn't work," he said.

Instead, his advice for mates is to tell their spouses three times a year, in a single sentence, to quit smoking.

Parents, however, have an obligation to "lay down the law," he added.

In his lectures, Reynolds discusses how the tobacco industry targets youth by the use of billboard advertising, cartoon characters and sports marketing.

Like Florina and 75 percent of adult smokers, Reynolds said he also began smoking before his 18th birthday.

His addiction soon became so great that his father's death from emphysema in 1964 did not cause him to break the habit, which he said emphasizes how strong the "lure of smoking" can be.

Reynolds finally quit in 1985 after 12 attempts, and in 1989 founded the non-profit Foundation for a Smokefree America, which educates young people about the dangers of smoking and the need for increased government regulation of the tobacco industry.

"Tobacco is directly responsible for 419,000 deaths each year in the United States nearly one in five deaths," he said.

Reynolds, 46, believes a smoke-free society is in the future, although not necessarily in his lifetime.

As an example, he pointed out how years ago people were permitted to smoke on airplanes and non-smokers merely grunted and tolerated it. That's no longer true.

Said Reynolds: "And one day, people are going to look back and say, `Hey. Did people ever smoke?' " Reynolds discusses how the tobacco industry targets youth by the use of billboard advertising, cartoon characters and sports marketing.

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METRO
MARYLAND/REGIONAL BRIEFS

MARYLAND/REGIONAL BRIEFS

From Staff and Wire Reports
666 words
3 April 1995
The Baltimore Sun
FINAL
3B

 @ The Baltimore Sun Company

Health center gets $45,500 in gifts, grants

BALTIMORE -- Four gifts totaling $45,500 will allow People's Community Health Center to expand its services to the East Baltimore community.

A $20,000 challenge grant from the Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Foundation was matched by a grant from the Abell Foundation, gifts of $5,000 from the William G. Baker Jr. Fund and $500 from the Morton and Sophia Macht Foundation.

The money will be used to buy property near the center, which has been providing free medical care for 25 years at 3028 Greenmount Ave. Administrative offices and certain services the center provides will be shifted to 3011-3013 Greenmount, said Patricia S. Cassatt, the center's executive director.

Tobacco heir to speak on dangers of smoking

BALTIMORE -- Patrick Reynolds, tobacco heir turned anti-smoking crusader, will speak on the dangers of smoking and the industry he now opposes at noon tomorrow at Loyola College.

Mr. Reynolds, grandson of tobacco mogul R. J. Reynolds, quit a pack-a-day habit, sold his tobacco stock and launched a campaign against smoking and the industry his family helped build. Some relatives have disowned him as a result. His $2.9 million inheritance finances his efforts as chairman of Citizens for a Smoke Free America.

His lecture, in McGuire Hall, is part of National Collegiate Health Week.

Van runs stop sign, strikes tree, killing driver

RISING SUN -- A Rising Sun woman was killed early yesterday when her van left a highway outside the town and crashed into a tree, police said.

Patsy Darlene Atwood, 52, was driving a 1986 Plymouth Voyager west on Route 273 about 12:45 a.m. when it ran a stop sign at U.S. 1, went over an embankment and struck a tree, police said.

Debris on railroad track causes train to spill fuel

PORT DEPOSIT -- Authorities yesterday were assessing the damage caused when a Conrail locomotive hit debris on the tracks at Port Deposit and spilled about 300 gallons of diesel fuel into the Susquehanna River, officials said.

The spill at about 7 p.m. Saturday was contained within floating booms, and water treatment facilities downriver in Perryville were not affected, said John K. Chlada, director of emergency responses for the Maryland Department of the Environment. He said officials were checking whether the spill may have fouled soil along the railroad tracks.

Mr. Chlada said Conrail hired a Baltimore firm to clean up the fuel in the river. An investigation, expected to be complete within the next few days, into the cause of the spill may determine whether the company will be fined by the Department of the Environment or the U.S. Coast Guard.

Mount St. Mary's opens $2.4 million auditorium

EMMITSBURG -- Mount St. Mary's College opens its new $2.4 million auditorium tomorrow with a lecture by social critic and consumer advocate Ralph Nader at 1:30 p.m.

The 500-seat auditorium includes two classrooms and a seminar room. Lectures and other events were previously held in a chapel, a former gymnasium or a small auditorium in the science building.

Work on the building began last spring. The project has largely been financed by a $2 million gift from Henry and Marion Knott, longtime benefactors of the college and Catholic education.

Man run over, killed; van involved is abandoned

FORESTVILLE -- Police were trying to unravel the circumstances surrounding the death of a man who was run over by a van on the Capital Beltway early yesterday.

The victim -- described as about 6 feet 2 inches tall with a muscular build -- was struck about 4:30 a.m. on the inner loop of the beltway, north of Route 4 in Forestville.

Investigators obtained the man's fingerprints in hopes of establishing his identity. They were also searching for the driver and the owner of the van, which was abandoned and had out-of-state tags.

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News

Former cigarette ad man gives insider's account Tells students, `These ads are lies'

Heesun Wee
The Patriot Ledger
708 words
13 April 1995
The Patriot Ledger Quincy, MA
Suburban Final
10f

 

NORWOOD -- Former Winston cigarette model David Goerlitz strutted back and forth across the junior high school stage yesterday, vilifying the ads he helped create.

"Here I am with a cigarette, crouching next to 10,000 flammable pounds of jet fuel," he said with a laugh, pointing to the projection screen behind him. It showed him and another model crouching beneath an airplane. They looked tough. Rugged. Cool.

But Goerlitz said cigarettes and fuel are a disastrous mix and the ad defies logic. "These ads are lies," he boomed into a microphone during his hour-long presentation.

Loud and flamboyant, Goerlitz spoke to 800 junior high students, assailing tobacco manufacturers for associating cigarettes with a healthy, happy lifestyle.

Student Evelyn Seijido was listening.

"I learned how the tobacco industry tries to trick you," Seijido, 11, said after the assembly. "The ads put you in a trance." But the sixth-grader said she won't be lured to smoke by ads.

Goerlitz, 44, shared other slides of ads, some portraying slim, glamorous women smiling and holding cigarettes.

"I know her. Her teeth are white. She never smokes," said Goerlitz, pointing to the screen.

Goerlitz was one of six male models featured in the "Search and Rescue" advertisement series that depicted a mountain rescue team in action. In one ad, Goerlitz clings to a mountain bluff. He looks rugged, handsome and healthy. In reality, Goerlitz, who then was smoking 3 1/2 packs a day, said he could barely breathe while the photographer took pictures.

The New Jersey resident is a key part of the state Department of Public Health's "Truth Campaign," which was unveiled in December. The campaign features men and women who formerly worked for the tobacco industry but now are publicly speaking out against the billion-dollar trade.

Other campaign members include Victor Crawford, a former tobacco lobbyist; Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of R.J. Reynolds; and Janet Sackman, a former Lucky Strike model who has throat cancer.

Goerlitz's speech in Norwood is one of 15 he will give this week at schools and youth centers.

State health officials say teenagers are likely to listen to Goerlitz because he was part of the tobacco industry. "I'm credible. I come alive from the ads," he said.

Goerlitz said he began smoking at 13 in an attempt to seem cool and mature. At 34, he suffered a stroke and now has no feeling in his left leg and no sense of taste.

He eventually quit smoking and decided to speak publicly about his experiences, hoping to persuade youths not to start using tobacco.

Goerlitz said he speaks to young people because they are the most vulnerable to tobacco ads. Most children who smoke start in the seventh grade or in the first year of high school, according to recent research.

At that critical time, boys and girls are searching for their identities and sometimes turn to tobacco as a way to feel more confident and cool, said Sean Fitzpatrick, a health department spokesman.

But some Norwood teens already have fallen victim to the myths and images offered in the advertisements.

"I started smoking two weeks ago with a friend because it's cool," said Bill, 14, who declined to give his last name. "My father will kill me if he found out."

Even after Goerlitz's presentation, Bill said he will continue smoking.

Following the assembly, about a dozen boys and girls flooded the stage, beseeching Goerlitz for autographs. One of the last of the group was Patty Miley, 12.

"How can you get someone you love to stop smoking?" the a sixth-grader asked. Goerlitz advised using lots of love and persistence. "Making them feel guilty works, too," he said with a smile.

Miley said she will ask her father to quit smoking for Easter in lieu of presents. "When my dad gets home from work today, I'm going to ask, `Can you stop smoking?' "

Goerlitz and the campaign are part of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program, which is funded by the 25-cent tax on cigarettes approved in 1992.

Photo; Caption: Goerlitz

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Section 6

PATRICK REYNOLDS

By ALEXANDRA BANDON
38 words
21 May 1995
New York Times Abstracts
Pg. 18, Col. 1

c. 1995 New York Times Company

Brief interview with Patrick Reynolds, former smoker and grandson of tobacco magnate R J Reynolds, who is now director of Foundation for a Smokefree America; excerpts; photo 'Sunday' column

S

Photographs

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News

A PUFF OF FAME State anti-smoking spots win international award

93 words
5 July 1995
The Patriot Ledger Quincy, MA
Run Of Paper
06

 

BOSTON -- Two anti-smoking television commercials prepared for the state Department of Public Health won awards at the 42nd annual International Advertising Festival in Cannes, France.

The spots were part of the media campaign by the department's tobacco control program.

The commercials depict Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the founder of the RJ Reynolds cigarette company, and Janet Sackman, former Lucky Strike cigarette model.

Both are crusaders against smoking.

The commercials were created by the advertising firm Houston Effler Herstek Favat.

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Partners in Verve. Houston Effler and Partners creative directors Rich Herstek and Peter FavatSpecial Report: Creative Directors/East

James Fadden
836 words
15 September 1995
SHOOT
49
Vol. 36, No. 37

 BPI Communications

After five years, Rich Herstek and Peter Favat still get a charge out of each other. It's extremely contagious.

Agencies in a slump looking for some kind of miracle would be well-advised to pay heed to the team of Rich Herstek and Peter Favat. Since joining Houston Effler & Partners, Boston, as creative directors in 1992, their bold, creative work has helped grow the agency by more than $110 million in billings.

Last year they were made partners, as the agency became Houston Effler Herstek Favat. Within that brief capsule of time their strategy has provided a textbook example of how to electrify concepts, win a shopping cart load of awards and broaden client appeal. Their ideas range from cross-dressing Larry Johnson for Converse to the dead serious antismoking campaign now airing in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Herstek and Favat met in 1991, when they were both working at Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson, Boston. Before that Herstek had worked at Cole & Weber, Portland, Ore.; DDB Needham, Washington, D.C.; and Lord Geller Fredrico Einstein, New York. Favat was stationed at Lintas:New York, where he worked on Coca-Cola. At Ingalls, Quinn, the creative directors were both assigned to the Converse account.

"It was love at first sight," Herstek says. "We both saw the potential for Converse, a client in a bit of disarray at the time. I grew up with Chuck Taylor shoes; Converse was an institution right up there with Levi's and Harley-Davidson. They deserved better, and we were determined to give it to them."

Their first move was to sign Larry Johnson, fresh out of UNLV and not yet signed to the NBA. Favat remembers springing the idea on the ballplayer.

"I went to a meeting with him. The guy's fun, confident and able to laugh at himself, so I felt comfortable with the concept. I flipped a picture over, featuring Grandmama, a basketball player in a dress. He cracked up and said he would think about it."

Grandmama, now on the Charlotte Hornets' roster, roared down the lane for three years, but now it's time for new ideas - "although we aren't ruling out the prospects for her return," Herstek says. "Kids have a short attention span and don't want to keep seeing the same thing."

When the creative team brought the Converse account over to Houston Effler, major adjustments were made to accommodate the growth. "The agency was predominantly retail," Favat explains. "We told people they weren't going to be fired. We interviewed everyone and evaluated them. Over time we saw that some were team players and others weren't. If you're a prima donna, you're an idiot."

Pas de Deux

The partnership remains a pure collaboration. "I can't say enough great things about Peter," Herstek says. "He's always soliciting ideas."

"Our offices are next to each other and we work really closely," Fayat notes. "We've never had a fight - maybe we've had one minor disagreement. He's got tons of strengths and no weaknesses.

"If he's black, I'm white, or vice versa. We're like two cops walking a beat. Also, the lines blur; I'm the art director but may write a few lines, while he's the copywriter and he may come up with the look."

Herstek and Favat are regular attendees of the Sick and Twisted Animation Festival that stops in Boston every year as part of its national tour. A lot of the attendees wear Converse shoes, which inspired them to contract several of the animators to apply their macabre styles to the Converse campaign. "If they ever did a commercial before, it was to help people render jumping candy," Favat says.

Herstek adds: "If you think we're wild you ought to talk to the animators. I was on the phone with one of them and he told me, 'I gotta go; I just soiled myself.'"

Although they've explored hideous, outlandish, provocative concepts in animated spots like "Lupo's Nightmare" and "Too Much Coffee Man," for Converse, these executives are also capable of deftly handling life-and-death concepts. For the Massachusetts Department of Health they've produced a series of startling, graphic antismoking spots, centering on the theme "It's time we made smoking history." "We pitched it three years ago," Favat says. "It's a great account."

Perhaps the most dramatic PSA features Patrick Reynolds, grandson of R.J. Reynolds, claiming, "I just want my family to be on the right side of things for a change." Other states are negotiating for the rights to air the campaign.

In just five years Favat and Herstek reinvigorated a classic American account with huge doses of adrenaline, reorganized an agency and garnered praise from all corners. Who says the American Dream is dead?

illustration photograph

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He's butting in to saves lives Son of cigarette company family recalls tobacco's legacy of death.

Mary Ann Sabo
614 words
27 September 1995
The Grand Rapids Press
a1

 

The Grand Rapids Press

After his parents divorced, Patrick Reynolds missed his father for six years. He remembers being overjoyed when one of his letters prompted a reunion - and dismayed to find his dad struggling for every breath, dying from emphysema.

Cigarettes, Reynolds knows, robbed him of his father. His oldest brother. His cousin. An aunt. Tobacco hastened his mother's death and killed his grandfather.

Reynolds relived each of those deaths Tuesday night as he spoke to a small crowd in Grand Rapids. That he's a virulent opponent of the tobacco industry is particularly surprising, considering his family tree.

Reynolds is the grandson of tobacco scion R.J. Reynolds, who turned a small-time chewing tobacco business into one of the most successful tobacco companies in the world.

"I guess we find our greatest glory in our deepest wound," Reynolds explained. "I lost my dad, and this is who I've become."

Reynolds turned his back on his patrimony in 1979, selling all of his tobacco stock because he "didn't want to earn money from a product that causes diseases and death." Yet he made that call to his stockbroker with a cigarette in one hand. It was another six years before he could kick his 17-year habit.

After Reynolds' 1986 testimony before a congressional subcommittee on the need to ban cigarette advertising, he founded and now chairs the non-profit group Citizens for a Smokefree America, touring the country with his very personal diatribe against tobacco.

He had fingers enough to point during his talk at the Kent Intermediate School District - at Republicans who've let themselves be bought with tobacco dollars, at advertisements which specifically target children, and at the industry itself, which he says is responsible for one of every five deaths in America.

"The reason we've failed to regulate tobacco products . . . is because of the amount of money that flows to the Republicans," explained Reynolds, 46. "The tobacco industry is the single greatest beneficiary of the Republican agenda.

"Campaign finance reform should have been one of the points in their Contract with America."

The steady increase in teen smokers serves as a principal rallying point for Reynolds, who agrees with proposed Federal Drug Administration regulations that would limit minors' access to cigarettes and restrict advertising. But Reynolds thinks the proposed regulations, which will likely be voted on in November, don't go far enough.

He advocates licensing tobacco vendors in the same way liquor sales are regulated. He'd like to see 21 become the minimum age for purchasing cigarettes. And he wants to see the tax on tobacco raised to a level that would become prohibitive for teens.

"If we don't get to kids, we're missing it," Reynolds said. "We're missing the boat.

"Education can make some different - but raising the taxes can make a whole lot of difference."

Reynolds told parents and educators who attended the forum that teens are especially vulnerable to the manipulations of the tobacco industry, at an age when peer pressure and unhappiness also contribute to the habit.

Reynolds is spending six days lecturing throughout West Michigan. His Grand Rapids visit was jointly sponsored by KISD and the Smoke-free Air for Everyone Tobacco Reduction Coalition SAFE of Kent County.

The non-profit, all-volunteer organization was born in 1989 from the efforts of school and public health officials.

"The tobacco interests have the greatest control at the state level. They don't have that control at the community level," SAFE Coordinator Meredith Reeves said.

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SMOKING KILLS, SAYS GRANDSON OF R.J. REYNOLDS

By Lois M. Collins, Human Services Writer
456 words
5 October 1995
Deseret News
B1

 c 1995 Deseret News Publishing Co.

Smoking killed Patrick Reynolds' family. His grandfather, father, aunts, brother and cousin all died of cancers, most of them directly related to tobacco use.

Ironically, tobacco is also how that family made its fortune. Reynolds' grandfather founded the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company in 1875.

Wednesday, Reynolds brought a strong anti-smoking message to Utah during the 17th annual Fall Conference on Substance Abuse in Park City. Tobacco, he said, kills more people each year than AIDS, alcohol, auto accidents, suicide, cocaine and heroin use combined. It is also the second-most heavily advertised product today. Each year tobacco companies spend $4,500 in advertising per new smoker who becomes addicted. And that investment pays the companies back as those smokers develop a lifetime addiction.

Such advertising needs to be banned, according to Reynolds.

The good news, he said, is America can - and will - become a smoke-free society eventually. But much must be done to achieve that, beginning with stopping the flow of tobacco-lobby money to influential members of Congress. The Republican Party's ``pro-business attitude'' has been of great benefit to the tobacco companies, which contributed more than $1.5 million to the GOP, he said.

Reynolds believes that the tax on cigarettes must be raised, so that children will be less able to buy the product. America has the lowest cigarette taxes in the industrialized world. And since children are freely able to buy cigarettes almost anywhere, he supports banning vending machines entirely.

Tobacco companies have justified advertising tobacco as a free-speech issue. Reynolds said that is now being challenged as ``commercial speech, which must endeavor to tell the truth.'' The truth, Reynolds said, is tobacco kills.

An unnamed county tackled its youthful smokers problem recently. The county licensed merchants to sell tobacco, then used the licensing revenue to run sting operations. Merchants found selling to youths a third time lost their right to sell tobacco. The youth access rate fell from 80 percent to 1 percent.

Stopping youths from starting smoking is crucial, he said, because 60 percent of the 54 American million smokers started before they were 14. A full 90 percent were smokers by 19. He tells youths if they can resist the temptation to smoke until they are 19, they will never smoke.

``One of these days, we are going to have a smoke-free, drug-free environment,'' Reynolds said. ``It's going to happen. We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes. One of these days - and it might be in our children or grandchildren's times - we're going to look back and say, `Did people ever smoke?' ''

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Utah

Tobacco Heir Says Smoking Deadly, Not a Social Grace

Nancy Hobbs THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE
688 words
5 October 1995
The Salt Lake Tribune
B2

 

Contrary to what cigarette advertising tries to convey, smoking is not attractive, is not socially acceptable, and is hardly as prevalent as tobacco marketing campaigns would like consumers to believe, says the grandson of R.J. Reynolds -- founder of the second largest tobacco company in America.

But cigarettes are highly addictive -- comparable to heroin or cocaine, Patrick Reynolds told an audience of West High School students Wednesday afternoon. Furthermore, he warned the students, the target of ``predatory'' tobacco advertising is them: teen-agers staking out ways to demonstrate their maturity and independence.

Sixty percent of all smokers start the habit by age 14; by 19, 90% of the people who smoke are addicted, Reynolds said.

``That means almost nobody gets addicted to smoking after 19. Only one in 10 smokers becomes addicted after that age.

``So my message here is, go dye your hair green, wear weird clothes, but don't smoke cigarettes. . . . Don't get hooked. Find another way to step apart. Hopefully, you'll find responsible ways to do that.''

Reynolds told his audience, and participants in a substance-abuse conference at Park City earlier in the day, that the U.S. government isn't doing enough to dissuade teens from a habit that kills almost half a million Americans annually -- more than the number killed by automobile accidents, AIDS, homicide and fires combined.

``First of all, we've done very little to stop children from buying cigarettes,'' he said.

He also complained that taxes on cigarettes are lower in the United States than in any other industrialized country. Taxes should be increased to cover at least the medical costs of smoking-related diseases -- more than $2 per pack, Reynolds said.

And a complete ban on cigarette advertising, following the lead of France, Canada and Russia, is morally and ethically correct.

``Private speech is, and should be, protected by the right of freedom of speech,'' he said. ``But commercial speech must tell the public the truth. Tobacco ads are outrageous lies, and therein lies the legal basis for banning tobacco advertising.''

Also ``outrageous,'' said Reynolds, is the money spent by the tobacco lobby to ensure that elected officials reject those suggestions. Over the past decade, $16.7 million was handed out to politicians -- ``and no corporations ever gave away that much money without expecting something in return.''

Already this year, $1.5 million has been paid to Republicans and $313,000 has been given to Democrats, said Reynolds, who founded Citizens for a Smokefree Society in Beverly Hills six years ago.

The tobacco heir's lecture spawned several questions from the student audience, including what family members think of Reynold's outspoken disdain for the industry that made his family wealthy, and how does he defend accepting royalties from R.J. Reynolds?

``They're pretty cool about it,'' Reynolds said of his two surviving brothers. ``I don't have much family left. Most have died because of smoking.''

Besides his father, a heavy smoker who died of emphysema when Patrick Reynolds was 15, he also lost his mother, two aunts and, most recently, a brother -- R.J. Reynolds III.

Reynolds said he divested all of his holdings in the tobacco company in 1979, ``because I didn't want to make money off a product that I knew was killing people.''

When two more shares were later given to Reynolds by a half-brother who made Reynolds promise not to sell them, he instead donated them to a voter-initiative campaign to increase the cigarette tax in California.

West High freshman Stacy Harden said the presentation sent a strong message.

``I didn't realize that most people who are addicted to smoking started so young,'' said the 14-year-old. If she can avoid the lure of ``Josephine Camel'' until she is 19, she said, ``then I'm on the safe side.''

Lynn R. Johnson/The Salt Lake Tribune Patrick Reynolds, a grandson of tobacco mogul R.J. Reynolds, tells West High students tobacco is as addictive as cocaine or heroin.

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TEENAGERS SHOULD LISTEN TO TOBACCO COMPANY HEIR

540 words
6 October 1995
Deseret News
A10

 c 1995 Deseret News Publishing Co.

Patrick Reynolds speaks from experience when he describes the effects of tobacco - the experience of losing more than his share of family members to cancer because of tobacco use, and experience from the perspective of the tobacco distributor.

Reynolds is a grandson of the founder of the huge R.J. Reynolds Tobacco, but he was in Salt Lake City this week to bring teenagers a message about the dangers of tobacco use.

An enthusiastic campaigner against smoking and cigarette advertising, Reynolds is a survivor in a family that has dwindled as a result of tobacco use - his grandfather, father, mother, aunts, brother and cousin all died of tobacco-related cancers.

At the Fall Conference of Substance Abuse and in a speech at West High School, Reynolds said tobacco kills more people each year than AIDS, alcohol, auto accidents, suicide, cocaine and heroin use combined. It was a message young people need to hear, and Reynolds is a credible spokesman.

Since nine of 10 smokers become addicted before the age of 19, Reynolds' warning was aimed at cigarette advertising targeting the young. He said bluntly that advertising is predatory. Its objective is to get young people addicted to tobacco.

Reynolds grew up hearing quite a different story. His family made a fortune in tobacco, and most members of his family smoked. But he also saw for himself the ravages of tobacco use. He is now outspoken against tobacco companies and especially against tobacco lobbyists and the money they spend to influence members of Congress.

He told the high school audience that in the past decade, $16.7 million has been given to politicians by tobacco companies. And, as he said, ``no corporations ever gave away that much money without expecting something in return.''

Reynolds is a good example of a man who has learned from the mistakes of others - in his case, the fatal mistakes of his loved ones. He is trying now to teach that lesson to the potential victims of tobacco advertising.

Reynolds has divested all of his holdings in the tobacco company. He said he donated several shares given to him after the divestiture to a campaign in California to increase that state's cigarette tax.

He supports higher cigarette taxes in all states and lobbies for a total ban on cigarette advertising, saying that would be morally and ethically correct and citing other countries - France, Canada and Russia - that have taken that step.

Many people, including health and youth advocates, speak out against tobacco advertising, but Reynolds speaks with authority. Some politicians give lip service to the same proposals, but many are not willing to take action.

Patrick Reynolds is convincing because of what he has been willing to sacrifice in order to spread the anti-smoking word. He tells the truth in a way that is hard to ignore. He puts the cards on the table: There is nothing socially acceptable about smoking. It can and does kill people. He's a walking testament to how it can ruin lives.

But he believes young people are smart enough to choose not to become addicted. The United States will some day be smokeless, he says. We hope he is right.

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PENINSULA FRIDAY
SCHOOL NOTES

New School Extension To Open in Burlingame

John Wildermuth
785 words
10 November 1995
The San Francisco Chronicle
FINAL
P3

 

.

Burlingame residents will be able to see Monday what they got for the $12 million in school bonds they approved in March 1993, thanks to a special celebration at Burlingame Intermediate School.

The 7 p.m. event marks the completion of the new Bob Welch Wing at the Burlingame School District's lone intermediate school. The wing, named after the school's longtime principal, who retired last year, houses two new science labs, two computer rooms, an art classroom/ studio and four other classrooms. Visitors will be able to tour the new facility, which is designed to serve the district's increasing enrollment.

Money from the bond measure was also used to make needed improvements to the district's elementary schools. MINORITY FIGURES: For the first time ever, Asian students are the largest minority group in the San Mateo Union School District. Figures for the new semester show 1,592 Asian students in the district's seven high schools, just slightly more than the 1,583 Latinos enrolled.

The district also has 311 Filipino students and 292 black students. Overall, minorities make up 49.96 percent of the district's students, compared to 48.33 percent last year and 47.96 percent the year before that. Figures supplied by the district show that the total number of white students also dropped for the third straight year. SEQUOIA UNION DISTRICT: The percentage of minority students continued to rise in the Sequoia Union High School District this year. Figures released by the district show that just over 60 percent of the 6,464 students at the four comprehensive high schools are from racial minorities.

Latino students now make up about 38 percent of the district's enrollment, compared with 36 percent last year and just 12 percent in 1981-82, district figures show. About 40 percent of the district's students are white, down from 41 percent last year and 68 percent in 1981-82.

Blacks make up a little more than 11 percent of the enrollment, while Asian and Pacific Islanders are about 10 percent of the total.

Enrollment in the district overall is up by 98 students from last year. ATHERTON: The Sacred Heart Community Players will open their production of the musical "The Pajama Game" tonight at 7:30 in the Little Theatre on the high school's Atherton campus.

The show will run for the next two weekends, with performances at 7:30 p.m., except for 2:30 p.m. matinees on Sundays. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children and are available at the Sigall Building on campus.

The theater group is made up of students, faculty and staff members from both Sacred Heart Prep and St. Joseph's School. More information is available by calling 322-1866. REDWOOD CITY: Patrick Reynolds, grandson of the late tobacco mogul R.J. Reynolds, will talk about the dangers of smoking at Canada College in Redwood City on Monday as part of the community college's weeklong KICK-BUTT tobacco wellness fair.

Reynolds launched a national campaign against the tobacco industry after his grandfather died of lung cancer. In recent years, he has worked toward banning cigarette advertising.

The free talk, sponsored by the Canada Associated Student Association, the campus Health Center and Kaiser Hospital, will be at noon in the college's Main Theatre and will be followed by a question-and-answer session. More information is available by calling 306-3433. SAN BRUNO: A successful reading program at Parkside Intermediate School has received a boost from a local business owner.

Dennis Sammut, owner of Artichoke Joe's card room in San Bruno, along with the Sammut Family Foundation, have given $50,000 for a reading program designed by Parkside teachers to boost the reading skills of about 60 seventh- and eighth-graders at the school.

The donation comes on top of a $55,000 contribution the Sammuts made last year to get the program up and running.

The reading program gets groups of five or six students together twice a week before or after school or at lunch to discuss books, write in journals and participate in trivia contests involving the books they are reading, said Susan Speyer, vice principal at Parkside. Tests after the program showed the students were doing better, and parents reported better attitudes toward reading.

The Sammut money was also used to weed old materials from the Parkside media center and prepare to link it with the San Bruno Public Library. --------------------

Information for School Notes can be mailed to The Chronicle, 401 Marshall Street, Redwood City 94063 or faxed to 415 299-9208.

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PENINSUL
PENINSULA DATELINES

PENINSULA DATELINES

Compiled from Examiner staff and wire reports
840 words
10 November 1995
San Francisco Examiner
SECOND
P-3

 

New presentation

by Children's Theatre

Palo Alto The Palo Alto Children's Theatre and the Escondido Elementary School PTA will present "The Elves and the Shoemaker" Nov. 16-18 at 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto.

Based on Grimm's fairy tale, the play was written by Michael Litfin, assistant director of the Children's Theatre. The play revolves around the merriment of mischievous elves who upset an entire village until the full moon rises.

Tickets are $2 for children and $4 for adults. For more information, call 415 329-2651.

Gustafson elected

symphony board chair

San Jose The San Jose Symphony Board of Directors has elected S. Reid Gustafson as its chairman.

Gustafson, a member of the board since 1988, succeeds Charles J. Hart.

"I am looking forward to the challenge of leading this fine orchestra as it moves to the next level of artistic excellence and expands its role in the community," Gustafson said.

Top award for

Alza founder

Palo Alto Dr. Alejandro Zaffaroni, founder and co-chairman of Alza Corp. of Palo Alto, was awarded the National Medal of Technology in ceremonies at the White House, according to a company spokesman.

The medal is the highest award presented by the president for technological innovation.

Zaffaroni, a native of Uruguay, holds 43 patents. He was honored by President Clinton for his accomplishments in the fields of drug delivery and drug discovery. His patents include drugs that can be administered through skin patches, orally and through the uterus.

Coyote Point features

Bay Area animals

San Mateo Bay Area animals will be featured at Coyote Point Museum's Family Activity Days Saturday and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Emphasis, along with the crafts, games and stories, will be on the appearance of several of the museum's handleable creatures, most of which can be spotted in local backyards.

Each day's program is free, with the usual museum admission of $3 for adults; $2 seniors; and $1 for students ages 6 through 17.

The museum is located at 1651 Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo. For more information call 415 342-7755.

Junior Auxiliary's

outdoor funding

San Mateo San Mateo County's Outdoor Education Program is $42,000 richer this year, thanks to the generosity of the Junior Assistance League of San Mateo County.

The league has contributed $33,000 in student scholarships and $9,000 toward the Nature Lab to support the efforts of young scientists, who might otherwise be deprived of the opportunity.

Junior Auxiliary donations have provided outdoor scholarships for more than 20 years to more than 27 schools in San Mateo County.

Those interested in taking a guided tour of the Nature Lab should call 415 802-5360.

Free guitar

concert Tuesday

Redwood City A free guitar concert is set for Tuesday at 8 p.m. at Canada College's Main Theatre, when its music students will present music for the entire family and perform a variety of guitar selections. For more information call 415 306-3336.

Quilting Exposed

San Mateo Peninsula Quilters will get the lowdown on "Watercolor Quilts" from the authors of the book - Pat Magaret and Donna Slusser - at its Wednesday meeting at 9 a.m. at the San Mateo Garden Center, 605 Parkside Way, San Mateo.

The public is invited. There is a $3 fee. For more information call 415 592-3571.

Patrick Reynolds

to speak on smoking

Redwood City Tobacco mogul Patrick Reynolds, one of the nation's most influential advocates of a smoke-free America, will speak at Redwood City's Canada College Monday at noon in the college's main theater.

Reynolds, grandson of tobacco-scion R.J. Reynolds, launched a national campaign against the tobacco industry after the death of his famous grandfather, who died of lung cancer. He also saw his father, oldest brother and other relatives die from tobacco-induced cancer and emphysema.

For more information call 415 306-03433.

County fair

salutes volunteer

San Mateo Joe Murphy, who has spent hundreds of hours volunteering for the county fair's 4-H / FFA auction, has been awarded the fair's annual Western Fairs Association Blue Ribbon Award.

Murphy, Bank of America branch manager in Menlo Park, began donating his free time to the county fair auction 13 years ago, at about the same time he was hired as an assistant manager at the bank.

During the one-day 4-H / FFA auction, Murphy oversees all the financial aspects and manages the staff that collects money and tabulates sales. He also tracks the flow of auction funds, which amounts to about $80,000 annually.

Free lecture

on volcanoes

San Mateo The U.S. Geological survey will present a free lecture, "Long Valley, California, A Restless Caldera," Thursday at 7 p.m. in the conference room of USGS Building 3, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park.

The lecture will focus on the geological history and current conditions of the volcanic Long Valley area.

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Humble pie. advertising agency Houston Herstek FavatTop Regional Agencies

Daniela Gilbert
1,148 words
12 July 1996
SHOOT
28
Vol. 37, No. 28

 BPI Communications

Boston's Houston Herstek Favat, fresh from another win at Cannes, remains modest as billings continue to rise.

It's uncommon for an agency with mostly regional work to rack up an extra $138 million in four short years. Houston Herstek Favat has managed to do just that while creating some very real, touching and intense work for clients like the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Converse and now Fidelity Investments.

All this thanks to creative directors Richard Herstek and Peter Favat, who have managed to remain humble in a business that often features an attitude du jour. Herstek, whose writing has garnered awards from a number of organizations - including the Clios and Effies - joined the then-called Houston, Effler & Partners in 1992. Before that, he was busy with Favat at Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson, Boston, working on Converse ads like "Grandmama," with Charlotte Hornets forward Larry Johnson.

Favat - who says that at age 10 he knew art direction was for him - spent some time at SSC&B Lintas in New York, working on such clients as Diet Coke before joining IQ&J in 1987.

At Houston Herstek Favat, the creative team has made its mark with a series of anti-smoking PSAs for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. When creating these spots, Favat says they didn't want to make people feel bad for smoking: "We didn't want kids to think it's uncool to smoke; we'd rather them think it's cooler not to."

For the "Truth" campaign directed by Neil Abramson of Palomar Pictures, Los Angeles, which won both a Gold and Silver Lion at the Cannes Advertising Festival last year, the agency assembled a powerful cast to address the dangers of smoking: Victor Crawford, an anti-smoking lobbyist, who recently died of lung cancer; Patrick Reynolds, tobacco-great R.J. Reynolds' grandson; and Janet Sackman, a former cigarette model who developed lung and throat cancer, and had half of her lungs and larynx removed. The spots are compelling, especially when you hear what's left of Sackman's voice and then see shots of her as a thriving young model, cigarette in hand.

"For these people, telling their stories is like going on the stand - like a public testimony," Favat says.

Both Favat and Herstek thank the client for the opportunity to showcase this unique insight in their spotwork, adding that it was in fact the client that helped to come up with names of people to use in the spots. "Our relationship with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health is one of the strongest agency/client relationships in the country," Herstek says. "I've never seen a partnership work quite like this before."

Strong Message

The latest campaign for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health includes several spots directed by Tony Kaye of Tony Kaye Films, West Hollywood and London. In "Happy Birthday" - which picked up a Bronze Lion at last month's Cannes Festival - a man whose larynx has been removed and has no voice left, sings "Happy Birthday" through an electrolarynx, a machine that acts as a voice box, but sounds like a robot.

"We were interviewing cancer patients for the spots and met this man," Favat says. "He said he'd sung 'Happy Birthday' at his granddaughter's birthday party, and she got so scared that she ran out of the room crying."

It was then that Kaye saw the opportunity to apply his dark sense of humor to turn this rendition of a popular song into a direct stab at the tobacco industry. The copy at the end of the spot sarcastically reads: "Happy Birthday to the tobacco industry. Celebrating 121 years of fine tobacco products."

Kaye, who Favat says is one of the greatest directors in the business, "shot so much footage when we did 'Happy Birthday' that we had enough to use in three different commercials."

Footage of the man in "Happy Birthday," in fact, was also used in "Make It Harder," a spot aimed at youths that shows how easy it is for kids to buy cigarettes, interspersed with shots of people lying in hospital beds hooked up to respirators and other life-support systems.

Time And Money

New clients for Houston Herstek Favat in the last year include Champion paper, Space Tech and Fidelity Investments, whose "Time" - an upbeat approach to financial investing that features the 1969 Chambers Brothers tune "Time Has Come Today" - was directed by Marcus Nispel of bicoastal RSA-USA.

"Marcus is simply a dream director," Favat says. "He's about as creative as they come, and he understands what an agency and a client need to get the point across. He's not just trying to make art films - he understands the business and can take standard things that the client wants and make them exciting."

Nispel also just completed a Converse spot for the agency. "Hall of Fame," introducing the new design of Converse's classic All-Star, features a group of kids playing basketball surrounded by big banners of basketball greats like Connie Hawkins, Julius Erving, Larry Bird and Jerry West.

The music for the spot sets it apart from other neighbor-hood-kids-playing-ball spots. The Carmina Burana-esque piece was composed by Whar Zone, a collaborative team out of Belgium that uses a full orchestra and choir. "They did a demo and when we listened to it, we were blown away," Herstek says.

Throughout the years, the agency has tried to use a variety of artists, both in music and direction, to give their work more diversity. "Hall of Fame" marks the first time the agency used Whar Zone. In the past, however, music featured in their spots has been composed by the likes of David Steel, an independent composer out of Boston, and the staff at bicoastal JSM Music, among others. Changing the director and music house, Favat says, keeps the work fresh.

"We've worked with Spike Jonze and Phil Morrison, who are younger directors, and now we're working with more experienced directors like Nispel and Kaye. We like to mix," he says.

And if they can't find the right director, they've always got each other. Favat and Herstek have, in fact, directed several spots for Converse themselves, including "Ugly," which was shot in several locations using "cool, but nontraditional-looking people," Herstek says.

"We look for directors that can really make a contribution to the work," he adds. "Our philosophy is that sometimes you get really crappy budgets and if you can't get a good, thinking, alternative director [with the budget you're given], you might as well just direct it yourself."

Leave it to a couple of humble guys to come up with an idea like that.

illustration photograph cartoon

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Clinton Grants FDA Authority To Regulate Tobacco

773 words
21 August 1996
08:31 pm
PR Newswire

 c 1996, PR Newswire

R.J. Reynolds' Grandson To Appear On CNN Tonight;

On Larry King And CNBC Thursday

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., Aug. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- The smokefree advocate grandson of R.J. Reynolds will appear on CNN tonight and on CNBC and Larry King on Thursday in connection with Clinton's expected announcement on Friday that he will grant the FDA authority to regulate nicotine as a drug.

Reynolds says, "Clinton is the first president in history who's had the courage to endorse new restrictions on the tobacco industry. It's our biggest victory since Congress banned smoking on domestic flights. We've worked hard for this and we're shouting hooray!

"Yesterday Bob Dole professed concern over escalating teen drug use. If Dole is really so concerned about teen drug use, why is he protecting the tobacco companies -- who addict 3,000 teens a day?

"The government's own reports show that every teen who begins smoking is 100 times more likely to graduate to marijuana, and 30 times more likely to go on to use cocaine. Sixty five percent of cocaine users were cigarette smokers first.

"It's inconsistent that Dole has been protecting the tobacco industry from new restrictions. Last month in the space of a week he questioned the FDA's authority to regulate tobacco, said that nicotine may not be so addictive, and even said that Dr. Koop might be a bit brainwashed. And he's promised to fire the FDA chief David Kessler if elected.

"This is a great example of the tobacco industry's political contributions at work. Eighty five percent of the 2.5 million they gave in contributions this year have gone to the Republicans," says Reynolds.

The Foundation for a Smokefree America recently established an Internet site at www.tobaccofree.com

Mr. Reynolds can be reached in Los Angeles at The Foundation for a Smokefree America, 310-277-1111.

INTERVIEW BROADCAST TIMES:

August 21 at midnight Wednesday night on CNN

Thursday, August 22

Mr. Reynolds' segment on CNBC will air live at 11:45 am, Eastern Standard Time

LARRY KING LIVE is on CNN from 9pm to 10pm, Eastern Standard Time; Mr. Reynolds' segment time is not known.

BIO

Patrick Reynolds is "one of the nation's most influential advocates of a smokefree America," according to former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, who has also called his testimony "invaluable to our society." A grandson of the founder of the R.J. Reynolds tobacco company, Mr. Reynolds testified in Congress in favor of an end to all cigarette advertising, and to help bring about the present 6 hour smoking ban on U.S. domestic flights. Since starting his campaign in 1986, he has spoken before numerous State and municipal legislatures in support of proposed smoking ordinances which became law. In 1988 in California he helped pass the 25 cent per pack State cigarette tax increase. Patrick Reynolds has approached several members of the U.S. Congress about the need to limit the export and advertising of U.S. tobacco brands abroad, and has lobbied for a new law banning cigarette sales to those under 21. In hundreds of television, radio and print interviews, he has helped remind millions of people of the dangers of smoking. In 1988 the U.N.'s World Health Organization honored him with a special award. In 1989, Chicago's Mt. Sinai Hospital awarded Patrick Reynolds its Humanitarian of the Year award.

He's a frequent speaker before colleges, corporations, health groups, and youth groups. While his talk for youth does not include discussion of the government's role in preventing tobacco addiction, before adult audiences he speaks about the need for new restrictions on the tobacco industry -- stronger youth access laws, higher tobacco taxes, and further limits on cigarette advertising. "One key," he says "is enacting real campaign finance reform. There's something very wrong when a Presidential candidate like Bob Dole questions nicotine's addictiveness, challenges the FDA's authority to regulate tobacco, and says that Dr. Koop is brainwashed -- all in the space of a week. This is a great example of the tobacco industry's political contributions at work."

In 1989 Little, Brown published a colorful new family history he co- authored, THE GILDED LEAF. In Los Angeles he presides as chairman of The Foundation for a Smokefree America, a non-profit, charitable organization he founded in 1989. Its mission is to help bring about a smoke free society.

/CONTACT: Sonia Bader or Patrick Reynolds of The Foundation for a Smokefree America, 310-277-1111 or www.tobaccofree.com/ 19:02 EDT

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A

Smokers might get height of unfriendly welcome Montgomery town weighs tobacco ban

Sean Scully
THE WASHINGTON TIMES
879 words
26 September 1996
The Washington Times
2
A1

 

Friendship Heights is offering the cold shoulder to smokers.

The tiny village on the edge of Chevy Chase is considering the nation's most sweeping ban on tobacco use - forbidding any tobacco product to be used or discarded in any public place, including the streets and sidewalks.

"It's not only a public health issue, but it's a cleanliness and littering issue," Village Manager Julian Mansfield said.

But smoking advocates say the village is going too far.

"You can't reach any conclusion other than this is a step toward prohibition. . . . It's simply mean-spiritedness and extremism run amok," said Bill Althaus, chairman of the board of advisers of the National Smokers Alliance.

"It would be the most draconian regulation against personal liberty in the country," said Tom Lauria, spokesman for the Tobacco Institute, the industry's lobbying group.

Friendship Heights Mayor Alfred Muller, who proposed the measure, said the ban would help convince children that smoking is not acceptable. His goal, he said, is to create a "smoke-free generation."

Dr. Muller, who said he's seen the ravages of smoking on his patients, is scornful of his critics.

"Eventually, they are going to die out," said Dr. Muller, a general practitioner in the District. "I think they should smoke as much as they like - that will cut down their membership quickly."

While most jurisdictions have some smoking regulations - banning smoking indoors or restricting it to certain areas, for example - none has an outright ban on outdoor smoking, Mr. Althaus said.

Bellaire, Texas, bans smoking in public parks. Sharon, Mass., bans smoking on the public beach. Neither bans smoking on the street.

Davis, Calif., bans smoking on sidewalks, but only when standing within 20 feet of a doorway. Those who are farther from any door or are walking are free to smoke.

Friendship Heights officials say they are confident the ordinance would stand up in court, pointing to other legal activities that are banned in public, including drinking, urination and sexual activity.

Constitutional scholar A.E. Dick Howard , a law professor at the University of Virginia, said a constitutional challenge would likely fail, provided the village has the power to make the regulation under Maryland law.

"When a government is acting in the interest of public health, you begin with the strong presumption that the government has the power to act," Mr. Howard said.

The Friendship Heights proposal calls for a $100 fine for anyone caught smoking, using smokeless tobacco or discarding any tobacco product on the street. It would not apply to drivers smoking in their cars, though they would be forbiddden to flick cigarette butts or spit tobacco juice out the window.

The ordinance would be enforced by the one village police officer - a Montgomery County officer whose salary comes out of the village's $1.3 million budget.

The mayor's proposal wasn't popular on the streets of the village yesterday.

"It seems to me to be a little too much," said Gerson Kramer, 71, a lawyer who works in the village. "It seems like trying to control human behavior a little too much."

"It's enough that the poor people can't smoke in the buildings - now you want to stop smoking outside," said Ferida Bernouk, 36, a nurse who lives and works in the village.

Smoker Russ Antonille, 58, an investment consultant who works in Friendship Heights, was irritated by the proposal.

"The fellow who gives the first ticket is going to have a tough time," he said, squinting as he pulled apart the remains of a burned-out cigarette.

Even a leading anti-smoking crusader distanced himself from the Friendship Heights plan.

"It gives credence to tobacco-industry arguments that we're out to take away their personal freedoms. That's just not the case," said Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco company founder R.J. Reynolds and advocate of banning indoor smoking.

Because Friendship Heights is not an incorporated town - it's a "special tax district" - any law passed by its council requires the approval of the County Council.

County Council member Neal Potter, an at-large Democrat who has proposed strong anti-smoking legislation, said the council might sign off on the Friendship Heights ban if it appears to enjoy broad support among residents. The Village Council will hold a public hearing Oct. 15.

County Executive Douglas M. Duncan expressed reservations about the ban.

The County Council also is considering a smoking ban. Mr. Potter has proposed a ban on smoking in all county restaurants. Prospects for that measure appear dim, however, because most council members have shown little enthusiasm for it.

This is not the first time Friendship Heights, a community of 5,000 people crammed into a few city blocks near the D.C. line, has gained wide notice with legislation.

In 1981 the village drew national attention when it passed a ban on ammunition as a backdoor way to limit handgun possession.

In 1984 the village tried to ban cigarette-vending machines but was overruled by the County Council.

"Where angels fear to tread, we jump in," Dr. Muller said.

Map, Friendship Heights, By The Washington Times

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CITY/STATE
Subjects: SMOKING; HEALTH

Reynolds grandson fights Big Tobacco

Rick Ansorge; Gazette Telegraph
914 words
18 October 1996
Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph
B1

 

A century ago, cigarettemaker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson - Patrick Reynolds - personifies the movement to bring Big Tobacco down.

"The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century," Reynolds said Thursday during the fifth annual general assembly of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance at the Red Lion Inn.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California-based Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

"Smoking has decimated my family," he said.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts.

Still, he's proud to have been born into one of America's most formidable dynasties.

"Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name," he said, "which has enabled me to reach millions of people."

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's ultimate goal is to end the use of all tobacco products.

"We never thought we'd getsmoking off airplanes," he said. "Now we say, `Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, `Hey, did people ever smoke?' "

Reynolds blames the lack of campaign-finance reform for delaying that goal. He's upset that President Clinton and Republican challenger Bob Dole sidestepped the issue during Wednesday's presidential debate.

This year, he said, tobacco lobbyists have donated $15 million to political candidates, with 85 percent of it going to Republicans.

"They know who their friends are," Reynolds said. "If Dole really cares about children and drugs, why is he protecting the worst child drug of all?"

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before 19, Reynolds refuted the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

"Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own," he said. "We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue."

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

"It sticks in my craw," he said. "Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable."

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti-smoking programs.

"It's no accident," Reynolds said, "that the three most heavily advertised brands - Camel, Marlboro and Newport - are the most heavily smoked brands by teens."

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teen-age smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease - a precursor to emphysema - did he quit.

It took a dozen tries.

"Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin," he said. "Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking."

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

"Had I held on to it, I'd probably be $2 million or $3 million richer," he said.

A decade later, he was publicly speaking out against Big Tobacco, much to the annoyance of the Reynolds dynasty. He has since reconciled with two surviving brothers - both of whom have emphysema - but remains a turncoat in the eyes of his numerous cousins.

Not that it matters, he said.

"I love this work. I'm dedicated to it. I'll do it for the rest of my life."

Smoking in Colorado

Coloradans light up more frequently than the national average. About 24 percent of Colorado adults are regular smokers vs. 20 percent nationally. Here's a statistical glimpse of smoking in Colorado and El Paso County.

Colorado

Number of smokers: 650,000.

Tobacco sales: 211,000,000 packs per year.

Medical costs: $434 million per year.

Adolescent smokers: According to the 1995 Colorado Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 16 percent of Colorado teens smoke 20 or more days per month. More than 70 percent have smoked tobacco at least once. More than 14,000 begin smoking each year.

Tobacco-free school districts: 125, down from 134 in 1995.

Availability: State law forbids tobacco sales to children under 18. Yet studies show that teens can illegally buy cigarettes from vending machines 80 percent of the time; from stores, 40 percent of the time.

El Paso County

Number of smokers: 75,000.

Smoking-related deaths: 569 per year.

Medical costs: $95 million.

Adolescent smokers: An estimated 3,300 high school students are daily smokers.

Sources: American Cancer Society, Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance, El Paso County Department of Health and Environment.

Caption: Jay Janner/Gazette Telegraph - Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, says smoking "decimated" his family. He was in the Springs for a conference.; COLOR PHOTO; INFOBOX

Document csp0000020011013dsai00aa4

© 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

NEWS
EVENING. People.

BIG TOBACCO FACES A FORMIDABLE MATCH: R.J. REYNOLDS' GRANDSON

Rick Ansorge, Knight-Ridder/Tribune.
681 words
30 October 1996
Chicago Tribune
EVENING UPDATE; C
2

 

A century ago, cigarettemaker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson -- Patrick Reynolds -- personifies the movement to bring Big Tobacco down.

"The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century," Reynolds said recently during the annual meeting of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California-based Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

"Smoking has decimated my family," he said.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts.

Still, he's proud to have been born into one of America's most formidable dynasties.

"Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name," he said, "which has enabled me to reach millions of people."

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's ultimate goal is to end the use of all tobacco products.

"We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes," he said. "Now we say, `Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, `Hey, did people ever smoke?' "

Reynolds blames the lack of campaign-finance reform for delaying that goal. He's upset that President Clinton and Republican challenger Bob Dole sidestepped the issue during the last presidential debate. This year, he said, tobacco lobbyists have donated $15 million to political candidates, with 85 percent of it going to Republicans.

"They know who their friends are," Reynolds said. "If Dole really cares about children and drugs, why is he protecting the worst child drug of all?"

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before 19, Reynolds refuted the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

"Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own," he said. "We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue."

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

"Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable."

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti-smoking programs.

"It's no accident," Reynolds said, "that the three most heavily advertised brands -- Camel, Marlboro and Newport -- are the most heavily smoked brands by teens."

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teenage smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease -- a precursor to emphysema -- did he quit. It took a dozen tries.

"Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin," he said. "Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking."

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

"Had I held on to it, I'd probably be $2 million or $3 million richer," he said.

A decade later, he was publicly speaking out against Big Tobacco, much to the annoyance of the Reynolds dynasty. He has since reconciled with two surviving brothers -- both of whom have emphysema -- but remains a turncoat in the eyes of his numerous cousins.

Not that it matters, he said.

"I love this work. I'm dedicated to it. I'll do it for the rest of my life."

Document trib000020011015dsau01w09

© 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

R.J. Reynolds' grandson leads anti-smoking crusade; Heir quits smoking, - divests himself of his Reynolds stock and joins the fight against Big Tobacco

RICK ANSORGE
703 words
3 November 1996
Austin American-Statesman
A23

 

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- A century ago, cigarette maker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson -- Patrick Reynolds -- personifies the movement to bring Big Tobacco down.

``The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century,'' Reynolds said recently during the fifth annual general assembly of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California-based Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

``Smoking has decimated my family,'' he said.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts.

Still, he's proud to have been born into one of America's most formidable dynasties.

``Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name,'' he said, ``which has enabled me to reach millions of people.''

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's ultimate goal is to end the use of all tobacco products.

``We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes,'' he said. ``Now we say, `Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, `Hey, did people ever smoke?'''

Reynolds blames the lack of campaign finance reform for delaying that goal. He's upset that President Clinton and Republican challenger Bob Dole sidestepped the issue during the last presidential debate.

This year, he said, tobacco lobbyists have donated $15 million to political candidates, with 85 percent of it going to Republicans.

``They know who their friends are,'' Reynolds said. ``If Dole really cares about children and drugs, why is he protecting the worst child drug of all?''

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before 19, Reynolds refuted the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

``Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own,'' he said. ``We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue.''

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

``It sticks in my craw,'' he said. ``Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable.''

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti- smoking programs.

``It's no accident,'' Reynolds said, ``that the three most heavily advertised brands -- Camel, Marlboro and Newport -- are the most heavily smoked brands by teens.''

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teen-age smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease -- a precursor to emphysema -- did he quit.

It took a dozen tries.

``Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin,'' he said. ``Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking.''

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

``Had I held on to it, I'd probably be $2 million or $3 million richer,'' he said.

A decade later, he was publicly speaking out against Big Tobacco, much to the annoyance of the Reynolds dynasty. He has since reconciled with two surviving brothers -- both of whom have emphysema -- but remains a turncoat in the eyes of his numerous cousins.

Not that it matters, he said.

``I love this work. I'm dedicated to it. I'll do it for the rest of my life.''

Document aas0000020011012dsb300r73

© 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

NATIONAL

REYNOLDS TOBACCO HEIR FIGHTS FAMILY ACTIVIST SAYS IT'S A DEADLY BUSINESS

RICK ANSORGE Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph
661 words
3 November 1996
The New Orleans Times-Picayune
THIRD
A7

 

A century ago, cigarette maker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson, Patrick Reynolds, personifies the movement to bring down Big Tobacco.

"The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century," Reynolds said recently during the fifth annual general assembly of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance at the Red Lion Inn.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

"Smoking has decimated my family," he said.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts.

Still, he's proud to have been born into one of America's most formidable dynasties.

"Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name," he said, "which has enabled me to reach millions of people."

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's ultimate goal is to end the use of tobacco products.

"We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes," he said. "Now we say, `Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, `Hey, did people ever smoke?' "

Reynolds blames the lack of campaign-finance reform for delaying that goal. He's upset that President Clinton and Republican challenger Bob Dole sidestepped the issue during the most recent presidential debate.

This year, he said, tobacco lobbyists have donated $15 million to political candidates, with 85 percent of it going to Republicans.

"They know who their friends are," Reynolds said. "If Dole really cares about children and drugs, why is he protecting the worst child drug of all?"

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before 19, Reynolds refuted the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

"Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own," he said. "We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue."

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

"It sticks in my craw," he said. "Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable."

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti-smoking programs.

"It's no accident," Reynolds said, "that the three most heavily advertised brands - Camel, Marlboro and Newport - are the most heavily smoked brands by teens."

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teen-age smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease, a precursor to emphysema, did he quit.

It took a dozen tries.

"Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin," he said. "Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking."

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

"Had I held on to it, I'd probably be $2 million or $3 million richer," he said.

A decade later, he was publicly speaking out against Big Tobacco, much to the annoyance of the Reynolds dynasty. He has since reconciled with two surviving brothers, both of whom have emphysema.

Document notp000020011014dsb301763

© 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

Nation-World

Tobacco Heir Kicking Cigarettes' Butts

RICK ANSORGE COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE-TELEGRAPH
694 words
3 November 1996
The Salt Lake Tribune
A18

 

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- A century ago, cigarettemaker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson -- Patrick Reynolds -- personifies the movement to bring Big Tobacco down.

``The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century,'' Reynolds said recently during the fifth annual general assembly of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance at the Red Lion Inn.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California-based Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

``Smoking has decimated my family,'' he said.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts.

Still, he's proud to have been born into one of America's most formidable dynasties.

``Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name,'' he said, ``which has enabled me to reach millions of people.''

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's ultimate goal is to end the use of all tobacco products.

``We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes,'' he said. ``Now we say, `Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, `Hey, did people ever smoke?'''

Reynolds blames the lack of campaign-finance reform for delaying that goal. He's upset that President Clinton and Republican challenger Bob Dole sidestepped the issue during the last presidential debate.

This year, he said, tobacco lobbyists have donated $15 million to political candidates, with 85 percent of it going to Republicans.

``They know who their friends are,'' Reynolds said. ``If Dole really cares about children and drugs, why is he protecting the worst child drug of all?''

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before 19, Reynolds refuted the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

``Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own,'' he said. ``We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue.''

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

``It sticks in my craw,'' he said. ``Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable.''

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti-smoking programs.

``It's no accident,'' Reynolds said, ``that the three most heavily advertised brands -- Camel, Marlboro and Newport -- are the most heavily smoked brands by teens.''

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teen-age smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease -- a precursor to emphysema -- did he quit.

It took a dozen tries.

``Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin,'' he said. ``Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking.''

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

``Had I held on to it, I'd probably be $2 million or $3 million richer,'' he said.

A decade later, he publicly was speaking out against Big Tobacco, much to the annoyance of the Reynolds dynasty. He has since reconciled with two surviving brothers -- both of whom have emphysema -- but remains a turncoat in the eyes of his numerous cousins. Not that it matters, he said.

``I love this work. I'm dedicated to it. I'll do it for the rest of my life.''

Document sltr000020011015dsb3011w6

© 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

NEWS

Reynolds Heir Fights Smoking

Rick Ansorge
Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph
692 words
3 November 1996
Tulsa World
FINAL HOME EDITION
A2

 

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- A century ago, cigarettemaker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson -- Patrick Reynolds -- personifies the movement to bring Big Tobacco down.

"The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century," Reynolds said recently during the fifth annual general assembly of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance at the Red Lion Inn.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California-based Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

"Smoking has decimated my family," he said.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts.

Still, he's proud to have been born into one of America's most formidable dynasties.

"Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name," he said, "which has enabled me to reach millions of people."

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's ultimate goal is to end the use of all tobacco products.

"We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes," he said. "Now we say, `Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, `Hey, did people ever smoke?'"

Reynolds blames the lack of campaign-finance reform for delaying that goal. He's upset that President Clinton and Republican challenger Bob Dole sidestepped the issue during the last presidential debate.

This year, he said, tobacco lobbyists have donated $15 million to political candidates, with 85 percent of it going to Republicans.

"They know who their friends are," Reynolds said. "If Dole really cares about children and drugs, why is he protecting the worst child drug of all?"

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before 19, Reynolds disputed the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

"Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own," he said. "We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue."

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

"It sticks in my craw," he said. "Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable."

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti-smoking programs.

"It's no accident," Reynolds said, "that the three most heavily advertised brands -- Camel, Marlboro and Newport -- are the most heavily smoked brands by teens."

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teen-age smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease -- a precursor to emphysema -- did he quit.

It took a dozen tries.

"Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin," he said. "Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking."

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

"Had I held on to it, I'd probably be $2 million or $3 million richer," he said.

A decade later, he was publicly speaking out against Big Tobacco, much to the annoyance of the Reynolds dynasty. He has since reconciled with two surviving brothers -- both of whom have emphysema -- but remains a turncoat in the eyes of his numerous cousins.

Not that it matters, he said.

"I love this work. I'm dedicated to it. I'll do it for the rest of my life."

Document tul0000020011015dsb300x0r

© 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

B

Smoke-free America sought

Rick Ansorge
731 words
10 November 1996
The Las Vegas Review-Journal
Final
12B

 

Smoke-free America sought

Grandson fighting industry his family made famous

"Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name, which has enabled me to reach millions of people.

"Patrick ReynoldsFounder, Citizens for a SmokeFree America

By Rick Ansorge

Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - A century ago, cigarette maker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson - Patrick Reynolds - personifies the movement to bring Big Tobacco down.

"The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century," Reynolds said recently during the fifth annual general assembly of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California-based Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

"Smoking has decimated my family," he said.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts.

Still, he's proud to have been born into one of America's most formidable dynasties.

"Perhaps the greatest inheritance my father left me was the name," he said, "which has enabled me to reach millions of people."

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's ultimate goal is to end the use of all tobacco products.

"We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes," he said. "Now we say, `Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, `Hey, did people ever smoke?"'

Reynolds blames the lack of campaign-finance reform for delaying that goal.

He's upset that President Clinton and Republican challenger Bob Dole sidestepped the issue during their final debate before the election.

This year, he said, tobacco lobbyists have donated $15 million to political candidates, with 85 percent of it going to Republicans.

"They know who their friends are," Reynolds said. "If Dole really cares about children and drugs, why is he protecting the worst child drug of all?"

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before 19, Reynolds refuted the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

"Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own," he said. "We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue."

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

"It sticks in my craw," he said. "Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable."

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti-smoking programs.

"It's no accident," Reynolds said, "that the three most heavily advertised brands - Camel, Marlboro and Newport - are the most heavily smoked brands by teens."

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teen-age smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease - a precursor to emphysema - did he quit.

It took a dozen tries.

"Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin," he said. "Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking."

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

"Had I held on to it, I'd probably be $2 million or $3 million richer," he said.

A decade later, he was publicly speaking out against Big Tobacco, much to the annoyance of the Reynolds dynasty. He has since reconciled with two surviving brothers - both of whom have emphysema - but remains a turncoat in the eyes of his numerous cousins.

Not that it matters, he said.

"I love this work. I'm dedicated to it. I'll do it for the rest of my life."

Document lvgs000020011014dsba00ge4

© 2003 Dow Jones Reuters Business Interactive LLC (trading as Factiva). All rights reserved.

 

 

Capital Region

Smokeout supporters take their message to youngsters

MICHAEL LOPEZ Staff writer
722 words
18 November 1996
Times Union Albany, NY
ONE STAR
B7

 

This year's annual event will focus on asking kids not to pick up the cigarette habit

Long focused on coaxing adults to quit smoking, the 20th Great American Smokeout this week will change its tactic, instead asking youth not to start using tobacco.

Though American Cancer Society's smokeout day -- this Thursday -- is still reserved to kick the habit -- the organization now is bringing its message to elementary-age children, reasoning that recalcitrant teenagers won't take the advice anyway.

"Our message is, `don't start,' " said Carol Dadeo, cancer control coordinator of the American Cancer Society.

It is the same message that President Clinton, in the election-year political arena, carried in August, when he declared nicotine an addictive drug that will be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration.

The regulations will tightly control advertising that advocates say is targeted at youth, so the familiar Marlboro Man or slim models pictured on billboards will disappear. Such logos will come off of hats and T-shirts as well. The law bans cigarette vending machines and limits the use of advertising in magazines and near schools. In six months, store clerks must demand a photo ID to sell cigarettes. The other regulations will take effect in a year.

The sale of tobacco to children under 18 already is illegal. Still, the American Cancer Society estimates that 3,000 youth a day start smoking and that one-third of those will die early from tobacco-related disease.

Local organizers, who harshly criticize the tobacco industry for contriving images aimed at youth, like Joe Camel, are bringing in big guns to support their cause.

Industry representatives have insisted such advertisements do not encourage youth, but are meant to entice adults to switch brands. The industry has sued to block the rules.

In a week's worth of activities dedicated to the Smokeout, the keynote speaker will by anti-tobacco activist Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco company R.J. Reynolds.

Reynolds tells an ironic story: how a family made wealthy by tobacco also was decimated by it. His father, R.J. Reynolds Jr., died at 58 of emphysema caused by smoking. His brother R.J. III, 60, a died two years ago of the same disease.

And Reynolds himself smoked Winstons -- his family's brand -- before successfully quitting 11 years ago.

"My only memory of my father is that of a man lying down on his back, dying of emphysema caused by smoking," Reynolds said in a telephone interview Friday.

He is appearing at several key Capital Region events: he will speak at 7 tonight at Sage Junior College of Albany, 140 New Scotland Ave. Seated is limited to 100 people. He'll also speak briefly at a memorial service for people who have died of tobacco-related illnesses. The service will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday in the Rotunda of the Albany County Courthouse.

Using more than half of his inheritance, Reynolds in 1989 founded the non-profit Foundation for a Smoke-free America. He has divested himself of company stock. His inheritance did come from the Reynolds family. "Some people fault me for that. It is a gift I've used to fuel my campaign and I donated a majority to the cause. And I make no apologies for that."

Reynolds is enthused by the FDA regulations, particularly requirements that billboards use black-and-white letters instead of colorful graphics and the need for a photo ID.

Still, Reynolds would like to see merchants charged licensing fees, which would fund compliance checks, or stings employing teenagers to purposely buy cigarettes.

He also would like to see the legal age to buy tobacco raised from 18 to 21.

Reynolds also will speak to students at 8:15 a.m. Tuesday at Rensselaer Middle School.

The Cancer Society plans two daily anti-smoking programs in area schools this week.

At 2 p.m. Thursday, the official Smokeout day, the Cancer Society will start its Great American Smoke Scream, a seven-second primal scream among schoolchildren nationwide. It is meant to symbolize the power of healthy lungs.

Reynolds' appearance is sponsored by the Capital District Tobacco-Free Coalition, which includes such groups as the Society and the American Lung Association.

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Life & Leisure

Best Bets

183 words
18 November 1996
Times Union Albany, NY
ONE STAR
C2

 

A song in her heart

Actress and cabaret singer Andrea Marcovicci performs tonight at 8:15 at the Empire Center at The Egg in a benefit concert for The Millay Colony for the Arts. Empire State Plaza, Albany. 392-4144 or 473-1845. $30. Preserving the past

Learn about "Saving and Restoring Landmark Churches" at 6 tonight. Landmarks Conservancy president Peg Breen will also speak about the Sacred Sites and Properties Fund. Westminster Presbyterian, 262 State St., Albany. Free.The last laugh

Veteran and controversial funnyman Jackie Mason appears tonight at 8 at Proctor's Theatre, State Street, Schenectady. 346-6204. $20.50-$25.50.The band plays on

Entwistle. Daltrey. Townshend. Don't miss '60s and '70s icons The Who tonight at 7:30 at Knickerbocker Arena, 51 S. Pearl St., Albany. 487-2000. $25-$45.Waiting to exhale

Take in "An Evening With Patrick Reynolds" tonight at 7 at The Sage Colleges. Hear R.J. Reynolds' grandson, an outspoken crusader against smoking. Campus Center, Room 224, New Scotland Avenue, Albany. Free. --Compiled by Michele Morgan Bolton

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LOCAL

REYNOLDS TO SPEAK AT COLLEGE

88 words
19 November 1996
Buffalo News
S-TIER
B4

 

Patrick Reynolds, the grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds, will bring his crusade against smoking to the area beginning at 7 p.m. Thursday, when he speaks in the Williams Center on the Fredonia State College campus.

Reynolds, whose father and brother died of emphysema caused by smoking, started the Foundation for a Smoke-Free America, and testified before Congress in 1986 in hearings that lead to the banning of smoking on all domestic air flights.

Reynolds advocates more government intervention.

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LOCAL

REYNOLDS DISCUSSES POLITICS OF TOBACCO, KICKING SMOKING HABIT AT COLLEGE

TERRY WEBSTER - News Chautauqua Correspondent
420 words
22 November 1996
Buffalo News
B5

The politics of tobacco and how to stop smoking were addressed Thursday at Fredonia State College by Patrick Reynolds of Beverly Hills, grandson of tobacco magnate R.J. Reynolds.

The founder of Foundation for a Smoke-Free America, Reynolds has been campaigning against smoking since 1986. He claims his family has "no problem" with his efforts.

The motivation for his activism was the deaths of his father and brother from emphysema caused by smoking. Reynolds' accomplishments include being instrumental in Congress' decision to ban all smoking on U.S. domestic air travel.

Reynolds said he would like to see a smoke-free society, a total ban on tobacco advertising, a minimum purchase age of 21, laws to stop children from purchasing tobacco over the counter and higher cigarette taxes.

"If we speak the truth about this product we will have a smoke-free society," he said. "Cigarettes cause addiction, disease and death. Changes are not being made because of powerful tobacco lobbyists and millions of dollars given by the tobacco industry to political campaigns.

"They gave $15 million last year and 85 percent of the money went to Republican candidates," he said. "The rest went to supportive Democrats."

Advertising needs to be controlled because it targets youths, and most smokers begin smoking before age 19, said Reynolds, who does not believe advertising restrictions violate Constitutional rights. He believes private and political speech should be protected but not commercial speech.

The City of Baltimore recently banned all tobacco advertising that could be seen by youths and the decision was upheld in Appellate Court, Reynolds said, adding the tobacco industry does not have a lot of strength at the local level.

A former smoker who failed at quitting 12 times, Reynolds offered advice to a student in the audience of about 30 in the college's Williams Center.

He said some of the basics are drinking a lot of water, avoiding sugar, exercising, using cigarette substitutes and asking pharmacists for advice.

"What worked for me is understanding quitting has two phases," said Reynolds.

Phase one is being off of cigarettes for days, weeks or months. In phase two, the urge to smoke often strikes out of the blue and with great intensity.

"You rationalize that you can have just one," Reynolds said. "But if you take one, you will go back to smoking. It took me 12 failures to learn I couldn't have that one."

 

 

 

News

This Reynolds Works to Beat Big Tobacco

The Colorado Springs Gazette-Telgraph
483 words
28 November 1996
The Omaha World-Herald
Sunrise
5B

A century ago, cigarette maker R.J. Reynolds personified Big Tobacco.

Now his grandson - Patrick Reynolds - personifies the movement to bring down Big Tobacco.

"The World Health Organization predicts that 500 million people now alive worldwide will die from smoking. This is the greatest crime of the 20th century," Reynolds said here during a meeting of the Colorado ASSIST American Stop Smoking Intervention Study Alliance.

In 1989, Reynolds founded the California-based Citizens for a SmokeFree America because he has a personal ax to grind.

Smoking-induced emphysema killed his father, R.J. Reynolds II, and his older brother, R.J. Reynolds III. Smoking also played a role in the premature deaths of his mother and two aunts, he said.

Citizens for a SmokeFree America advocates banning cigarette advertising and vending-machine sales, raising the legal minimum smoking age to 21 and the cigarette tax to $2 a pack, and limiting cigarette exports. The organization's goal is to end the use of tobacco products.

"We never thought we'd get smoking off airplanes," Reynolds said. "Now we say, 'Hey, did people ever smoke on airplanes?' One day we're going to look back and say, 'Hey, did people ever smoke?' "

Citing studies showing that the vast majority of smokers take up the habit before age 19, Reynolds disputes the tobacco industry's position that smoking is a choice.

"Children are not going to make wise decisions on their own," he said. "We need a strong hand from adults and the government on this issue."

He especially hates Joe Camel, the cartoon character used to market R.J. Reynolds' Camel cigarettes.

"Sixty percent of 6-year-olds can match the character with a cigarette. That's intolerable," he said.

Each year, the tobacco industry spends $4 billion on cigarette advertising while the federal government spends $101 million on anti-smoking programs.

"It's no accident," Reynolds said, "that the three most heavily advertised brands - Camel, Marlboro and Newport - are the most heavily smoked brands by teens."

He blames the widespread use of sexy, thin models in cigarette advertising for the startling rise in teen-age smoking. Between 1991 and 1995, the percentage of high school students using tobacco products increased from 27.5 percent to 34.8 percent.

Reynolds, 47, knows how seductive cigarettes can be. Even though he knew cigarettes were to blame for his father's death, he started smoking at 18 to be cool. Not until 17 years later, after developing small-airways disease - a precursor to emphysema - did he quit.

It took a dozen tries.

"Cigarettes are as addictive as heroin," he said. "Eighty percent of smokers who quit go back to smoking."

In 1979, Reynolds divested himself of all his R.J. Reynolds stock.

A decade later, he was publicly speaking out against Big Tobacco